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Carry Amelia Nation Papers, 1870-1919

Carrie NationManuscript Collection No. 744

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Introduction

Abstract

Prohibition, women’s-rights activist. Of the central United States; Texas; Medicine Lodge, Kan.

Diary and scrapbook; letters written, particularly to her niece Callie Moore; letters received from admirers, especially after her crusade in Great Britain, Dec. 1908 – Mar. 1909; memorabilia; poems; and information about her activities in Kansas. Entries in her diary reveal her feelings and fears and express her faith. The letters are primarily to family members as well as public officials and supporters; they demand justice, tell of her travels, and discuss family members and concerns. Also included are letters received by Callie Moore from others and correspondence of other family members. Correspondents include the Blue Ribbon Gospel Temperance Union, Harriet W. Brand of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, Edward Andrew Braniff, A. M. Dickinson, Kansas Attorney General A. A. Godard, Albert Kohler of the French magazine La Vie heureuse, the Leicester & District Temperance Union, Nyle Miller of the Kansas State Historical Society, and Kansas Governor W. E. Stanley.

Dates

1870-1961 (bulk 1872-1909)

Quantity

2 boxes (0.6 ft.)

Creator

Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846-1911.

Title

Carry Amelia Nation papers

Identification

Ms. collection no. 744 (MC 744).

Language

English.

Notes

This finding aid describes materials held by the Kansas Historical Society. Materials may be used in the State Archives and Library during regular research hours. Support for telephone, mail, and online reference and research is limited.

In a continuing effort to improve the completeness and accuracy of finding aids, revisions are made as more or new information becomes available. Consequently finding aids in paper format, on microfilm, and on the society’s web site may differ slightly.

Descriptions are often based on a preliminary inspection of the material. As such, they may contain misspellings or other inaccuracies based on folder headings and other sources within the materials. As the collections are arranged and as time permits, these finding aids are improved and corrected. If you spot an error, please feel free to report it to the reference staff or an archivist.

Repository

Kansas Historical Society (Topeka)

Biography

Carry Amelia Nation

The following chronology was compiled by Ty Phagan, volunteer:

1846 November 25

Carrie Amelia Moore was born in Garrard County, Kentucky, on a farm on “Dick’s creek,” now the Dix River.

ca. 1852

Carrie’s family moved to Boyle County, Kentucky, about two miles north of Danville.

 

Note: Some sources indicate that the family moved to Mercer County, but Herbert Asbury’s biography (Carry Nation, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1929) confirms they moved to Boyle County, two miles north of Danville, a few miles south of the Mercer County line. Carry Nation’s autobiography (The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, Revised ed., Topeka: F. M. Steves & Sons, 1909) does not indicate a county. The county line has not changed since 1850; cf. William Thorndale and William Dollarhide (Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790-1920, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1987, 128).

1854

The family moved to Woodford County, Kentucky, between Midway and Versailles.

1854

Carrie attended school at the Baconian Institute, a girl’s boarding school affiliated with the Midway Christian Church, in Midway.

ca. 1857

Carrie and her family moved to High Grove Farm in Cass County, Missouri. Carrie caught a cold during travel that turned into a prolonged illness.

ca. 1859

Carrie was a student at Mrs. Tillery’s boarding school in nearby Independence, Missouri, but illness prevented her from attending much of the time.

1861

The Civil War began. Carrie traveled on a wagon train with her family to Grayson County, Texas. She regained her health after arrival.

1862

Carrie and her family returned to Cass County. Shortly after arriving in Cass County, Carrie went to live with her aunt in Kansas City due to the demands of the Union Army on residents of Cass and neighboring counties.

ca. 1863

Carrie attended a boarding school in Liberty, Missouri. As before, her schooling was intermittent because of illness.

1865

The Civil War ended. Carrie returned to Cass County.

1867 November 1

Carrie married Charles Gloyd, a doctor, and moved with him to Holden, Missouri. Charles began drinking heavily, and soon Carrie left him, returning to her family’s home.

1868 September 27

Charilen, Carrie’s daughter, was born.

1870

Charles died. Carrie felt guilty and went to live with his mother in Holden. She then attended Warrensburg State Normal School, now Central Missouri State University, and received a certificate to teach. She used this to teach at the Holden school for four years in primary education.

1874 December 30

Carrie married David Nation.

1876

Carrie and her new family moved to Texas, living along the San Bernard River in Brazoria County and farming 1700 acres of cotton. Shortly after this she moved to Columbia, Texas, in order to begin in the hotel business.

1881 February 3

They moved to Richmond, Texas, to operate a hotel there.

1890

Carrie and David left their family with her first mother-in-law in Richmond, Texas, and moved to Medicine Lodge, Kansas.

1896

Carrie and David moved to the “Cheyenne country” of Oklahoma Territory and staked a claim near Seiling.

1898 November

Callie Moore, a niece, moved in with them at the age of 13.

1899 October 17

They sold their claim and moved back to Medicine Lodge.

1900 February 28

Carrie noted in her diary that she was studying osteopathy and was the co-president of the Barber County [Kansas] Women’s Christian Temperance Union (W.C.T.U.).

1900 September 16

Carrie and the W.C.T.U. served warrants to George Southworth’s drugstore for selling beer and whiskey. She then proceeded to legally have all the sellers of alcohol closed down in Medicine Lodge. Shortly after, she went on her first real smashing in Kiowa, Kansas, using bricks to damage saloons. After being detained by the mayor she was released.

1900 December 27

Carrie smashed saloons in Wichita, Kansas, including the Hotel Carey, and was then detained in jail until 12 January 1901.

1901 January 21

Carrie first wielded a hatchet, for which she became well known. She then attacked James Burne’s and John Hareg’s saloons.

1901 January 26

Carrie Nation arrived in Topeka, Kansas. Shortly afterward, she decided to make the city her home.

1901 January 28

Carrie denounced Kansas Governor William Stanley for failing to enforce prohibition.

