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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Wyandotte
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Page 3 of 5 showing 10 records of 49 total, starting on record 21
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Meeks, Cordell D., Sr., House

Picture of property 600 Oakland Avenue
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2013-10-09

Architect: Unknown
Category: domestic

Since its construction in 1903, the residence at 600 Oakland Avenue has been home to two distinguished Kansas City attorneys - first to Charles W. Trickett, a white Republican prohibitionist, and his family; and second to Cordell D. Meeks, Sr., an African American Democrat county commissioner and district court judge, and his family. Trickett is perhaps best known professionally for his efforts as an assistant attorney general to enforce Kansas prohibition laws in the early 1900s. After his death, Trickett's family sold the house in 1949 to a young Meeks who became a leader in local Democratic Party politics. Meetings of the Northeast Democrat Committeemen and Committeewomen's League were held in this home for years. Meeks was sworn in to the Wyandotte County Commission in 1951 and served as a commissioner until 1973 when he became the first African American elected to the District Court in the State of Kansas. The property was nominated for its association with Meeks in the areas of politics and government.



Northeast Junior High School

Picture of property 400 Troup Ave
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2008-10-16

Architect: Rose & Peterson; Radotinsky, Meyn, Deardorf (1961)
Category: school

The Northeast Junior High School is a four-story masonry structure constructed in 1923 as the first intermediate school to serve Kansas City's African-American population. Rose and Peterson Architects designed the building, which had the same floor plan as Northwest Junior High built in 1922 to serve the area's white students. These twin schools were indicative of Kansas City's citywide educational segregation that extended from the first grade through junior college. The building is nominated for its educational history and architectural significance constructed during the Progressive-era in a commercial style with Beaux Arts stylistic influences.



Quindaro Townsite

Picture of property Generally bounded by 31st St., Sewell Ave., 21st. St, and the Missouri-Pacific RR
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2002-05-22

Architect: Not listed
Category: archaeological site

The townsite of Quindaro was initially occupied by Euro-Americans in 1857 and essentially ceased to exist in 1862. However, the area of Quindaro, as it was originally platted, was subsequently settled by African-Americans and also saw the establishment of educational and healthcare institutions associated with this same community. This nomination includes a total of 26 major features, including the foundation remains of 20 buildings, two outbuildings, three wells, and one cistern associaed with Quindaro townsite.



Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch

Picture of property Mt. Marty Park, near Booth and Drexel
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 1977-08-02

Architect: John Leroy Marshall
Category: monument/marker



Sauer Castle

Picture of property 935 Shawnee Drive
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 1977-08-02

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling



Schleifer-McAlpine House

Picture of property 608 Splitlog Ave
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2007-10-10

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling

The Schleifer-McAlpine House was built in 1870 as an Italianate-style two-story brick residence on a limestone foundation with a two-story wraparound front porch. Between 1870 and 1925, two prominent citizens, Louis Schleifer and Nicholas McAlpine, both of who were successful businessmen and public officials, occupied the house. Schleifer operated a brickyard company with his brother Fred, which produced materials for many of the buildings in Kansas City from 1867 to 1880. Schleifer and McAlpine were involved in local politics, serving as a Wyandotte City Councilmen. One of McAlpine's most important involvements was that he was one of eight partners in the Kansas City, Kansas Town Company. The company was formed in 1868 to plat and develop the portion of Wyandotte County lying in the river bottoms between the Kansas-Missouri state line on the east, the Missouri River on the north, and the Kansas River on the west. The house was nominated for its architectural significance and for its association with community planning, development and government.



Scottish Rite Temple

Picture of property 803 North 7th
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 1985-09-11

Architect: William Rose
Category: clubhouse



Shafer, Theodore, House

Picture of property 2518 North 10th Street
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2000-02-18

Architect: Not listed
Category: single dwelling



Shawnee Street Overpass

Picture of property northwest of I-35
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 1984-03-08

Architect: Not listed
Category: road-related



Simmons Funeral Home

Picture of property 1404 S 37th Street
Kansas City (Wyandotte County)
Listed in National Register 2014-01-08

Architect: Wilson, Fred S.
Category: other

The Simmons Funeral Home in Kansas City was constructed in 1927 to serve as Dr. David E. Clopper's 20-room hospital. Clopper was an instrumental figure in Argentine, serving as mayor, president of the Argentine State Bank, and worked for many years as a surgeon for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. Upon his death in 1935, George Simmons and his son Gib purchased and refurbished the building for use as a mortuary. They had been in business since 1895 and would eventually expand the funeral home to adapt to business and industry changes. Five generations of the Simmons family worked in this building until the business was sold in 2007. The building was designed by Kansas City architect Fred S. Wilson in the Mission and Craftsman styles. Elements of these styles exhibited on this building include the low-pitched clay tile roof, terra cotta and cast concrete ornamentation, tall casement windows, and decorative iron ornamentation. The building was nominated for its local significance in the areas of architecture and commerce.



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