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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Labette
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Page 2 of 2 showing 6 records of 16 total, starting on record 11
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Parsons Filled Arch Bridge

Picture of property off US-160, 1 mile east and 1.2 miles south of Parsons
Parsons (Labette County)
Listed in National Register 1985-07-02

Architect: Not listed
Category: road-related



Parsons Katy Hospital

Picture of property 400 Katy Avenue
Parsons (Labette County)
Listed in National Register 2008-01-31

Architect: Robertson and Griesenbeck (Dallas TX)
Category: single dwelling; clinic

The Katy Hospital, located at 400 Katy Avenue, was among approximately 40 major railroad hospitals nationwide operated by nearly 20 different railroad companies. Four of these hospitals, including the Parsons Katy Hospital, were located in Kansas. The other three Kansas railroad hospitals, operated by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, were located in Ottawa, Mulvane, and Topeka. The Parsons hospital was constructed in 1922. Dallas architects Robertson and Griesenbeck designed the hospital in the popular Colonial Revival style and incorporated elements that were emerging in modern hospital design. A nurses' home was added to the site in 1927, and it was designed to be a relatively small-scale Colonial Revival building to convey the appearance of a single-family residence. In 1967, an addition was added to the hospital building. The two buildings were nominated for their architectural significance and for their association with early twentieth-century health care.



Pumpkin Creek Tributary Bridge

Picture of property off K-22, 2 miles west of Mound Valley
Mound Valley (Labette County)
Listed in National Register 1985-07-02

Architect: Not listed
Category: road-related



Riverside Park

Picture of property North Oregon Street, NE corner of Oswego
Oswego (Labette County)
Listed in National Register 2012-07-17

Architect: Wilson & Company; Works Progress Administration
Category: park; outdoor recreation

A group of 36 Oswego-area women formed the Ladies' Entertainment Society in 1887 for the purpose of raising funds to acquire land to establish a park overlooking the Neosho River. They acquired a few acres at a time and in 1902 transferred ownership of the park to the City of Oswego. Small park projects were noted in local newspapers of the early 20th century, but there was no collective effort to fully develop the park until the 1930s. Today's park is largely the reflection of New Deal-era labor that constructed a swimming pool and bathhouse, picnic shelters, and landscape elements. The local newspapers covered seemingly every detail about the construction and subsequent dedication of the pool, but little else of the park's development in the 1930s. Events taking place in the newly developed park included band concerts, family and community picnics, and even "Parkshos," which was described in the Oswego Democrat as a new form of entertainment "where-in patrons view the show from the comfortable luxury of their own motor cars in the cool open air." In subsequent decades the park boundaries expanded, but only this 17-acre historic section is nominated for its local significance in the areas of recreation, entertainment, and architecture.



Smith-Hollingsworth-Thomas Log Cabin

Picture of property Thomas Park
Oswego (Labette County)
Listed in State Register 1986-05-10

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling



The Parsonian Hotel

Picture of property 1725 Broadway Avenue
Parsons (Labette County)
Listed in National Register 2015-04-14

Architect: Not listed
Category: hotel

The Parsonian Hotel at 1725 Broadway Avenue sits in the heart of downtown Parsons. Constructed in 1954, the hotel was intended to provide accommodations for business travelers, to promote new commercial and industrial ventures, and to attract conventions to town. Construction of the building was financed primarily by the sale of stock to local residents who made up the ownership group. The building reflects the International architectural style, which was popular before and after World War II. The eight-story concrete-frame building has a two-story base that covers the majority of the site, and a six-story hotel room tower set back from the edges of the base. The two-story base is constructed primarily of red brick, with aluminum windows and storefront, limestone accents below the storefront, concrete window-surrounds at the second story, and horizontal projecting concrete canopies. The tower is constructed of yellow-brick, concrete, and aluminum double-hung ribbon-windows. It was nominated for its local significance in the areas of commerce and architecture.



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