1901 February 8

Carrie lectured at the Academy of Music in Kansas City on prohibition.

1901 February 28

Carrie vowed to smash every saloon in Kansas City or die in the attempt.

1901 March 7

Carrie helped publish The Smasher’s Mail.

1901 November 27

Carrie and David were divorced.

1901 December 5

Due to lack of time to publish the paper, Carrie discontinued The Smasher’s Mail. Shortly after, her smashing career reached its peak at the Senate Saloon in Topeka.

1902

Carrie began to write her autobiography.

1902 January

Carrie lectured at the University of Missouri in Columbia.

1903

Carrie sold her home in Medicine Lodge and used the money to make a down payment on a home in Kansas City, Kansas, which was to be used for the wives of drunkards.

1903 August 13

Carrie’s name was officially changed to Carry.

 

Note: Several sources indicated that her father wrote Carry in the family Bible at her birth, but that Carrie had been used as her name since childhood.

1903 October 3

David Nation died.

1903 November 19

Carry went to the White House to speak with President Theodore Roosevelt but was denied an audience.

1904 September 16

Carry’s autobiography was first published.

1906

Carry moved to Oklahoma Territory to campaign for its admittance as a “dry” State. She began publishing another newspaper, The Hatchet, in Guthrie.

1907

Carry spent the year in Washington, D.C.

1908 December – 1909 March

Carry went on a crusade to Ireland, Scotland, and England accompanied by Callie Moore.

1909

Carry settled in northern Arkansas, eventually buying a home — “Hatchet Hall” — in Eureka Springs. Callie Moore assisted as its caretaker.

1911 January 13

Carry collapsed while speaking in Eureka Springs. Her final public statement was “I have done what I could.” She returned to her physician in Kansas City for treatment.

1911 June 9

Carry died at Evergreen Hospital, Leavenworth, Kansas, after being ill for five months.

Callie Bell (Moore) Blum

Carrie Bell (or Belle) Moore was born 24 May 1886, in Pomona, Kansas, the daughter of Campbell Moore, Carry Nation’s brother, and Maria Dillon Robinson Moore. She had four brothers and two sisters: John Burns; George William; Jacob (Jake) Robinson (“J. R.”); Joseph Milton; Mary Elizabeth, who died as a child shortly after Callie’s birth; and May, who died in infancy before Callie was born. It appears the family moved to Missouri before she was two years old. Although her given name was Carrie, she changed it to Callie while in grade school. During much of her teenage years, she lived with David and Carry Nation, but she was residing with her parents in Kansas City, Kansas, when she was eighteen years old in 1905. She attended William Woods College (now William Woods University) in Fulton, Missouri.

Carry Nation viewed her as a potential assistant and successor if she could be freed from family responsibilities. Aside from accompanying Carry to the British Isles in late 1908 and early 1909 and being present at some smaller engagements, however, Callie never pursued her aunt’s cause.

Toward the end of Carry’s life, Callie lived with her at Hatchet Hall in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, and served as an overseer handling maintenance and other responsibilities. After Carry’s death in 1911 and through the final probation of her will in 1914, Callie served as the executor of Carry’s estate and liaison between her family and the court system.

Upon her return to Kansas City, Callie began working as a bookkeeper, clerk, and later office manager in her brother George’s transfer - and - storage business in Kansas City, Kansas; she lived there with her mother and some of her brothers. She may have briefly moved out of the family home and worked in the millinery business around 1912, but returned to both her mother’s house and George’s company. She continued working for her brother until about 1933 when she quit to become a nurse.

She worked as a practical nurse at Bethany Hospital in Kansas City, and was hired by George W. Blum and other members of his family to take care of his wife, Emma. Following Emma’s death, the family released her, but later hired her again to nurse George. She and George Blum married in October 1940. She was a member of Central Christian Church, the Y.W.C.A., and the Eastern Star. George Blum died in 1947. At the end of her life, Callie lived in a nursing home in Edwardsville, Kansas. She died 20 January 1977 in Kansas City and is buried in Pleasant Hill, Missouri.

Scope and Content

This collection provides a significant amount of documentary material on Carry Amelia Nation, a notable figure in the field of women’s rights as well as prohibition. Information in this collection provides details of her life and may effect a change in the popular perception of her as a caricatured, hatchet-wielding fanatic.

As might be expected, the most personal comments are those she made in her Diary and Scrapbook, 1870 – 1900, series 1. Although difficult to read because of the volume’s poor condition, the lengthy entries she made in her journal expressed her innermost feelings: concern for her family, fear for her marriage to David Nation, and worry for her daughter’s health. Overriding all, though, was a simple trust in God who would bestow His approval on her life and actions, though not necessarily relieve her burdens. The book also contains information on the family’s economic life with lists of purchases and farm commodities sold, descriptions of their work to establish hotels in Texas, and several moves for health or economic reasons.

If the Diary and Scrapbook represented her inner soul, the letters she wrote represented her outward actions. The fragile, worried woman in the diary expressed herself as a powerhouse of energy on behalf of the causes she espoused. She had no hesitancy about ordering the governor of Kansas and local officials to release her from confinement. The letters in the collection that she wrote consistently expressed a theme of redemption, be it redemption from drink, from social evils, or even from fashionable clothing. She constantly admonished the recipients, either explicitly or implicitly, to look higher and to do more for Right.

