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National and State Registers of Historic Places

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County: Gray
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Page 1 of 1 showing 5 records of 5 total, starting on record 1


Barton, Welborn 'Doc', House

Picture of property 202 S Edwards Street
Ingalls (Gray County)
Listed in National Register 2010-01-07

Architect: unknown
Category: vacant/not in use; secondary structure; single dwelling; storage

Built in about 1880, the Barton House is a unique combination of common late nineteenth century house forms and styles. The National Folk form is expressed in the house's symmetry and in the multiple exterior doors, while the Victorian form is expressed in the chamfered exterior walls. The Victorian style is expressed in the interior and exterior wood trim and the original front porch details. One of the most unique features of the Barton House is the presence of eight exterior doorways within the original configuration - a five-room, 850 square-foot plan. Each room has at least one door to the outside. It was common for some types of Folk buildings to feature two front doors, including the double-pen, the dogtrot, and the I-house, although the reasons for the multiple doors varies with the region and type of house. In addition to its unique architecture, the house was home to early western Kansas cattleman Welborn 'Doc' Barton, who built the home in Cimarron and moved to its current location in Ingalls in 1896. Barton lived in the house until his death in 1946. It was nominated for its association with Barton and as a unique example of Folk Victorian architecture.



Cimarron Hotel

Picture of property 203 North Main
Cimarron (Gray County)
Listed in National Register 1983-02-10

Architect: Not listed
Category: hotel; resort

Constructed in response to the increased settlement in the area, the Cimarron Hotel was built in 1886 as an investment by Judge N.B. Klaine of Dodge City. Architect John Opp designed the three-story brick hotel in the Second Empire style. Key elements that represent the style are the mansard roof and arched windows. The hotel was also a sanitarium, but returned to a hotel in the early 1900s and is in continuous use today. It was nominated for its architecture.



Gray County Courthouse (Old)

Picture of property 117 S. Main
Cimarron (Gray County)
Listed in National Register 2009-11-04

Architect: Unknown
Category: department store; specialty store; courthouse; multiple dwelling; meeting hall

This two-story brick commercial building in downtown Cimarron was at the center of a heated county seat dispute in 1889. When Gray County was established in 1887, Cimarron was designated the temporary county seat. Nearby Ingalls also sought permanent county seat status and in an election on October 31, 1887, both towns claimed victory. Accusations of buying votes and ballotbox stuffing were slung back and forth. The Kansas Supreme Court eventually declared Cimarron the winner. The building that would serve as Gray County's first courthouse was one of only a few permanent masonry buildings in Cimarron at the time. The county leased the building in January of 1888. One year later, a group of men from Ingalls raided the courthouse and stole the county records leaving three men dead in the bloody gunfight. Despite this setback, the county continued to operate in Cimarron. The present courthouse, which dates to 1927, is located two blocks south of this building. The Old Gray County Courthouse was nominated for its association with the history of early Cimarrron history and its role in the 1889 Gray County Seat War.



Soule Canal - Gray County Segment 1

Picture of property NE 1/4 Sec. 1, Twp. 26S, Range 29W
Ingalls (Gray County)
Listed in National Register 2014-10-15

Architect: N/A
Category: irrigation facility

The Soule Canal, also known as the Eureka Canal, was a 96-mile-long earthen ditch constructed in the late 19th century to carry water from the Arkansas River to farms in southwest Kansas for irrigation purposes. Plans for its construction were conceived by brothers John and George Gilbert, and the project was financed by Asa Soule, a native of Rochester, New York who made his millions manufacturing and selling hop bitters. Construction of the canal began in April 1884 and was completed in 1889. It took two years, 60 horses, 150 men, and between $250,000 and $1 million to dig the channel that stretched from Ingalls in Gray County to Spearville in Ford County. The canal was a complete failure, due in part to the nature of its construction, including a risk of side slopes collapsing and water loss due to seepage, and the fact that there was nobody in charge of maintaining it. Attempts to revive the canal in 1909 and 1931 were unsuccessful. This segment nearest Ingalls is the westernmost extant portion of the canal located nearest the long-buried sump or collecting pool that was adjacent to the Arkansas River southeast of Ingalls. The site includes a remnant of the early 20th century alignment of U.S. Highway 50, which cuts through the west edge of the canal structure. The roadbed and associated roadway elements illustrate a considerable obstacle to the efforts to revive the canal in the early 20th century, thus ending future attempts to utilize the ditch for irrigation purposes. It was nominated for its association with agriculture, community planning and development, and engineering.



Soule Canal - Gray County Segment 2

Picture of property Sec. 6, Twp. 26S, Range 28W
Ingalls (Gray County)
Listed in National Register 2014-10-15

Architect: N/A
Category: irrigation facility

The Soule Canal, also known as the Eureka Canal, was a 96-mile-long earthen ditch constructed in the late 19th century to carry water from the Arkansas River to farms in southwest Kansas for irrigation purposes. Plans for its construction were conceived by brothers John and George Gilbert, and the project was financed by Asa Soule, a native of Rochester, New York who made his millions manufacturing and selling hop bitters. Construction of the canal began in April 1884 and was completed in 1889. It took two years, 60 horses, 150 men, and between $250,000 and $1 million to dig the channel that stretched from Ingalls in Gray County to Spearville in Ford County. The canal was a complete failure, due in part to the nature of its construction, including a risk of side slopes collapsing and water loss due to seepage, and the fact that there was nobody in charge of maintaining it. Attempts to revive the canal in 1909 and 1931 were unsuccessful. This segment includes two distinct portions of the canal located adjacent to the north of U.S. Highway 50 east of Ingalls. This segment was nominated for its significance in the areas of agriculture, community planning and development, and engineering.



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