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American Federation of Musicians of the U.S. and Canada

Local 36-665 (Topeka, Kans.)

Manuscript Collection No. 798

 

IntroductionPhotograph of Knights of Pythias Band, Topeka, KS, 1902

Abstract

Musicians’ union local, founded in 1896 as the Topeka Musical Association; merged with African American Local 665 in 1968; name changed in 1988 to American Federation of Musicians, Local 36 - 665; ceased operation in 1993. Of Topeka, Kan.

This collection was created by various Topeka Musical Association/American Federation of Musicians, Local 36-665 (TMA/AFM), secretary - treasurers, whose duties included attending all meetings; keeping correct minutes of the proceedings; receiving communications; answering communications; receiving applications; transferring cards for membership; collecting all dues & fines; and keeping an accurate account of said dues, disbursements & cash income. The Minutes include general, special, & Executive Board meetings and contain information on wage scales, local & international union business matters, member benefits & services, discipline & sanctions, finances, elections, and lobbying efforts. The Administrative series defines what TMA/AFM was as an organization. The Financial series focuses on monetary affairs. The Election and Union Information series includes election protocols, ballots, workbooks and a historical resume. Members’ Records focuses on the members themselves in regards to dues, contracts and correspondence.

Dates

1896-1993

Quantity

6 ft.
2 oversize files
2 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

Creator

American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada.Local 36-665 (Topeka, Kan.)

Titles

American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada, Local 36-665 (Topeka, Kan.), records

Portion of title: Records

Other title: Topeka Musical Association records

Identification

Ms. collection no. 798.

Language

Text is in English.

Notes

This finding aid describes materials held by the Kansas Historical Society. Materials may be used in the State Archives and Library during regular research hours. That part of the collection on microfilm may also be borrowed through interlibrary loan for your use at a participating public, academic, or research library. Information on interlibrary loan is available from the Kansas Historical Society and on its web site, http://www.kshs.org. Support for telephone, mail, and online reference and research is limited.

In a continuing effort to improve the completeness and accuracy of finding aids, revisions are made as more or new information becomes available. Consequently finding aids in paper format, on microfilm, and on the Society’s web site may differ slightly.

Repository

Kansas Historical Society (Topeka)

History

Known throughout most of its existence as the Topeka Musical Association, Local 36 - 665 has served as the Topeka - area musicians’ union since 1896. Formed on 27 December of that year, the group immediately sought and won recognition from the American Federation of Musicians (A. F. of M., now the American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada) as Local 36.

The Topeka Musical Association may have been the first attempt to organize musicians in the city. There was an earlier organization named the Topeka Musical Union, started in 1869, that had use of Union Hall and regularly performed concerts in the 1870s, but no evidence has been found to determine whether it was purely a performance organization or if it attempted to negotiate on behalf of its members.

Early in Local 36’s existence, there were decisions to be made about whom to admit to membership, writing a constitution and bylaws, developing and revising a fee schedule, electing delegates to A. F. of M. meetings, contact with other unions, and related internal matters.

Throughout the Local’s history, there have been recurring situations needing attention. Among these are the ongoing problem of members playing in violation of established fees or mixing with non-union musicians, employers hiring non-union musicians or groups in violation of previous agreements, handling grievances and complaints filed against employers and Local members, allowing concessions in rates for specific reasons, and the extent to which the Local would affiliate with other unions in Topeka. Local 36 - 665 usually supported other A. F. of M. locals when called upon and in addition often assisted locals of other unions. On many occasions, the Local lobbied local officials on behalf of causes that were important to the Union, either nationally or locally. Disciplining members and sanctioning those who violated Union rules occupied much of the Local’s time. Because of the advantages musicians saw in joining, for many years the Local attracted a steady stream of new members and sometimes entire bands or other ensembles.

Major issues affecting the Local early in the twentieth century included deciding whether or not to affiliate with the Trades Council in Topeka; negotiating with motion picture theaters who wanted to substitute organists for larger numbers of musicians; increasing involvement with boycotts of non-union businesses in Topeka; relating with other unions in Topeka; forging relationships with military bands during World War I; improving working conditions in Topeka; attempting to extend union influence in commerce; dealing with the importation of musicians from other cities; investigating complaints against members and employers; monitoring musical groups from non-profit organizations such as schools, colleges, and prisons playing in public events; and dealing with a royalty lawsuit by the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers.

In the 1920s, the Local purchased a building for offices but later sold it. The Local also dealt with orchestras in theaters being replaced by organists due to decreased business, created the position of business agent, responded to attempts to replace musicians in theaters by recorded music, coped as best it could with the Great Depression of the 1930s and the resulting decrease in membership and finances, and integrated new Social Security and labor laws and regulations into its practices.