Letters to Callie Moore (series 3, subseries 3), form the bulk of those written by Carry Nation in the collection; they are primarily are concerned with family matters and her travels on behalf of prohibition. Several of the letters referred to the hard feelings between Carry and her brother Campbell, Callie’s father, but nevertheless expressed Carry’s concern for him. Though never a wealthy woman, Carry’s generosity showed throughout the letters, which included small gifts to children, offers to assist family in need, and instructions to further her work to provide Christmas presents to prisoners. Concern for the health of her daughter, Charlien, was a constant theme. As might be expected, the letters were written from a variety of places but mostly from Arkansas and other Southern States; in her correspondence, Carry commented on her travels on behalf of prohibition. In a 1906 letter (series 3, subseries 4, folder 2-3-48), she urged her sister-in-law, “Dellie” (Maria Dillon Moore) — Callie’s mother — to flee what may have been an abusive situation. Her affection for Callie, who at one time she thought would be her successor, was obvious. Several letters talked about Callie taking on the role of her helper and accompanying her on her crusades; Callie did go with her to the British Isles in 1908 and 1909. Carry’s home for the wives of alcoholics in Kansas City, Kansas, was mentioned a number of times; in one letter she bemoaned that the estate of her deceased sister wasn’t bequeathed to the Home. Her later letters increasingly talked of physical frailties, especially pain in her arms that made writing difficult.

In contrast to her contemporary image in popular culture, it is obvious from the letters, poems, and other items sent to her (series 3, subseries 1), that she was beloved by many during her lifetime. Much of the correspondence that Callie Moore preserved in her trunk was from supporters in England and Scotland, where the two of them visited in late 1908 and early 1909. At a time when Carry was regularly incarcerated for her actions, a young Kansas City Star reporter-turned-student named Edward Braniff became entranced with her and concerned for her safety, though he did not support her cause; his letters expressed that concern and his interest in her as a person.

Since much of this collection consists of materials preserved by Callie Moore, it is to be expected that letters written to her (series 3, subseries 3) account for most of the correspondence. While many of the letters she preserved were from Carry Nation, many other family members, friends, and acquaintances wrote her as well. A number of letters were from cousins visiting other family during summers and telling Callie about their experiences. There were several letters and invitations from friends she met while attending William Woods College, now William Woods University, which at the time was an all - women’s college in Fulton, Missouri.

There is relatively little third-party description of Carry Nation in the collection. The letters of Callie Moore and other family members do not offer any family commentary on her or her actions. The letters, articles and other items about Carry Amelia Nation, 1901 – 1961 (series 2, subseries 2) are a compilation of descriptions and vignettes of her collected by the Kansas State Historical Society from newspaper accounts and reminiscences.

There are a few other letters of interest. Several letters are from Callie Moore’s brother, J. R. Moore, who was a sailor in World War I. His letters (series 3, subseries 3 and 4) provide a little information about his duties at sea and trips to France and Washington, D.C., while on leave.

The Kansas Historical Society Library has a large number of references to published materials written by and about Carry Nation. Consult the catalogs and other finding aids for additional information. Researchers may also want to consult bibliographies and footnotes in published biographies of Carry Nation for additional sources.

Contents List

The collection (MC 744) is organized by series to reflect its sources.

Series
Sources

1

Papers given by the Carry Nation Memorial Home, Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1990, accession no. 1990MS102.

2

Papers originally in the Kansas State Historical Society’s Carry Nation miscellaneous collection. Two subseries are defined.

3

Papers given by Jerald and Dianne Kelly in 1999, accession no. 1999-283.01. These materials were received in conjunction with receipt of other photographs, books, articles of clothing, and personal items belonging to Carry Nation. Eight subseries are defined. The non-manuscript materials (photographs, books, clothing, etc.) included in the 1999 accession are present in the Kansas Historical Society’s library, photograph collections, or in the Kansas Museum of History collections, respectively, and are not described in this finding aid.

Series Descriptions

The collection (MC 744) is organized by series to reflect the unique sources of the collection’s materials. Series 2 and 3 contain subseries, organized by type of material. Each series, or subordinate subseries, may contain multiple folders. Individual folders may contain multiple items.

Folders are numbered sequentially beginning at 1 as the first folder of each new series (regardless of the number of subseries present). Each folder is uniquely labeled with the collection number in parentheses, and an articulated number composed of the number of the manuscript box in which it is located, its associated series, and its sequential folder ID number within the series.

For example, the Carry Amelia Nation Papers collection consists of two boxes that contain three series. The 4th folder of series 2 (Papers originally in the Kansas Historical…) of this collection is in box 1, and is requested by specifying (744) 1-2-4.

 

Series
Sources
Subseries
Contents
1 Papers given by the Carry Nation Memorial Home, Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1990, accession no. 1990MS102.  
Diary (1872 – 1900) and scrapbook (1870 – 1900)
2 Papers originally in the Kansas Historical Society’s Carry Nation miscellaneous collection. Received from many sources over a period of many years (as noted for individual items within this series). 1
Letters sent [between 1900 Dec. 26 and 1901 Jan. 12] – 1906.
    2
Letters, articles, and other items about Carry Amelia Nation, 1901 – 1961.
3 Papers given by Jerald and Dianne Kelly in 1999, accession no. 1999-283.01. These materials were included in conjunction with receipt of photographs, books, articles of clothing, and personal items belonging to Carry Nation that are now a part of the KHS library, photograph, and museum collections described elsewhere. 1
Letters and poetry received, 1901 – 1909.
    2
Memorabilia, Dec. 1908 – Mar. 1909.
    3
Callie Moore, Papers, 1905 – 1919.
    4
M. D. Moore, Letters received, 1906 – 1918.
    5
A. W. Little, Note, 1906 Nov. 1.
    6
B. E. Dickey, Letter [not after 1907 Feb. 25]
    7
Nation, Carry A.
     
Pennsylvania Railroad Company ticket coupon book, 1908 May 27.
    8
[Unknown to Callie Moore], Postcard, leather, 1906 Nov. 16.

Folder List

All folders contain original materials unless otherwise noted on the folder label. To request folder materials, identify the collection folder’s label information (collection number, box, series, folder), as listed in the left column of the following series list:

(744) 1 - 2 - 4 (collection#) box# - series# - folder#

 

 

 

 

SERIES 1

 

 

 

 

 

PAPERS GIVEN BY THE CARRY NATION MEMORIAL HOME (MEDICINE LODGE, KANS.)

