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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Barton
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Page 1 of 3 showing 10 records of 22 total, starting on record 1
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Abel Residence

Picture of property 2601 Paseo
Great Bend (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2001-03-02

Architect: Brack Implements, Great Bend, Kansas (builder)
Category: secondary structure; single dwelling

The Abel Residence is nominated for its architectural significance as one of fewer than 100 extant Lustron houses in Kansas. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, architectural pundits heralded the prefabricated house -particularly the metal house - as the wave of the future. The most famous producer of the prefabricated metal home of the postwar era was the Lustron Corporation, which manufactured an all-steel house that it boasted could be sold for $7,000. The Abel Residence, constructed in 1949 by Brack Implements of Great Bend, is the Westchester Deluxe two-bedroom model with a "Surf Blue" exterior and "Dove Gray" roof tiles. There were eight Lustron dealers in Kansas - including Brack Implements in Great Bend. The Abel Residence was the only Lustron house to be built in the Hacienda Addition of Great Bend.



Allen Buildings

Picture of property 1401 Main St. & 2006 Forest St.
Great Bend (Barton County)
Listed in State Register 2017-11-18

Architect: Unknown
Category: commerce

Located at the northwest corner of Forest and Main, the A.S. Allen Buildings are prominently situated in Great Bend’s commercial core and represent a portion of the commercial development of the town. The store facing Main Street traces its beginnings to 1875 when druggist Albert S. Allen had it constructed. Over the following decades, the Allen Building expanded and received design modifications. The Brinkman Building, facing Forest St, was in place in the mid-1880s, serving a variety of commercial functions. Although physically connected, the two buildings housed different commercial functions. The two buildings are significant for their association with Albert S. Allen of Allen’s Drugs and his direct effect on developing the city of Great Bend. Further, as examples of the various design trends in Great Bend between 1875 and the mid-1940s, the two buildings are also significant for their architecture. Together the two buildings are significant as a cornerstone and relic to the city of Great Bend.



Beaver Creek Native Stone Bridge

Picture of property NE 50 Ave. S & NE 230 Rd - 1/4 mile S on NE 50 Ave.
Beaver (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2008-04-16

Architect: Work Projects Administration
Category: road-related

Located on a rural county road, this single-arch limestone bridge spans the headwaters of Beaver Creek. The decorative keystone notes the bridge's 1941 construction date. The locally quarried stone features a rusticated finish and retains its tool markings. The bridge is nominated for its association with the Works Projects Administration and for its architectural significance as unique single-arch limestone bridge.



Bridge #218 - Off System Bridge

Picture of property NE 60 Ave. S & NE 220 Rd 500 Ft. West on 220 Rd
Beaver (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2008-04-16

Architect: Work Projects Administration
Category: road-related

This concrete bridge with native limestone supports and wing walls is located on a rural county road and crosses a tributary of Beaver Creek. The bridge superstructure, curbing, and side rails are made of concrete and are supported by a limestone base. The bridge was a Works Projects Administration (WPA) project and is nominated for its association with the WPA. "WPA 1940" is stamped into the concrete curb on the bridge.



Bridge #222 - Off System Bridge

Picture of property NE 60 Ave. S & NE 210 Rd. 1/8 mile East on 210 Rd
Beaver (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2008-07-02

Architect: Works Projects Administration
Category: road-related

Located on a rural county road near Beaver, this concrete and stone bridge spans a tributary of Beaver Creek in northeast Barton County. Bridge construction was completed in 1940 as a Works Projects Administration job. "WPA" is stamped in the north concrete curb and "1940" is stamped in the south concrete curb. The bridge supports and foundation are made of native limestone, and the deck is made of concrete. Concrete bridge rails span the length of the bridge on each side. The county-owned bridge is nominated for its association with the WPA and for its native limestone construction.



Bridge #640 - Federal Aid Highway System Bridge

Picture of property NE 60 Avenue - 1/8 mile north of NE 210 Road
Beaver (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2008-07-02

Architect: Works Projects Administration
Category: road-related

Located on a rural county road near Beaver, this concrete and stone bridge spans a tributary of Beaver Creek in northeast Barton County. Bridge construction began in 1938 as a Works Projects Administration project and final cement work was completed in 1941. "WPA 1941" is stamped in the cement curb on the bridge. The bridge supports and foundation are made of native limestone, and the deck is made of concrete. Concrete bridge rails span the length of the bridge on each side. The county-owned bridge is nominated for its association with the WPA and for its native limestone construction.



Bridge #650 - Federal Aid Highway System Bridge

Picture of property NE 60 Avenue - 1/12 mile south of NE 220 Road
Beaver (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2008-07-02

Architect: Works Projects Administration
Category: road-related

Located on a rural county road near Beaver, this concrete and stone bridge spans a tributary of Beaver Creek in northeast Barton County. Bridge construction began in 1938 as a Works Projects Administration project and final cement work was completed in 1940. "WPA 1940" is stamped in the cement curb on the bridge. The bridge supports and foundation are made of native limestone, and the deck is made of concrete. Concrete bridge rails span the length of the bridge on each side. The county-owned bridge is nominated for its association with the WPA and for its native limestone construction.



Crest Theater

Picture of property 1905 Lakin Ave
Great Bend (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2005-02-09

Architect: Robert Boller & Dietz Lusk Jr.
Category: theater

Constructed in 1950 by Kansas City based owners Commonwealth Theatres, the Crest Theater was built by Flett Construction Company as a three-story masonry commercial building. Noted theater architect Robert Boller designed the building with geometric and Art Moderne influences. The interior boasts murals and interior decorations from artist Frank Oschwald. Other innovations included a heated sidewalk in front of the building to aid in the melting of snow during the winter months. The Crest Theater was nominated as part of the "Historic Theaters and Opera Houses of Kansas" multiple property nomination for its association with local entertainment history and for its architecture.



Dick Building

Picture of property 2-4 N Main
Ellinwood (Barton County)
Listed in State Register 1990-02-24

Architect: unknown
Category: specialty store; pedestrian-related

As the second oldest building in Ellinwood, the Dick Building was constructed in 1887 as a two-story brick building with tower. The building housed various businesses and in 1900 Mathias Dick purchased the property to house his hardware and farm implements business. The Ellinwood Telephone Exchange, also owned by Dick and a partner Ed Bockemohle, was located in the building as well. It is significant for its contribution to local commercial development in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.



Great Bend AAF Hangar

Picture of property 9047 N 6th St
Great Bend (Barton County)
Listed in National Register 2015-10-05

Architect: US Army Corps of Engineers
Category: military facility

The Great Bend Army Air Field (AAF) hangar is directly associated with the federal government’s wartime aviation operations from 1939 to 1945. Constructed in 1942-1943, the concrete, wood, and metal squadron hangar was designed by the Army Corps of Engineers for the maintenance and modification of aircraft as part of a national defense strategy that placed air fields in south central and southwest Kansas. The well-preserved hangar is the oldest remaining resource from Great Bend’s World War II air field and is therefore nominated as part of the World War II-Era Aviation-Related Facilities of Kansas multiple property nomination.



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