As the Depression ended and the United States entered World War II, there were continuing disputes with stagehands and their union, adjustments in death benefits that had to be made due to members in military service, consideration of raising scale in response to better economic conditions, the problem of co-existence with military bands, and a move out of Marshall’s Band quarters and into Union Hall. After the War, playing at radio stations was becoming more prevalent, and the Local assisted members who suffered damage in the 1951 flood that ravaged Topeka and the Midwest.

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Local suffered as a result of a decline in ballroom dancing, but this was partially offset by members playing for radio and television advertisements. The Kansas Right to Work Law, its effects, and its implementation were major concerns of the Local in this period.

The year 1967 saw continuing negotiations with Local 665, the Topeka African American A. F. of M. local, concerning a merger; agreement was reached by mid-year and ratified in November. Under its terms, the new local would be numbered 36 - 665 and the name Topeka Musical Association retained. The local’s jurisdiction, which had varied over the years due to the presence or absence of other locals and other factors, in 1967 included Anderson, Coffey, Jackson, Lyon, Nemaha, Osage, Shawnee, and Wabaunsee counties. The merger of locals 36 and 665 took effect 1 January 1968.

In the early 1970s, as union influence waned, there was an increasing problem of employers hiring of non-union musicians. Within a few years, the Local was forced to exist in an environment in which its powers were limited to providing information and persuasion and not the coercion commonplace in earlier years.

The Local experienced much turmoil in 1974 due to a contested election. There were charges and counter charges, calls for an investigation of the election by the International Union, a complete change of officers, and apparent lingering resentment.

In the late 1970s, the popularity of discotheques (“discos”) with recorded music hurt the live music scene. In addition, the union faced continuing problems with the Topeka Civic Symphony (now the Topeka Symphony Orchestra) that did not pay members. There were attempts to increase the Local’s membership.

The organization changed its official name in 1988 from Topeka Musical Association to American Federation of Musicians, Local 36 - 665. Membership, at one time as high as 250, declined to about 100, and the Local’s influence on the Topeka musical community declined as well; it was estimated that 60 per cent of bands in the late 1980s were non-union. In the early 1990s, the Local experienced severe financial problems. Its membership dropped to under 100. Local 36 - 665 continued to represent musicians in the Topeka region until 8 November 1993 when mounting financial problems forced it to surrender its charter. At that time, the jurisdiction of the Manhattan Musicians’ Association, Local 169, was enlarged to include those areas formerly served by Local 36 - 665.

Scope and Content

The Minutes, 1896 through 1993, series, no. 1 , was created by various Topeka Musical Association / American Federation of Musicians (TMA / AFM) secretary - treasurers, whose duties included attending all meetings, keeping correct minutes of the proceedings, receiving communications, answering communications, receiving applications, transferring cards for membership, collecting all dues and fines and keeping an accurate account of said dues, disbursements and cash income. This series is on microfilm, MF 7190 - MF 7191.

The Minutes include general, special, and Executive Board meetings and contain information on wage scales, local and international union business matters, member benefits and services, discipline and sanctions, finances, elections, and lobbying efforts. The minutes during the first years often include financial reports, records of new members, and information about annual dues. Sometimes minutes of meetings of State and national American Federation of Musicians (A. F. of M.) bodies are included as is some correspondence.

These records illustrate the changing popular taste in music, or more specifically types of musical performances. Recitals and performances in private homes as well as public places early in the twentieth century gave way to the popularity of motion pictures and music heard over the radio. In turn, musical accompaniment at the movies evolved from live groups to a single organist to recordings and films with sound. Music at dances changed after World War II from almost exclusively live bands to records. Counterbalancing these trends were musicians hired for radio, television, and recorded advertising.

Until 1967, minutes of general meetings and the Executive Board were interfiled; the Board met between general meetings to conduct business. For items dated 1967 through 1973, each yearly file of minutes is organized so that the minutes of general meetings precede those of the Executive Board. From 1974 through 1981, general, special, and Board minutes were interfiled in chronological order. The minutes for the years 1982 through 1993 are divided into two groups for general and Executive Board meetings, reflecting the records’ differing origins as explained below.

Minutes from the late 1970s and early 1980s lack detail; to compensate, some member newsletters have been attached to the minutes. Minutes 1970 through 1973, including financial reports, were interfiled with correspondence. Beginning in 1988, minutes were filed with the records of the meeting when they were read, usually the next meeting. The 1982 through 1993 Executive Board minutes were actually agendas and personal notes kept by Secretary and President Gilbert Anderson.