 

MC 744

 
 
 

Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911.

1870-1900

 

 
 
 

Diary (1872 – 1900) and scrapbook

 

 

 
 
 

1 in. (p.201 – 317) placed into 8 folders: photocopies

 

 

 
 
 

Contains poetry written by Carrie Nation, expense registers showing items purchased & prices, a list of farm products sold with prices, and a diary (1872 – 1900). The diary entries (p.206 – 90) tell of her parents, husband, & daughter and family members & matters; express her love for David Nation & later depression when the marriage falters; summarize her teaching, religious, & other activities; describe their life, friends, hotel - keeping, & circumstances in Texas and other events she deemed important, including visits to Galveston, Tex., for medical treatment for her daughter; discuss Prohibition endeavors; tell of her moves to Medicine Lodge, Kan., & the “Cheyenne country” (Oklahoma Territory); express her feelings; and proclaim her faith & trust in God. Entries are sporadic but lengthy. At the end of the volume are an unidentified floor plan and a printed map of Palestine.

 

 

 
 
 

The volume is badly damaged and extremely difficult to read; pages 1 – 200 are missing. Other documents written by Carry Nation are in series 2 and 3, below.

 

 

 
 
 

This series consists of 8 folders of original materials, followed by 8 folders of photocopies and 8 folders of photographic negative copies of these original materials.

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

1

 
Front inserts, unnumbered front pages, two poems

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

2

 
Pages 201-240.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

3

 
Pages 241-260.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

4

 
Pages 261-278.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

5

 
Pages 283-300.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

6

 
Pages 301-319.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

7

 
Map of Palestine removed from inside back cover.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

8

 
Floor plan removed from back last sheet/end sheet.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

9

 
Photocopies: Front inserts, unnumbered front pages, two poems

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

10

 
Photocopies: Pages 201-240.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

11

 
Photocopies: Pages 241-260.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

12

 
Photocopies: Pages 261-278.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

13

 
Photocopies: Pages 283-300.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

14

 
Photocopies: Pages 301-319.

 

 

 
 
 
 

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

15

 
Photocopies: Map of Palestine removed from inside back cover.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

16

 
Photocopies: Floor plan removed from back last sheet/end sheet.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

17

 
Negatives: Front inserts, unnumbered front pages, two poems

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

18

 
Negatives: Pages 201-240.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

19

 
Negatives: Pages 241-260.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

20

 
Negatives: Pages 261-278.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

21

 
Negatives: Pages 283-300.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

22

 
Negatives: Pages 301-319.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1

1

23

 
Negatives: Map of Palestine removed from inside back cover.

 

Box

Ser.

Fol.

 

 

 

1
1
24
 
Negatives: Floor plan removed from back last sheet/end sheet.
 
           
       
SERIES 2
 
       
PAPERS FROM THE CARRY NATION MISCELLANEOUS COLLECTION, KANSAS HISTORICAL SOCIETY (TOPEKA)
 
MC (744)      
Series 2 materials are divided between letters written by Carry Amelia Nation (subseries 1), and letters, articles, and other items written about her (subseries 2).
 
       
SERIES 2 – SUBSERIES 1
 
MC (744)       Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. [between 1900 Dec. 26 and 1901 Jan. 12] –
        Letters sent 1906
        4 items in 4 folders  
        Letters, 2 of them from jails, written to a family member, a supporter, and public officials. The letters state her position and describe her situation, often demanding that officials visit her or order her release. The 1906 letter is longer and more familial in nature; it describes and requests information about family members and supporters.  
           
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. [between 1900 Dec. 26 and 1901 Jan. 12]
1 2 1   Letter : ALS, Wichita, Kan., to Kansas Governor W. E. Stanley, Wichita, Kan.  
        1p. + envelope  
        Asks Governor Stanley to come see her, as she is co - president of the Barber County (Kan.) Woman’s Christian Temperance Union and detained unlawfully; if he cannot visit her, she requests that he summon her to see him. On the back is a notation stating she wants to leave on the 5:00 train. Written from the Wichita, Kan., city jail.  
        Gift: Harriet Stanley, 1969.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1901 Feb. 5
1 2 2   Letter : ALS, Topeka, Kan., to [David Nation, s.l.]  
        1 p. : fragment  
        The beginning of a letter to “my dear husband” from the jail in the Topeka, Kan., police station. She says she is fine and tells him not to worry, she states that Mr. Rankin has “made some [court?] dates,” but she is destined to stay in jail. An annotation on the letter by Mrs. Sharpe, police matron, says it remained unfinished because Carrie was taken to court.  
        Gift: Nellie E. Thorpe, 1960.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1901 Mar. 4
1 2 3   Note : holograph, Topeka, Kan., to [Kansas Attorney - general] A. A. Godard, Topeka, Kan.  
        postal card  
        [Attorney Alfred L.] Redden isn’t doing anything, and she wants Godard to see her; she has much evidence against the Moeser brothers. Written from the Topeka, Kan., jail.  
        Gift: D. V. Godard, 1956.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 June 2
1 2 4   Letter : ALS, Hot Springs, Ark., to “Sister [Comora Scott?] Martin,” [Medicine Lodge, Kan.?]  
        [2] leaves  
        Charlien is here, and though she has good health, her mind is impaired. Since writing last, Carry lost her sister Eddie; she died in Kansas City after breast-cancer surgery. Carry is sending Sister Martin The Hatchet. Carry asks if Alice has sold any more books. Carry is hoping to publish an improved edition next year. She travels too much and can’t find out about events in Medicine Lodge, Kan., from the Index; she asks for news and information about supporters. She is sending dimes to all but the youngest children.  
        Given by Comora Scott Martin to the Woman’s Kansas Day Club prior to their donation of it to the Kansas Historical Society (Topeka).  
        Gift: Woman’s Kansas Day Club, 1948.  
MC (744)      
SERIES 2 – SUBSERIES 2
 
