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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Douglas
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Page 6 of 10 showing 10 records of 100 total, starting on record 51
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Morse, Dr. Frederic D., House

Picture of property 1041 Tennessee Street
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1991-04-18

Architect: unknown
Category: single dwelling



Mugan-Olmsted House

Picture of property 819 Avalon Rd.
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2017-03-27

Architect: Patrick Mugan
Category: single dwelling

The Mugan-Olmsted House is significant as an example of a residence that evolved during development patterns associated with the growth of Lawrence between 1866 and 1956. Patrick Mugan, a trained stonemason, built the first portion of the house around 1866 as a gable-front dwelling. The house was soon expanded, taking on a gable-front-and-wing form. This form was a common building type in the mid-1800s and the two-story version was mostly popular in the northeastern and midwestern states. The Mugan-Olmsted House is atypical in this form due to its construction of stone rather than wood, which was more common. The house continued to change through its ownership by the Mugan and Olmsted families, acquiring a front porch, south sunporch, interior bathrooms, and millwork.



North Rhode Island St Historic Residential District

Picture of property 700-1144, 901-1047, 1201-1215 Rhode Island St.
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2004-07-14

Architect: Not listed
Category: domestic; meeting hall



Oak Hill Cemetery

Picture of property 1605 Oak Hill Avenue
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2017-07-10

Architect: Holland Wheeler
Category: cemetery

Oak Hill Cemetery was incorporated during a critical moment of identity for the City of Lawrence, Kansas. Still reeling from Quantrill’s Raid, which destroyed much of the fledgling city in 1863, Oak Hill was founded in part to act as a memorial to the citizens killed in the Raid and in part to establish Lawrence as a settled and sophisticated city on the edge of America’s frontier. Oak Hill is significant both for its connection to the Civil War, Bleeding Kansas, and Quantrill’s Raid and for its place in the urban development of Lawrence, Kansas. Furthermore, as a designed public landscape, majorly attributable to the single hand of Holland Wheeler, an important figure in the development of Lawrence, Oak Hill is a masterful example of Rural Cemetery design in the Midwest.



Old Castle Hall

Picture of property 513 Fifth Street
Baldwin City (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1971-02-24

Architect: unknown
Category: college



Old Lawrence City Library

Picture of property northwest corner, Ninth & Vermont
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1975-02-18

Architect: George Berlinghof
Category: library



Old West Lawrence Historic District

Picture of property major portion bounded by Sixth and Eighth Streets and Tennessee and Indiana Streets
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 1972-02-23

Architect: N/A
Category: residential district



Oread Historic District

Picture of property Roughly between W 9th & 12th Sts. & the Alleys behind Louisiana & Kentucky Sts.
Lawrence (Douglas County)
Listed in National Register 2007-10-10

Architect: Not listed
Category: domestic; religious facility; education related

Located directly west of the downtown commercial area and east of the University of Kansas campus, the majority of the Oread Historic District falls within the Original town plat, and thus represents one of Lawrence's oldest residential neighborhoods. Not only did it provide easy access to downtown and campus, several churches were either adjacent or located within its boundaries. Central School and later a high school were located on the two south corners of Kentucky and 9th streets. The district contains a variety of residences that represent changing tastes, fashions, and construction methods in American architecture. There are good examples of the large fashionable homes, several more modest National Folk type residences of the working class, and later examples of residential styles that were popular in the early twentieth century.



Palmyra Masonic Lodge

Picture of property 602, 604 High Street
Baldwin City (Douglas County)
Listed in State Register 2011-05-14

Architect: Unknown
Category: commerce

Palmyra Masonic Lodge was one of the first Masonic Lodges in Kansas Territory, holding its first meetings in 1856 in the "open air."It was granted a charter in 1859, and, until the late 1860s, the lodge met on the third floor of Baker University's "College Building" (now known as Old Castle). The Masons then partnered with the local Odd Fellows organization to build a frame building that they leased to other organizations for meeting space. A fire destroyed the building in 1891, and it took the nearly three years to rebuild. The new Italianate building was dedicated on June 26, 1894. Like other fraternal buildings of that era, the first floor was designed to lease to local businesses. The second floor was divided into two principal spaces, a lodge room on the south end and a dining room on the north. Since the 1960s, the building has primarily been used for storage. The building was nominated for its social and commercial history.



Palmyra Post Office

Picture of property 511 5th St.
Baldwin City (Douglas County)
Listed in State Register 2017-11-18

Architect: Unknown
Category: commerce

Built in 1857, the old Palmyra Post Office is the only extant resource associated with the short-lived town of Palmyra. From June 1857 to May 1862, this building functioned as a post office along the Santa Fe Trail. The building was relocated at least three times since the early 1900s, finally settling into its current location in the 1980s. Although its relocation precludes its listing in the National Register, this building is important to the early history of Douglas County as a remaining resource from Palmyra and the Santa Fe Trail.



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