The Administrative series dated from 1896 through 1993 defines what TMA / AFM was as an organization. The Constitution and By-laws (1947) states, “the object of this Association is to unite the instrumental portion of the City of Topeka for the better protection of its interests in general; establish and maintain rate of prices to be charged by members for their professional services; enforce good faith and fair dealings between its members, and endeavor to raise the standard of musicianship of its members to the highest possible degree.” This series includes varying versions of Constitutions and By-laws according the needs of the organization, correspondence, contracts, certificates and hearings. Items in the correspondence folders are arranged chronologically.

There are four subseries within the Administrative series:

The first, entitled the Musicians Ordinance, covers an ordinance written in 1943 denying the hiring of musicians under the age of 18. Secretary - Treasurer Gilbert Anderson wrote to newspapers and the City Council to get the ordinance changed. Typed copies rewording the ordinance are included, as well as, a copy of the Topeka Council Agenda from 23 December 1985 noting that the new ordinance was passed 7 - 2.

The second subseries includes a lawsuit between the Mid-America Fair Association and the American Federation of Musicians. AFM had placed the Fair Association on the “unfair list” when they failed to hire the minimum number of performers as agreed upon for the years 1969 and 1970. To clear the matter the Fair Association and AFM made the agreement that the Fair would employ no less than 23 professional musicians “to be dispersed by the contractor.”

The third subseries includes the Music Performance Trust Funds (MPTF), dated between 1975 and 1993. This public service organization administering trusts was established in 1948 and continued until the present by a series of labor agreements between producers in the recording industry and the American Federation of Musicians. The sole purpose of the MPTF is to “promote the appreciation and knowledge of good, live music.” The criterion includes quality of performance and creative programming. Included in the subseries is an Orientation Script and Slide Show describing MPTF and what its role is in the music community.

The fourth, and final subseries is a “Notice to Members (Local 36 - 665 Death Benefit Fund),” [between 1978 and 1980]. The Death Benefit Fund was created for members of good standing within the association to help defray the cost of funeral expenses or other expenses the family may endure. This particular “Notice to Members” contains information about the Local’s Death Benefit Fund and a disclosure mandated by the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). The Notice includes the names of the Fund’s administrators and relevant provisions of the Local’s Constitution and By-laws. Included are typescript originals and reduced - size photocopies used for duplication. This subseries is on microfilm MF 7191 as Series 2.

The third series is Finances, 1897 - 1948 (microfilm), 1969 - 1993 (bulk 1969 - 1993). This series focuses on the financial aspects of the organization. The elected secretary - treasurer’s responsibilities included maintaining the Association’s funds and records. The financial records 1897 through 1948 are included with the minutes (Series 1) on microfilm rolls MF 7190 - MF 7191. The original records, 1969 - 1993, include Auditing Reports, individual Year End Reports, Auditing Committee Records covering each year’s cash income (dues and fees), Disbursements (expenses paid), Cash Income Ledgers, Death Benefits Paid and Interest Accrued from Investments. Other financial records include Monthly Financial Reports, Tax Returns and Per Capita Dues.

While financial records between 1897 and 1948 are included in the minutes, the bulk of the records reflect the years between 1969 and 1993. In accordance with the Union’s records retention schedule in effect at the time, the Ledgers between 1948 and 1969 were destroyed; however, a single folder entitled Auditing Reports, 1948 - 1969, was retained for local purposes. Auditing Reports between 1969 and 1993 match the financial records found in the Ledgers dated the same years. Following basic accounting procedures, the Ledgers are reversed chronologically, while the Auditing Reports are chronological. A correlation between Cash Income Ledgers and the Member Dues Ledgers is also evident.

Election and Union Information is the fourth series in the collection. According to AFM’s By - laws, elective officers are elected annually and hold office until successors have been elected and installed. Strict election protocols must be followed to maintain the credibility of the election. Members can file a complaint if election provisions within the By - laws have been violated.

A variety of Union Guideline Workbooks are included in this series, each one covering how local chapters should handle the intricasies within a local union. These workbooks cover local recordings, symphonies, support services and employment in the Union. An interesting addition to this series is the AFL - CIO Kansas Resume by the Kansas State Federation of Labor, which covers Kansas history, religion, employment and includes a union chapter index.

The bulk of this series contains sealed election ballots dated in 1974 and 1988 though 1993. As per Union retention schedules, all other ballots are destroyed after one year. Information about conducting union elections is chronologically reversed. The workbooks are arranged by subject.

The fifth and final series in the collection is Members’ Records and dates from 1934 through 1993. According the By - laws, membership was open to all professional instrumental performers sixteen years of age or older who were citizens of the United States upon application to the Board of Directors and recommendation by a member in good standing. Members were expected to perform according to provisions within the TMA / AFM Constitution and By-laws.