        Letters, articles, and other items about Carry Amelia Nation  
Box Ser. Fol.   11 items 1901 – 1961
1 2 5   Transcripts (typewritten) of 5 articles from Topeka, Kan., by A. M. Dickinson in the Saturday Globe (Utica, N.Y.), Mar. 9 – Apr. 2, 1901, on Carrie Nation & her influence; anti - saloon raids in Kansas; saloons, druggists selling liquor, & bootleggers; why Prohibition - law convictions are not obtained; and expected results of Mrs. Nation’s crusade. Also includes a statement, July 28, 1905, about the unexplained breaking of the glass over a Carry Nation portrait; reminiscences of Daisy Johntz, [1951] Jan. 19, and Estelle Arthur Owens, 1961 Jan. 23, describing Carry Nation’s stay with Mrs. Johntz’s family & saloon - smashing in Enterprise, Kan., and her crusades in other towns; and contextual information by the donor, Oct. 22, 1969, about Carrie Nation’s letter to Kansas Governor W. E. Stanley [between 1900 Dec. 26 and 1901 Jan. 12] — box, series 2, folder 1, above — with 2 memos from Joe Gambone, Manuscripts Division, to Nyle Miller, secretary, Kansas State Historical Society (Topeka), containing additional information from The Wichita Daily Eagle on Mrs. Nation’s arrest & detention.  
        Originals and photographs (negative) of newspaper articles are stored in separate folders, for security reasons.  
        Arranged chronologically.  
        Various sources.  
           
       
SERIES 3
 
       
PAPERS GIVEN BY JERALD & DIANNE KELLY
 
MC (744)       Series 3 contains eight subseries:  
        1 Letters and poetry received, 1901 – 1909.  
        2 Memorabilia, Dec. 1908 – Mar. 1909.  
        3 Callie Moore, Papers, 1905 – 1919.  
        4 M. D. Moore, Letters received, 1906 – 1918.  
        5 A. W. Little, Note, 1906 Nov. 1.  
        6 B. E. Dickey, Letter [not after 1907 Feb. 25].  
        7 Railroad ticket coupon book, 1908.  
        8 Postcard, 1906.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 1
 
MC (744)       Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1901 – 1909
        Letters and poetry received  
        18 items  
        Letters and poetry sent to Carry Nation, mostly supportive of her work. Some are from people and temperance organizations in Great Britain as a result of her appearances there. Included are 7 letters (folder 1-3-3), from Edward A. Braniff, a reporter for the Kansas City Star and later a student at Yale University (New Haven, Ct.); his letters ask about her life, tell of his studies, and discuss borrowing her diary & letters. Other letters request information, express support, and talk about speaking commitments.  
        Arranged alphabetically by sender, thereunder chronologically.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Bayne, Allan. Dec. 23, 1908
1 3 1   Where are the suffragites? : holograph poem, Renton [England?] to Carry A. Nation [s.l.]  
        postcard  
        Includes commentary on liquor’s effects.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Blue Ribbon Gospel Temperance Union.  
1 3 2   Letter : ALS, Croydon, England, R. E. Reep, to Mrs. Nation [s.l.].  
        1:00 PM  
        Confirming arrangements for her visit, if she doesn’t come it would set back their cause considerably, they are forming a Prohibition League.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Braniff, Edward Andrew. [1901] – 1902
1 3 3   Letters : to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        7 items  
        Reporter, student; of Kansas City, Mo.; New Haven, CT.  
        Braniff was a reporter for the Kansas City Star and later a student at Yale University (New Haven, Ct.). The letters are very personal and ask about her life, tell of his studies, and discuss borrowing her diary & letters. He expresses much personal sympathy for her, but disavows her cause. The texts of some of her letters to him are quoted in his article “How I Ran Out on Carry Nation” in Commonweal 47, no. 23 (19 Mar. 1948), 558–60.  
        Item descriptions:  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. [1901 Feb. 28]
        Letter : ALS, Kansas City, Mo., to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan., “Thursday night.”  
        [3] p. on 1 leaf : folded + envelope  
        He has published her communication, has her letters but wants her diary and story of her life, wants to know why she was banished from the Christian Church and other information.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. [1901] Mar. 21
        Letter : ALS [s.l.] to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        [5] p. on [2] leaves : folded  
        He is moved that she is coming to Kansas City to see him, feels she is the greatest person he has ever known, cares about her but not her cause, fears for her safety, requests that his letters not be made public.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. 1901 June 23
        Letter : ALS [s.l.] to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        [2] p. on 1 leaf : folded  
        He is returning her diary and letters, did not use them but hopes to do so after he finishes college.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. 1901 Aug. 12
        Letter : ALS [s.l.] to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        [3] p. on 1 leaf : folded  
        He is starting at Yale in September, declines her offer of money for school.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. 1902 Feb. 3
        Letter : ALS, New Haven, Ct., to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        1 p. + envelope  
        He is busy with studies, does not have time to read the book she suggested, is glad to hear that report of her accident was false.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. [1902] Mar. 5
        Letter : ALS, Kansas City, Mo., to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        [2] p. on l leaf : folded  
        He can’t do what she asked because of the press of his studies.  
        Braniff, Edward Andrew. 1902 June 4
        Letter : ALS, New Haven, Ct., to Mrs. Nation, Topeka, Kan.  
        4 leaves  
        He is sorry to learn she is in trouble, is tired of liquor agitation but resents her being in jail, pleased with his studies in forestry at Yale, plans to return in the fall, plans to spend the summer in forestry work in the West.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Carleton, Will. 1909 May 24
1 3 4   Letter : TLS, Brooklyn, N.Y., to Carry A. Nation, Manhattan, Kan.  
        1 p. + envelope  
        News accounts say she has quit temperance work and returned to farming, he hopes to hear from her soon.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Eldridge, Mrs. E. M. 1907 Dec. 23
1 3 5   Letter : ALS, Worcester, Mass., to Mrs. Nation [s.l.]  
        1:00 PM  
        Letter enclosing a donation. Annotated with acknowledgments by an unknown person.  
Box Ser. Fol.   La Vie heureuse. 1909 févr. 12
1 3 6   Letter : ALS, Paris, France, Albert Kohler, to Carrie Nation, London, England  
        2 p. on 1 leaf : folded + envelope  
        Soliciting autobiographical story or citations to published biographies from her.  
        In part, in French.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Leicestershire & District Temperance Union. 1909 Feb. 26
1 3 7   Letter : ALS, Leicester, England, G. Ernest Winterton, to Mrs. Nation [s.l.]  
        1:00 PM  
        Financial settlement of her speaking engagement in Leicester, England.  
Box Ser. Fol.   McLelland, James. [1909] Feb. 26
1 3 8   Mrs. Carrie Nation : holograph poem, Clydesbank [Scotland].  
        2 p. on 1 leaf : folded  
        Poem critical of Carry Nation.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Mrs. Nation[’]s reception in England : poem, Glasgow, Scotland, to Carry Nation, London, England. Jan. 23, 1909
1 3 9   postal card  
        Supportive poem copied from the Evening Times, Glasgow Scotland, by an unknown person and sent to her.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Whyte, R. D. Mar. 10, 1909
1 3 10   Carry A. Nation : holograph poem.  
        13 p.  
        Supportive poem.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Wilson, Nettie E. 1909 Feb. 22
1 3 11   Letter : ALS, Garden City, Kan., to Carrie A. Nation, Dundee, Scotland.  
        2 p. on l leaf : folded  
        Requests a date for a speaking engagement, regrets her treatment in London, will ensure it won’t happen in Garden City, Kan.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. Nov. 21 – 26, 1906
1 3 12   Receipt, Cover letter: typescripts, Washington, D.C., Harriet W. Brand, to Carrie Nation, Washington, D. C., The Hatchet.  
        2 items.  
        Receipt for payment on pledge and cover letter, both signed by the organization’s treasurer.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 2
 
