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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Douglas
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Page 3 of 10 showing 10 records of 98 total, starting on record 21
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Douglas County Courthouse

Picture of property Massachusetts and 11th Sts.
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1975-04-14

Architect: John Haskell
Category: courthouse



Duncan, Charles, House

Picture of property 933 Tennessee
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1986-06-05

Architect: unknown
Category: single dwelling



Dyche Hall

Picture of property KU Campus
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1974-07-14

Architect: Root & Siemens
Category: museum



East Lawrence Industrial Historic District

Picture of property See District Properties List
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2007-12-11

Architect: unknown
Category: vacant/not in use; manufacturing facility



Eldridge House Hotel

Picture of property Seventh and Massachusetts
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1986-12-01

Architect: C. Shepard, A. Wiser
Category: hotel



Eldridge, Shalor, House

Picture of property 945 Rhode Island
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in State Register 1981-08-10

Architect: Charles Shepard & Alben Wiser
Category: single dwelling



English Lutheran Church

Picture of property 1040 New Hampshire Street
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1995-07-28

Architect: John Haskell
Category: religious facility



Fernand-Strong House

Picture of property 1515 University Drive
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2008-07-02

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling

The Fernand-Strong House is located near the University of Kansas main campus on land first claimed by one of the prominent early settlers of Lawrence, James S. Emery. The wood frame, Italianate-style main block was constructed about 1872 and includes a large historic addition (ca. 1905). The property has a history intertwined with the university, and notable past owners of the house include former KU Chancellor Frank Strong and James Naismith, the inventor of the game of basketball. The property is nominated for its associations with local development and Chancellor Strong.



First United Methodist Church of Lawrence Oregon-California Trail Segment

Picture of property 867 US-40 Hwy
Lawrence vicinity (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2016-04-05

Architect: Not Applicable
Category: road-related; transportation

This 0.6-acre remnant of the Oregon and California trails network is part of the eastern (beginning) section of the combined trail, which emigrants passed over on the first few days of their journey west. One of the most important resources in this initial portion of the trail was Big Springs, a reliable water source lying approximately nine miles west of these two swales. Active between 1840 and circa 1860, these swales were nominated under Criterion A for their association with transportation and exploration/settlement along the combined route of the Oregon and California trails. This site's associative significance and similarity to related trail sites suggest that associated artifact assemblages may be present; they were therefore also nominated under Criterion D. Due to current transportation developments within the immediate vicinity, this site is all that remains of a larger segment.



French, Charles & Elizabeth Haskell, House

Picture of property 1300 Haskell Avenue
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2012-10-09

Architect: unknown
Category: single dwelling

Charles and Elizabeth Haskell French settled on the outskirts of Lawrence and built this house over many years beginning in 1869. The residence is one of three in a row along present-day Haskell Avenue that once belonged to the well-known Haskell family, which arrived with the town's earliest settlers from New England in 1854. Elizabeth's brother was architect John Haskell, and he may have played a role in the design and construction of his sister's house. This gable-front-and-wing dwelling reflects the National Folk house type that was popular in the mid- and late-19th century. National Folk houses descend from earlier folk building traditions in eastern and southern parts of the United States, but were constructed with industrially produced lumber, roofing, and nails which were transported on the railroad network. National Folk houses are further categorized by form and/or floor plan. In addition to the gable-front-and-wing, examples in Lawrence include the I-house, hall-and-parlor, and pyramidal house types. It was nominated for its local significance in the area of architecture.



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