The secretary - treasurer maintained Ledgers of Receipts for Dues, correspondence, contract information, and performance / venue records. The six Receipts for Dues Ledgers date from 1972 through 1991, but there are gaps for the years 1980 - 1982 and 1983 - 1987; the carbon receipts within are chronologically reversed. Items in correspondence and contract information are arranged chronologically. The Membership Ledgers, Contact Information Cards, and Venue / Performer Indexes are arranged alphabetically.

There are two subseries within Series 5. The first includes three Membership Ledgers; each of them seems to start at around 1934 and continues through 1966, and each is arranged alphabetically. It is unclear why there are three separate ledgers within this time span, or why there are no others following 1966. The ledgers record each member’s contact information, instrument(s) played, and Association status (dues paid, violation fees, suspensions, reinstatements, and death benefits paid). Because these ledgers contain individual Social Security numbers, the volumes have been removed from the collection, placed in secure storage, and are available only with Social Security numbers of living individuals redacted (42 U.S.C. 408(a)(8)). The second subseries is a Welcome to New Members Slide Presentation Script, revised in 1978. The slide presentation gives basic background information about the AFM, what is expected of new members, and how being a member of the Association will benefit their musical careers.

Contents List

Organization of the Records

Organized into 5 series by function.

Due to the nature of union association rules, the collection has passed through a variety of secretary - treasurers, each of whom had a unique filing style. Once a new secretary - treasurer had been elected, the outgoing secretary - treasurer was required to prepare a physical inventory list, box the items and send them to the new officer. A copy of a physical inventory list that had been misfiled was found in the collection, revealing that the collection’s original order has not been maintained, and some items in the list are no longer in the collection. With the exception of Series 1 (on microfilm), all of the folders have been arranged chronologically within their respective series. All attempts were made to maintain original order at the item level.

Contents: Ser. 1. Minutes, 1896-1993 (microfilm MF 7190-MF 7191) - ser. 2. Administrative, 1896-1993 (Boxes 1, 6) - ser. 3. Finances, 1897-1948, 1969-1993 (Boxes 2-3) - ser. 4. Election & union information, 1974-1993 (Boxes 3, 6) - ser. 5. Members’ records, 1934-1966 (Boxes 4-5, 6).

Series 1. MINUTES, 1896 - 1993. 2 microfilm reels ; 35 mm. MICROFILM: MF 7190-MF 7191.

Minutes, 1 ft. (16 items), of general, special, executive, and Executive Board minutes containing information on topics such as a minimum wage schedule (scale), constitution & bylaws creation & revision, benefits & services to members, discipline and sanctions, communications with the International Union, financial matters, elections, and lobbying & other educational efforts.

Arranged chronologically, thereunder by type of meeting.

Microfilm Box #
Series # Name
Item #
Title / Name
Dates

MF 7190

01 Minutes

1

General, special, executive, and Board meetings

Dec. 27, 1896 – Oct. 5, 1909

MF 7190

01 Minutes

2

General, special, and Board meetings

Jan. 12, 1915 – Dec. 6, 1925

MF 7190

01 Minutes

3

General, special, and Board meetings

Jan. 3, 1926 – Feb. 5, 1939

MF 7190

01 Minutes

4

General meetings

1938 – 1956

MF 7191

01 Minutes

5

General meetings

1957 – 1966

MF 7191

01 Minutes

6

General and Board meetings

1967

MF 7191

01 Minutes

7

General and Board meetings

1968

MF 7191

01 Minutes

8

General and Board meetings

1969

MF 7191

01 Minutes

9

General and Board meetings

1970

MF 7191

01 Minutes

10

General and Board meetings

1971

MF 7191

01 Minutes

11

General and Board meetings

1972

MF 7191

01 Minutes

12

General and Board meetings

1973

MF 7191

01 Minutes

13

General and Board meetings

1974

MF 7191

01 Minutes

14

General and Board meetings

1975 – 1982

MF 7191

01 Minutes

15

General meetings

1982 – 1993

MF 7191

01 Minutes

16

Board Meetings

1982 – 1993

Series 2. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS, 1896-1993. 1 ft. (31 folders) + oversize (1 folder) + 2 microfilm reels. Box 1 (110-01-03-03), Microfilm MF 7190-MF 7191.

This particular series defines what Topeka Musical Association, Local #36 - 665, American Federation of Musicians, was as an organization. Includes varying versions of Constitutions/By-laws, correspondence, contracts, certificates and hearings. Items in the correspondence folders are arranged chronologically.

Folders in the box are arranged in reverse chronological order; for convenience, the folder list below lists the folders alphabetically by title except for the 4 significant subseries, described below, found at the end of the list.