MC (744)       Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 – [1917?]
        Memorabilia.  
        7 folders.  
        An itinerary of Carry Nation’s travels, notes on her speaking engagements, & printed announcements of her talks, and a list of reasons “Why I Went,” all from her trip to Great Britain; a supportive poem sent to her; poetry, some that she presumably wrote; and a list of names.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Itinerary of Carry Nation’s travels, Notes on speaking engagements, Printed announcements. Dec. 1908 –
1 3 13   5 documents. Mar. 1909
Box Ser. Fol.   Makinson, Joseph. [n.d.]
1 3 14   Carrie Moore - Campbell, Nee, Nation [sic] : holograph poem.  
        2 leaves.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. [n.d.]
1 3 15   Letting it alone. : poem / by C. N.  
        1 p. : typescript, fragment  
        Poem about a drinker, presumably written by Carry Nation. The name and address of W. R. MacAdams, Melrose, Mass., is annotated at the bottom. The page has been partially eaten by rodents; consequently the text is incomplete. Written on the verso of stationery from the Hotel Bonham, Clay Center, Kan.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. [not before March 1909]
1 3 16   Why I went.  
        1:00 PM  
        A list of reasons why she went to Great Britain, written on stationery from the New Barry Hotel, Cassville, Mo. It is possible that the list may be that of Callie Moore instead.  
Box Ser. Fol.   List of names. [s.l.] [n.d.]
1 3 17   1 p. : holograph  
        Five names, presumably a list of supporters written by Carry Nation.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Inspirational poem. [Belfast, Ireland?] [n.d.]
1 3 18   1 p. : holograph  
        A poem about trusting in God. “These lines were found on the back of a 1 £ note, recently passed into the Bank at Belfast in the ordinary course of business.”  
Box Ser. Fol.   Poetry and other items. 1908 – [1917?]
1 3 19   5 items  
        Two poems; a note presumably about a surprise party; an envelope postmarked Kansas City, Kan. addressed to “Mrs. Dr. Jones,” Kansas City, Kan.; and 2 printed items. These items may have belonged to Callie Moore, or to another family member rather than Carry Nation.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 3
 
