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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Doniphan
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Page 2 of 4 showing 10 records of 38 total, starting on record 11
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Eylar, Matthew, Barn No. 2

Picture of property 5.5 miles southeast of Denton
Denton (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1987-05-07

Architect: unknown
Category: animal facility

The Mathew Eylar Barn No. 2 was constructed in 1933 and is located on the Anderson Farm near Denton. It is a one-story, central entrance, vertically planked, metal sheathed, and gambrel roof barn, built into the side of a bluff with a cement supporting wall. This structure was originally used as a stock barn for Angus cattle and is now used for light machinery, hay storage and houses some animals. This barn was nominated as one of the 18 Byre and Bluff barns of Doniphan County. A common feature of these barns is that at least one side of the foundation is embedded in an earthen bank or bluff. These barns are an example of vernacular architecture built to take advantage of the hilly topography and are significant for their relative rarity and architecture.



Fanning Archelogical Site

Picture of property Address Restricted
Fanning (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1972-06-20

Architect: Not listed
Category: archaeological site; village site



First National Bank Building

Picture of property 422-424 West Main Street
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 2008-07-02

Architect: Not listed
Category: vacant/not in use; financial institution; specialty store; post office

Built in 1913, the First National Bank Building served as a social and business center in Highland for much of the early 20th century. Construction of the building began immediately after a fire destroyed several commercial buildings. The two-story brick building has two storefronts and reflects the early 20th century Commercial style. The bank closed during the Great Depression and the local post office then occupied the space until 2000. It is nominated for its association with local commerce.



Gilmore-Kent Farm

Picture of property SW 1/4, NW 1/4, S5, T3S, R20E
Highland vicinity (Doniphan County)
Listed in State Register 1994-02-26

Architect: unknown
Category: agricultural outbuilding; agricultural field; secondary structure; single dwelling

In 1861 Samuel Dixon Gilmore (1828-1909) purchased 160 acres in section 5 in the Wolf River Valley. His family resided there until 1895 when they moved to Sheriden County, Kansas. This property is significant for its historic association with Samuel Dixon Gilmore and for its architectural significance as a relatively intact grouping of 19th century agricultural buildings and structures. The nominated property includes several resources built between the 1860s and 1960, including a Federal style, limestone, I-house.



Hale, John R., Barn

Picture of property 3.25 miles south of Highland
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1987-05-07

Architect: unknown
Category: agricultural outbuilding

The John R. Hale Barn was constructed in 1881 and is located near Highland. It is a three-bay, double center entrance, board-and-batten barn and has a full byre with limestone foundation and metal sheathed gable roof. The structure was originally constructed as a mixed-use barn, but the building is now used for hay storage and dairy cows. This barn was nominated as one of the 18 Byre and Bluff barns of Doniphan County. A common feature of these barns is that at least one side of the foundation is embedded in an earthen bank or bluff. These barns are an example of vernacular architecture built to take advantage of the hilly topography and are significant for their relative rarity and architecture.



Hanson, George, Barn

Picture of property 1 mile south of Leona
Leona (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1987-05-07

Architect: N/A
Category: animal facility

The George Hanson Barn built in 1900 is located on the Alice Hanson Farm near Leona. This one-story, three-bay, gable entrance, board-and-batten barn has a full byre with a limestone foundation and wooden shingled roof. The barn was originally used as a draft animal barn and is now utilized as hay storage. This barn was nominated as one of the 18 Byre and Bluff barns of Doniphan County. A common feature of these barns is that at least one side of the foundation is embedded in an earthen bank or bluff. These barns are an example of vernacular architecture built to take advantage of the hilly topography and are significant for their relative rarity and architecture.



Highland Christian Church

Picture of property 102 E. Main Street
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 2007-04-04

Architect: Honeywell, 1914 architect
Category: religious facility

The Highland Christian Church (c. 1904) is designed in a variation of the Shingle style, popular from around 1880 until the very early 1900s. The building is locally significant as a small-town adaptation of the national Shingle style and because prominent local builder Ely Saunders oversaw construction of the building. Upon completion in May 1904, the new church was touted in The Highland Vidette as "the handsomest in Highland."



Highland Presbyterian Church

Picture of property 101 South Avenue
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 2007-04-04

Architect: R. B. Chandler
Category: religious facility

The Highland Presbyterian Church (c. 1914) is significant as a vernacular example of the Collegiate Gothic style. The building's flat-roof design and its lack of a steeple was a radical departure for a religious building in small-town Kansas in 1914. The roots of the Highland Presbyterian Church date to 1843 and are closely tied to Highland's beginnings. The small congregation - the oldest Presbyterian church in Kansas - first met at the Sac Fox Indian Mission school building in 1845 two miles east of present-day Highland.



Iowa, Sac and Fox Presbyterian Mission

Picture of property 1.5 miles east of Highland on US-36
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1970-12-02

Architect: unknown
Category: religious facility; church school

In 1837 the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions sent Samuel M. Irvin and his wife to establish a mission among the Iowa, Sac and Fox Native American Tribes that had been pushed into Kansas. This was the first permanent white settlement in what is now Doniphan County. In 1846 a school was completed. The building was originally three stories and topped with a belfry. The first story was native stone and the two others were red brick. Three-fifths of the building was razed after it was sold in 1868. The existing part of the building is now owned and maintained by the State of Kansas. This building is significant as a physical remnant of the Presbyterian - Native American mission activities in Kansas.



Irvin Hall, Highland Community Junior College

Picture of property on US-36
Highland (Doniphan County)
Listed in National Register 1971-02-24

Architect: unknown
Category: college

Irvin Hall of Highland Community Junior College opened in 1859. The building was named in honor of Rev. Samuel M. Irvin, founder and missionary of the Iowa, Sac and Fox Presbyterian Mission, and a founder of the school. The Highland Presbytery operated the college until 1866 and the Presbyterian Synod took responsibility for it from 1866 to 1882 and again from 1905 to 1913. In 1920 the building became a junior college. This building is an excellent example of a vernacular interpretation of the Federal style. The building is two stories with a rectangular plan, a red brick exterior, and a gable roof. It also has pilasters located between the windows of the south front and east side, brick patterns above the windows, and includes a square wood bell tower with a flat roof at its east end. Irvin Hall is significant because of the building's architecture, and also because it is likely the oldest higher education building in Kansas and is still used for education.



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