Subseries 1. Musicians’ Ordinance, 1985. 1 folder. Box 1.

An ordinance written in 1943 denied the hiring of musicians under the age of 18. Apparently the ordinance had been ignored for years until the Topeka Police Department started citing performance halls for hiring underage performers. Gilbert Anderson wrote to newspapers and the City Council to get the ordinance changed. Typed copies rewording the ordinance are included, as well as a copy of the Topeka Council agenda from Dec. 23, 1985, noting the new ordinance passed 7-2.

Subseries 2. Mid-America Fair Association v. American Federation Of Musicians, 1971. 1 folder. Box 1.

The Mid-America Fair Association brought American Federation of Musicians (AFM) into the District Court of Shawnee County. AFM had placed the Mid-America Fair Association on the “unfair list” when they failed to hire the minimum number of performers as agreed upon for the years 1969 and 1970. To clear the matter the Fair Association and AFM made the agreement that the Fair would employ no less than 23 professional musicians “to be dispersed by the contractor.”

Subseries 3: Music Performance Trust Funds (MPTF), 1975-1993. 2 items. Box 1 (Script and Slide in Box 6).

A public service organization administering trusts established in 1948 and continued until the present by a series of labor agreements between producers in the recording industry and the American Federation of Musicians. The sole purpose of the MPTF is to “promote the appreciation and knowledge of good, live music.” The criterion includes quality of performance, creative programming and following the “10 Commandments of Promoting Live Music.” Included in the subseries is a Orientation Script and Slide Show describing MPTF and what its role is in the music community.

Subseries 4. Notice To Members (Local 36-665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] . Partial microfilm reel. Microfilm MF 7191.

The Death Benefit Fund was created for members of good standing within the association to help defray the cost of funeral expenses or other expenses the family may endure. This particular “Notice to Members” contains information about the Local’s Death Benefit Fund and a disclosure mandated by the federal Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). The Notice includes the names of the Fund’s administrators and relevant provisions of the Local’s constitution and by-laws. Included are typescript originals and reduced-size photocopies used for duplication.

110-01-03-03
Box 1 of 6

Box #

Series #
Name

Folder #
Name / Title
Dates

Oversize

02 Administration

31

Certificates of Affiliation

1896 & 1968

1

02 Administration

24

Constitution & By-Laws

1970 & 1989

1

02 Administration

28

Constitution & By-Laws

1947 & 1951

1

02 Administration

2

Constitution & By-Laws

1989

1

02 Administration

16

Contract Material

1974-1977

1

02 Administration

10

Copyright Information

1976

1

02 Administration

20

Correspondence

1972

1

02 Administration

18

Correspondence

1973

1

02 Administration

26

Correspondence & By-Law notes

1970

1

02 Administration

8

Correspondence-Admissions Military

1978

1

02 Administration

15

Correspondence-Booking Agents

1974-1982

1

02 Administration

9

Correspondence-Contract Fines

1976

1

02 Administration

12

Correspondence-Defaulters

1975-1979

1

02 Administration

3

Correspondence-Live-PARLA

1988-1993

1

02 Administration

30

Correspondence-NEA

ND

1

02 Administration

27

Distinguished Service Awards

1969-1973

1

02 Administration

22

KS State Fed. Labor-Leg. Bulletins

1971

1

02 Administration

7

KS-MO Conference Topeka

1980

1

02 Administration

29

Letterheads

ND

1

02 Administration

14

Managers Removed from Defaulters List

1975-1977

1

02 Administration

25

Minutes & Correspondence

1970

1

02 Administration

23

Minutes & Correspondence

1971

1

02 Administration

19

Minutes & Correspondence

1972

1

02 Administration

17

Minutes & Correspondence

1973

1

02 Administration

13

Musicians Insurance Trust

1975-1977

1

02 Administration

11

Newsletters

1975-1989

1

02 Administration

1

Newsletters

1990-1993

1

02 Administration

6

Outstanding Achievement Awards

1983-1993

1

02 Administration

5

Ordinance for Young Musicians

1985

1

02 Administration

21

Mid-America Fair Court Case

1971

1

02 Administration

4

Music Performers Trust Funds

1987-1993

MICROFILM
MF 7910

02 Administration

 

Notice to Members (Local 36-665 Death Benefit Fund)

[between 1978 and 1980]

Series 3. FINANCES, 1897-1948, 1969-1993. 1.5 ft. (37 Items) + 1 microfilm reel. Boxes 2-3 (110-01-03-01 110-01-03-04), Microfilm MF 7190.