MC (744)       Moore, Callie (Callie Bell), 1886 – 1977. 1905 – 1919
        Correspondence received.  
        32 items  
        Letters & postcards received by Callie Moore from her aunt, Carry Nation (Callie was the daughter of Carry’s brother Campbell) and letters & invitations from others. The correspondence from Carry Nation (folders 2-3-24 through 2-3-41), contains mostly observations and questions about family members, particularly Callie’s parents & Myrtle Moore, and matters, including Campbell Nation’s hostility toward her. Carry also talks of her travels and, to a lesser degree, her activities. Note: Letters from Carry Nation to others are in series 1 and 2.  
        Letters to Callie Moore from friends and other family members talk of their experiences — including visits with friends & relatives and a camping trip to Montgomery County, Mo. — and request news of other family & acquaintances. Letters from Callie’s brother, J. R. Moore, were written while he was in the Navy in World War I; one describes shore leave in Paris & other French cities and discusses buying & selling farms and postwar family plans; other letters from him are in series 3, subseries 4, below. Also included are wedding and graduation invitations, and bank deposit receipts.  
        Arranged alphabetically by sender, and therein chronologically.  
Box Ser. Fol.   [Grover?] 1908 July 12 – 13
2 3 20   Letter : ALS, Bluffton, Mo., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] leaves + envelope  
        Callie’s letter cheered him up. He is on a camping trip on the Loutre River in Montgomery County, Mo., and tells of their hunting & fishing successes. Newton Hockensmith is telling him to make dumplings from one of the caught squirrels. The author is the chief cook. He will be home the first of the following week.  
        [Grover?]. 1908 Sept. 14
        Letter : ALS, Fulton, Mo., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [4] leaves + envelope  
        He has not been feeling well since having teeth pulled 3 weeks ago; the pain was intense for 2 weeks, and he could sleep only because they were giving him morphine; he has been living on only milk and is sick of it. He will send her the pennant as soon as the store gets more; his was made into a pillow tag for his mother. An old friend from Kansas City stopped by while passing through; he is an electrician. It doesn’t seem as empty now that children are returning to school. Dr. Jones wanted him to fix an electric clock, but he couldn’t go there. It has been quiet since Callie was there. The morphine is making him dizzy, so he has to stop writing.  
Box Ser. Fol.   McNabb, Carrie Belle. 1908 June 12
2 3 21   Letter : ALS, Louisburg, Kan., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [4] p. on 1 leaf : folded + envelope  
        She tells Callie to be sure and come tomorrow for the party in Carrie’s honor; Carrie laments having nothing suitable to wear. She doesn’t know how long she will be there and under her grandmother’s control. “Old Sugar Meat” called last night. Carrie asks whom Callie said was giving a party upon Carrie’s return home and whether Callie has heard from Cousin Charlie. Carrie McNabb was Callie Moore’s cousin.  
        McNabb, Carrie Belle. 1908 [June? 18?]
        Letter : ALS, Louisburg, Kan., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [6] p. on 2 leaves  
        Things here are as Callie told her. Mary and she never got along well, but Mary has been very sweet to her. They want her to stay a week, but she wants to leave, as they boss her too much; nevertheless, she is enjoying herself. She hasn’t been with Cousin Nannie [probably Nannie B. (Carson) Moore, the wife of Charles Gloyd Moore, Carrie’s first cousin once removed] much. Asks Callie to send mail to May’s home. Carrie has been picking and eating many gooseberries. She asks Callie not to send her any more clothes. Callie and Carrie were cousins.  
        McNabb, Carrie Belle. 1908 June 24
        Letter : ALS, Cleveland, Mo., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] p. on 1 leaf : folded + envelope  
        She will be returning Wednesday and will tell Callie about her experiences when Carrie comes home. Carrie asks Callie to meet her on Carrie’s return. Carrie was Callie Moore’s cousin.  
        McNabb, Carrie Belle. 1908 Aug. 2
        Letter : ALS, Washington, D.C., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        4 leaves + envelope  
        She asks Callie to send her a photo. She asks about various family members and acquaintances. She asks if Callie and “Aunt Dilly” [Maria Dillon Moore] are experiencing hard times and invites them to live with her family. She discusses various family relationships. She asks if Callie is going to vacation at [Niagara?] Falls and suggests they stop by Washington, D.C. She likes Washington fine, but it isn’t as good as Kansas City; Washington would be more fun with fewer “old maids.” Written on Prohibition Federation of Oklahoma stationery.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Moore, J. R. (Jacob Robinson) [19]18 June 19
2 3 22   Letter : ALS [s.l.] to [M. D. and Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [4] leaves  
        From Callie’s brother and Maria Dillon’s son, a World War I sailor. Anything interesting he might write would be censored. He underlined truthful portions of the clipping he sent them, if the censor passed it. He and his friends enjoyed the clippings the family sent him. He is hoping to come home for Christmas. He misses his mother’s cooking. When “the boy” is old enough, let J. R. know so he can send a sailor uniform. He sends greetings to others. He asks the recipients to tell Aunt Mag that he thinks of them often. Other letters from J. R. Moore to his mother are in series 3, subseries 4, below.  
        Moore J. R. (Jacob Robinson) [19]19 Jan. 29
        Letter : ALS [s.l.] to [Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [3] leaves  
        He has just returned from a 5-day leave in Paris, France, which he described as a “wonderful city.” He has been to Rheims and saw the front lines. He is feeling fine but gaining weight. He didn’t have time in Paris to reply to her letter. Alberta is scolding him for not writing. If Mother buys the farm, he has a proposition for her but would prefer she buy something in California. Things are pretty much at a standstill. He doesn’t expect to come home for at least 2 – 3 months. He misses her and asks about “the boy” and other family members. He saw the president and Colonel House. He is sending a clipping of the sinking of the Lucia. Hazel wrote to say she has not received any of his letters; perhaps they were on ships that sank. His friend in California has been admonishing him for not writing. Other letters from J. R. Moore are in series 3, subseries 4, below.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Moore, Myrtle. 1906 Feb. 10
2 3 23   Letter : ALS, Louisburg, Kan., to Callie Moore [Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [3] p. on l leaf : folded  
        She is staying with Edna; sometimes she has to work pretty hard. She asks when Callie is going to visit. They skate quite a bit. Myrtle tells about correspondence from Ed and asks Callie to call him; asks about other boys in Kansas City, Mo. She is going to Geneva[’s] soon. Uncle Cam wrote Aunt Eddie that he was blind. Myrtle and Callie were cousins. Geneva Van Kirk was a cousin of Myrtle’s and Callie’s.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1905 Dec. 18
2 3 24   Letter : ALS, Hennessey, Indian [i.e. Oklahoma] Terr. to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [5] leaves + envelope  
