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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Atchison
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Page 3 of 5 showing 10 records of 42 total, starting on record 21
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Hetherington, W.W., House

Picture of property 805 N 5th St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 1974-07-12

Architect: Alfred Meier
Category: single dwelling

This house was designed by architect Alfred Meier and constructed in 1879-1880 by contractor John Peterson. This brick residence exemplifies the Romanesque style and features two dominant corner towers. Atchison businessman W.W. Hetherington, who lived in this residence, brought his family to Atchison in 1859. The property is significant for its architecture and its association with Hetherington.



Horan, Michael J. and Mattie, House

Picture of property 822 N 4th St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 2006-05-17

Architect: William H. Braun
Category: single dwelling

The Michael J. and Mattie Horan house was designed and built by Atchison architect and builder William H. Braun in 1924. It was nominated for its eclectic combination of the Tudor Revival and Colonial Revival styles with Craftsman accents.



Howard, Frank, House

Picture of property 305 N Terrace
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 1984-10-15

Architect: H. B. Prudden
Category: secondary structure; single dwelling

Atchison businessman Frank Howard, who operated a wholesale dry goods and men's clothing business, lived in this Eastlake-style residence. Designed by H.B. Prudden and built in 1884-1885, the brick house features ornate trim common to the Eastlake style. It is significant for its architecture.



Howe, Edgar W., House

Picture of property 1117 N 3rd
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 1972-03-16

Architect: unknown
Category: single dwelling

Built in the early 1880s, the Edgar Watson Howe home is a two-story brick structure with a large porch and two projecting towers on the north and south elevations. Howe established the Daily Globe newspaper shortly after moving to Atchison, which is still in operation. After retiring from the newspaper, he continued writing and published a Story of a Country Town and Ventures in Common Sense. He is perhaps best known for his magazine, S.W. Howe's Monthly. The property is significant for its association with Howe.



Jansen House

Picture of property 806 N 3rd St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 2005-12-06

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling

The Jansen House is a two-and-a-half-story wood structure nominated for its Queen Anne-style architecture. Built circa 1900, the house reflects the Queen Anne style in its irregular roofline, spindlework porch details, and oriel windows. Helen Jansen was the first owner of record, and the house remained in her family until 1927.



John A. Martin Grade School (Martin East)

Picture of property 507 Division
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 2016-06-23

Architect: Saylor & Seddon; Radotinshy, Joseph W.
Category: school

Atchison's 1915 John A. Martin Grade School exemplifies a city graded school from the pre-World War I era. W. H. Saylor & Herbert R. Seddon, of the firm Saylor & Seddon, designed the three-story Classical Revival masonry structure with classrooms and specialized rooms for manual training and assembly. In 1952 a one-story brick gymnasium, designed by Joseph W. Radotinsky, was added. From 1915 to 1955, the Martin School served white students while two blocks west, the Lincoln School served African-American children. When the district was fully integrated, the Martin School served all students from kindergarten through third grades. The John A. Martin Grade School retains a high degree of architectural integrity from its period of significance, 1915 to 1966; it continued to function as an elementary school through May 1997.



Lanphear-Mitchell House

Picture of property 417 N 4th St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 2005-12-06

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling

Constructed in 1883 for Dr. Albert H. Lanphear, the house's configuration changed in 1897 after being purchased by M. J. Mitchell. Lanphear practiced medicine and participated in managing the Perpetual Building and Savings Association. Mitchell was a conductor for the Central Branch Union Pacific Railroad. The house displays Queen Anne-style architecture and includes an irregular roofline, spindlework porch details, and a wrap-around porch. It was nominated for is architectural significance.



Lincoln School

Picture of property 801 Division St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 2006-06-07

Architect: Not listed
Category: school

Lincoln School was built in 1921 for African-American students and played a role in local discussions about public school integration in the mid-20th century. Atchison schools were integrated in 1955, and this school is the last extant public building in Atchison that was built for and served African Americans. The building is nominated as part of the "Historic Public Schools of Kansas" multiple property submission and is significant for its association with local African-American education and school desegregation in the 1950s.



McInteer Villa

Picture of property 1301 Kansas
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 1975-03-26

Architect: unknown
Category: single dwelling

Local contractor Owen E. Seip constructed this house in 1889-1890 for real estate magnate John McInteer. The red-brick house is two-and-a-half stories and features a dominant corner tower commonly found on Queen Anne-style residences. It is significant for its architecture and McInteer's contributions to Atchison's commercial history.



Mount Saint Scholastica Convent

Picture of property 801 S 8th St
Atchison (Atchison County)
Listed in National Register 1972-04-13

Architect: unknown
Category: church school; church-related residence

Mount St. Scholastica Convent was constructed in 1901. Originally established in 1863, the convent had outgrown its original facility. The U-shaped building is designed with Renaissance and Gothic architectural details. It is constructed of brick with limestone door and window accents. The building houses both a convent and chapel, which is an excellent example of Gothic Revival architecture with its buttresses and towers. The building was nominated for its architecture.



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