This series focuses on the financial aspects of the organization kept by the secretary-treasurer. Financial records, 1897-1948, are included in the minutes on microfilm roll MF 7190. The original records include Auditing Reports, Individual Year End Reports, Auditing Committee Records covering each year’s cash income (dues and fees), Disbursements (expenses paid), Cash Income Ledgers, Death Benefits Paid, and Interest Accrued from Investments. Other financial records include Monthly Financial Reports, Tax Returns and Per Capita Dues. While financial records between 1897 and 1948 are included in the microfilmed minutes, the bulk of the records reflect the years between 1969 and 1993. In accordance with the International Union’s records retention schedule at the time, the Ledgers between 1948 and1969 were destroyed 1-3 years after use; however, a single folder entitled Auditing Reports, 1948-1969, was retained for local purposes. Auditing Reports between 1969 and 1993 match the financial records found in the Ledgers dated between those years. Following basic accounting procedures, the Ledgers are reversed chronologically, while the Auditing Reports are chronological. A correlation between Cash Income Ledgers and the Member Dues ledgers is also evident.

Folders in each box are arranged in reverse chronological order; for convenience, the folder list below lists the folders alphabetically by title.

2006-170.01
110-01-03-01, Box 2 of 6
110-01-03-04, Box 3 of 6

Box #
Series #
Name
Folder #
Name/Title
Dates

2

03 Financial records

11

Annual Financial Report

1974-1975

2

03 Financial records

9

Annual Financial Report

1975-1976

2

03 Financial records

8

Annual Financial Report

1976-1977

2

03 Financial records

4

Annual Financial Report

1980-1981

2

03 Financial records

3

Annual Financial Report

1981-1982

2

03 Financial records

2

Annual Financial Report

1982-1983

3

03 Financial records

11

Annual Financial Report

1983-1984

3

03 Financial records

10

Annual Financial Report

1984-1985

3

03 Financial records

9

Annual Financial Report

1985-1986

3

03 Financial records

7

Annual Financial Report

1986-1987

3

03 Financial records

6

Annual Financial Report

1987-1988

3

03 Financial records

5

Annual Financial Report

1988-1989

3

03 Financial records

2

Annual Financial Report

1989-1990

3

03 Financial records

1

Annual Financial Report

1990-1991

2

03 Financial records

25

Auditing Committee Reports

1948-1969

3

03 Financial records

12

Auditing Committee Reports

1982-1993

2

03 Financial records

23

Cash Income Records Ledger

1967-1976

2

03 Financial records

7

Cash Income Records Ledger

1976-1988

3

03 Financial records

3

Cash Income Records Ledger

1988-1993

2

03 Financial records

24

Correspondence-Band Certificates

1962-1990

2

03 Financial records

22

Disbursement Ledger

1969-1976

2

03 Financial records

6

Disbursement Ledger

1976-1994

2

03 Financial records

16

Fed. Per Capita Dues Report

1972

2

03 Financial records

14

Fed. Per Capita Dues Report

1973

2

03 Financial records

10

Fed. Per Capita Dues Report

1974-1993

2

03 Financial records

20

Local Report Form-Fed. Initiation Fee

1970

2

03 Financial records

18

Local Report Form-Fed. Initiation Fee

1971

2

03 Financial records

12

Report on Examination

1973-1974

2

03 Financial records

1

Tax Date & Information

1982-1993

3

03 Financial records

8

Tax Date and Returns

1985-1993

3

03 Financial records

4

Treasurers Monthly Report (Form E)

1985-1994

2

03 Financial records

5

USPS Mail Receipts

1978-1993

2

03 Financial records

21

Year End Report

1969-1970

2

03 Financial records

19

Year End Report

1970-1971

2

03 Financial records

17

Year End Report

1971-1972

2

03 Financial records

15

Year End Report

1972-1973

2

03 Financial records

13

Year End Report

1973-1974


Series 4. ELECTION AND UNION INFORMATION, 1974-1993. 0.5 ft. (18 folders). Box 3 (110-01-03-04).

Included in this series is the AFL-CIO Kansas Resume by the Kansas State Federation of Labor. The book covers Kansas history, religion, & employment and includes a union chapter index. The bulk of this series contains sealed election ballots dated 1974 and 1988-1993. In conformity with Union retention schedules, all other ballots are destroyed after 1 year.

Information about conducting union elections is in reverse chronological order. The workbooks are arranged by subject.

2006-170.01
110-01-03-04
Box 3 of 6

Series 5. MEMBERS’ RECORDS, 1934-1966. 2 ft (20 items). Boxes 4-6

The secretary-treasurer maintained Ledger(s) of Receipts for Dues, Correspondence, Contract Information, and Performance/Venue Records. The Receipts for Dues Ledgers (6) are dated 1972-1991; the carbon receipts within are chronologically reversed.

Items in Correspondence and Contract Information are arranged chronologically. Entries in the Membership Ledgers, Contact Information Cards, and Venue/Performer Indexes are arranged alphabetically by name.

Subseries 1. Membership Ledgers, 1934-1966. 1 ft. (3 v.) Box 5. ACCESS RESTRICTED .

The Ledgers record each member’s contact information, instrument(s) played, and Association status (dues paid, violation fees, suspensions, reinstatements, and death benefits paid). Some entries contain Social Security numbers; access to Social Security numbers of living individuals is prohibited by federal law (42 U.S.C. 408 (a) (8)).

Volumes arranged chronologically.

Subseries 2. AFM: Welcome to New Members Slide Presentation Script, 1978. 1 item. Box 6.

A presentation giving basic background information about the AFM, what is expected of new members, and how being a member of the Association will benefit their musical career.

2006-170.01
110-01-03-05
Box 4 of 6

Box #
Series #
Name
Folder #
Name/Title
Dates

4

05 Members’ Records

1

Contracts: Gilbert Anderson

1992-1994

4

05 Members’ Records

2

Performers: Venues Played

n.d.

4

05 Members’ Records

3

Misc. Venue Announcements

n.d.

4

05 Members’ Records

4

Venues: Performers Played

n.d.

4

05 Members’ Records

5

Membership Dues Reports

1979-1992

4

05 Members’ Records

6

Correspondence: Traveling Membership Dues

1975-1977

4

05 Members’ Records

7

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1991-1993

4

05 Members’ Records

8

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1990-1991

4

05 Members’ Records

9

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1988-1990

4

05 Members’ Records

10

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1987-1988

4

05 Members’ Records

11

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1982-1983

4

05 Members’ Records

12

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1978-1980

4

05 Members’ Records

13

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1976-1978

4

05 Members’ Records

14

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1974-1975

4

05 Members’ Records

15

Member Dues Receipt Ledger

1972-1974

110-01-03-02
Box 5 of 6
(Secure storage)

Box #
Series #
Name
Item #
Name/Title
Dates

5

05 Members’ Records

1

Members’ Ledger

1942-1966

5

05 Members’ Records

2

Members’ Ledger

1940-1966

5

05 Members’ Records

3

Members’ Ledger

1934-1960

2006-170.01
110-01-03-07
Box 6 of 6
(Oversize)

Box #
Series #
Name
Item #
Name/Title
Date

6

02 Administration

1

MPTF: Orientation Script & Slide

n.d.

6

04 Election & Union Information

11

Cassette: Message from AFM President

1988

6

05 Members’ Records

2

AFM Welcome Members Script & Slide

1978

6

05 Members’ Records

3

Metal Rolodex: Member Contact Cards

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

4

Box: Member Contact Cards

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

5

Carousel Slides

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

6

Rectangular container of slides

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

7

Small container of slides

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

8

Small container of sliders

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

9

Sealed Phone Butler: Prerecorded Cassette

n.d.

6

05 Members’ Records

10

4 Reel-to-Reels

n.d.

Related Records

Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Local No. 2 (Osawatomie, Kans.) records: Ms. Collection 785

Howard Brown papers, 1890 - 1986: Ms. Collection 784; finding aid available at the Kansas Historical Society (KHS) and on its website, http://www.kshs.org.

Civic Symphony Society of Topeka minutes of meetings, 1952 - 1966: Ms. Collection 646, ser. H, file 6 (box 8)

Henry Clair Corbett papers: Ms. Collection 116

Jackson’s Old Dispatch Band and 23rd Regimental Band lists of members, 1889 - 1941: H. Perry miscellaneous collection

Lawrence Musical Association constitution: Ms. Collection 611

National Association of Letter Carriers, Air Capital Branch, No. 201 (Wichita, Kans.) records, 1891 - [ca. 2003]: Microfilm MF 6290 - MF 6293, available through interlibrary loan; finding aid available at KHS and on its website, http://www.kshs.org.

John W. Ripley papers: History of Transportation in Topeka and Shawnee County: Ms. Collection 72, Ser. 3 (Box 2); finding aid available at KSHS.

Separated Material

Minutes, 1896 - 1993 (Ser. 1) ; Notice to members (Local 36 - 665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] (Ser. 2, Subseries 4): borrowed from Manhattan Musicians’ Association and microfilmed (rolls MF 7190 - MF 7191).

Bibliography

American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada, Local 36 - 665 (Topeka, Kans.), Records, 1896 - 1993: Ms. collection 798, State Archives & Library, Kansas Historical Society, Topeka.

Index Terms

Persons

Anderson, Gilbert W., 1930-1998. (co-creator)

Corporate Names

American Federation of Musicians. Local 36 (Topeka, Kan.) (co-creator, subject)

American Federation of Musicians. Local 36-665 (Topeka, Kan.) (co-creator, subject)

Topeka Musical Association. (co-creator, subject)

Geographic Names

Kansas.

Topeka (Kan.)

Topeka Region (Kan.)

Subjects

Labor union meetings-Kansas-Topeka-Archives.

Labor union welfare funds-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Labor unions-Kansas-Topeka.

Music-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Music-Performance-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Musicians-Labor unions-Kansas-Topeka.

Popular music-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Survivors’ benefits-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Wages-Kansas-Topeka.

Document Types

Agendas (Administrative records). ( Art and Architecture Thesaurus )

Circular letters-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Corporate minutes-Kansas-Topeka.

Financial statements-Kansas-Topeka.

Occupations

Musicians-Kansas-Topeka Region.

Additional Information for Researchers

Restrictions on Access

Membership ledgers, ca. 1934-1966 (Ser. 5, Subseries 1): access available only after Social Security numbers of living individuals have been redacted.

Restrictions on Use

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17, U.S. Code). The user is cautioned that the publication of the contents of this collection may be construed as constituting a violation of literary property rights. These rights derive from the principle of common law, affirmed in the copyright law of 1976 as amended, that the writer of an unpublished letter or other manuscript has the sole right to publish the contents thereof unless he or she affirmatively parts with that right; the right descends to his or her legal heirs regardless of the ownership of the physical manuscript itself. It is the responsibility of a user or his or her publisher to secure the permission of the owner of literary property rights in unpublished writing.

Copyright to the donated textual records was given by the Manhattan Musicians’ Association as successor to the American Federation of Musicians, Local 36 - 665 (Topeka Musical Association), to the Kansas State Historical Society upon donation; copyright to the loaned Minutes, 1896 - 1993 (Series 1), and Notice to members (Local 36 - 665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] (Series 2, Subseries 4), was not given to the Society.

Requests for copies in excess of the copyright law’s standard of “fair use” or other permission should be directed to: Manhattan Musicians’ Association, 3135 Ella Lane, Manhattan, Kansas 66502-1761.

Custodial History

Some records kept by Gilbert W. Anderson, long - time member and officer.

Preferred Citation

Note: [citation to document, folder, volume, subseries and / or series], American Federation of Musicians of the United States and Canada, Local 36 - 665 (Topeka, Kans.), Records, 1896 - 1993, Ms. Collection 798, State Archives & Library, Kansas Historical Society, Topeka [with microfilm roll number if appropriate].

Acquisition Information

Minutes, 1896-1993 (Ser. 1) ; Notice to members (Local 36 - 665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] (Ser. 2, Subseries 4): loan, Manhattan Musicians’ Association (American Federation of Musicians [AFM], Local 169), as successor to AFM Local 36-665, formerly Topeka Musical Association, through Mary Lou Anderson, 2006; accession no. 2006-170.02. Remainder of collection: gift, Manhattan Musicians’ Association (AFM, Local 169), as successor to AFM Local 36 - 665, formerly Topeka Musical Association, through Mary Lou Anderson, 2006; accession no. 2006-170.01.

Processing Information

Preliminary arrangement by Mary Lou Anderson. The loaned Minutes, 1896 - 1993 (Ser. 1), and “Notice to Members (Local 36 - 665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980]” (Ser. 2, Subseries 4) , were prepared for microfilming by Robert L. Knecht, 2006. The donated textual records were arranged and described by Sheryl Baber Evans, intern, 2007.

Accruals

It is possible that additional records will be donated or loaned in the future, but no such accretions are anticipated at this time.

Location of Originals

Original Minutes, 1896-1993 (Ser. 1) ; Notice to members (Local 36-665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] (Ser. 2, Subseries 4): owned by the lender.

Notes

Original Minutes, 1896-1993 (Ser. 1) ; Notice to members (Local 36-665 Death Benefit Fund), [between 1978 and 1980] (Ser. 2, Subseries 4): Microfilm. Topeka, Kan. : Kansas State Historical Society, 2006; rolls MF 7190-MF 7191, lab no. 57427-57428; available for research, interlibrary loan, or purchase.

Finding Aid Prepared by Sheryl Baber Evans, intern, and Robert L. Knecht
Kansas Historical Society
Topeka, Kansas 2007

Contact Information:
Reference Section
State Archives & Library, Kansas Historical Society
6425 SW 6 th Avenue
Topeka KS 66615-1099
Voice: 785-272-8681, ext. 116
Fax: 785-272-8682
TDD: 785-272-8683
E-mail: reference@kshs.org
Website: http://www.kshs.org
© Kansas State Historical Society 2007