        She never said she wouldn’t visit them; Callie’s father has disgraced the family by lying, but Carry will stand by Callie’s mother and the children; Carry will provide money for George to pull through; Callie’s father writes Carry, but she doesn’t believe what he says; he will be judged by his words; take care of Myrtle as she has no family; Carry will get to see her grandchild, Carrie Belle, soon; Charlien will be at their home and can wire her for assistance. Carry will visit them when possible but she will be organizing in Oklahoma for 6 months.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Mar. 14
2 3 25   Letter : ALS, Little Rock, Ark., to Callie [Moore Kansas City, Kan.]  
        2 p. on 1 leaf  
        She has been at Hot Springs, Ark., a marvelous place, with Aunt Eddie and children; wants to see Callie and family but hates to visit while their father is ill; will try to stop on the way to Nebraska; sends $10.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Mar. 26
2 3 26   Letter : ALS, Crossett, Ark., to Callie [Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [4] leaves  
        She wants Callie to go with her to Orleans, Neb., to learn to be as good as Sister Jones; it is getting to where there is a little more money; Aunt Eddie will be with the doctor when Callie receives this, and Carry prays she will do well; Charlien will be at Hot Springs [Ark.] for some time; Carry may have a layover in Kansas City; Callie can find out about trains to Orleans; Carry suggests what to bring and asks that Callie’s mother be at the train. Carry expects to stop and speak at the [alcoholics’ wives] Home [in Kansas City] on the return trip.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 May 4
2 3 27   Letter : ALS, Sapulpa, Indian Territory, to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [3] leaves + envelope  
        She found Aunt Eddie’s watch at the Gloyd’s, she asks questions about Callie’s father and other family members, Carry received a long letter from John to be published in The Hatchet about drink in South Africa, she is on her way to Arkansas, Charlien and family are well and staying with a good Christian family, Carry is lonely at times, she misses her sister, she regrets not being there when she died, she pities Callie’s father but may have to expose his evil.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 June 5
2 3 28   Letter : ALS, Hope, Ark., to Callie [Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [3] leaves  
        She left Hot Springs [Ark.] this morning; Charlien is slowly improving; Clint Moore was there and was improving. Carry would like Callie to take care of her, perhaps after Callie is no longer needed at home; though too infrequent, Callie’s letters are precious; Carry has not replied to John; if he marries as he has said, he’ll never come home again; the children in Texas are well and learning fast; she is in good health but is slower; she is anxious for Callie’s father; she asks of Myrtle’s whereabouts; she wants to take Myrtle to Chicago if Myrtle would be ready; she asks Callie and family to write her at Memphis, Tenn.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 June 6
2 3 29   Letter : ALS, , Camden, Ark., to [Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        She asks Callie to write about the money Carry sent to clear up confusion as to the amount, once thought Callie would be at her side to assist in these matters.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Oct. 27
2 3 30   Letter : ALS, Roswell, N.M., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] leaves + envelope  
        She hopes Callie’s illness is cured, she tells Callie to study at every opportunity, she sends money for the doctor, she asks Callie to write her in Guthrie as soon as Callie receives this, Charlien seems to be doing as well as expected, Carry had a bad spell but is improving, she asks about Callie’s father and Myrtle. In an appended note to Myrtle, Carry admonishes her to avoid bad company and stay healthy, Carry says she would like to send Myrtle The Hatchet if Myrtle would provide an address, Carry asks Myrtle to write her, Geneva [Van Kirk, a niece] is going to have an heir and is glad of it.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. [not after
2 3 31   Letter : ALS, Danville, Ark., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan. 1906 Nov. 20]
        [2] leaves + envelope  
        She understands Myrtle is jobless in Kansas City; she asks Callie to find Myrtle and have her write; Carry says Callie’s father went to Mr. Foster and asked him to write Carry & beg her forgiveness; she replied that she would be glad to hear from Campbell that he repented; he wanted Carry to write him and said he was willing to settle things; she doesn’t believe him; she asks for news about Myrtle; Alex & Glorydie are at Hot Springs, Ark.; Carry and Charlien will go to Florida via Tennessee; it has been good to have Charlien and her daughter with her; she asks about the divorce.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Dec. 10
2 3 32   Letter : ALS, Knoxville, Tenn., to Callie [Moore, Kansas City, Kan.]  
        [2] leaves  
        She has received letters from Callie and her mother; she wishes Callie can be cured of her tremor; she asks Callie and George to find Myrtle and tell her Carry wants to go on a trip with her; she fears Myrtle may go with the wrong crowd; she asks about Callie’s father; Carry says she will not be in Missouri or Oklahoma Territory until spring; Charlien decided at the last minute not to accompany her; Carry will be in Washington, D.C., then to Florida; Aunt Annie and her 2 girls may join her in Florida; Carry admonishes Callie to set a good example for the boys; Carry’s health is good, and she is getting to be a better lecturer all the time; Callie should have her mother read this letter to the family.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Dec. 28
2 3 33   Letter : ALS, Roanoke, Va., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        1 p. + envelope  
        She sends Christmas money; asks about Myrtle; will be in Washington, D.C., next week; talks of God’s Gift of Christmas.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1907 Mar. 12
2 3 34   Letter : ALS, Boston, Mass., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] p. on 1 leaf + envelope  
        She is anxious for news of Myrtle’s death, Myrtle is now at rest with the 2 others in Belton [Mo.], Myrtle told Carry she was unafraid of death, Carry is glad Myrtle’s suffering is over, Carry asks about Callie’s father and her sister’s estate, Carry expresses sorrow she did not will it to the [alcoholics’ wives] Home, Carry expects to go to Kansas next month, she is in a theater here [Boston] with heavy expenses, Charlien is as usual, Carry sends a dollar to Joe.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1907 Oct. 20
2 3 35   Letter : ALS, Shelbyville, Ky., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] leaves + envelope  
        She says it’s not good to keep her waiting on a letter; Gloyd McNabb writes she does not hear from Callie either; Carry wishes George would write also; she asks about Joe; she has been in the workhouse but got out all right; she is lecturing in Kentucky until November 1, then going to the Purity Convention in Battle Creek, Mich., then to Washington, D.C.; she has been bilious; she asks Callie to write; she asks about boyfriends; she believes Callie is not strong enough to marry; she asks about Callie’s spiritual life; she will not loan Callie $10 until she hears from her; Callie doesn’t treat her well; she will send her a letter she just received from “daughter Carrie” [sic]; Carry asks why Aunt Eddie’s estate has not been settled and tells Callie to write to the involved parties.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1907 Dec. 13
2 3 36   Letter : ALS, Birmingham, Ala., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [2] leaves + envelope  
        She admits she is a poor correspondent; she feels Callie’s family is blessed to have John with them; Carry hopes he will write her; she feels ashamed Callie was “offering” herself to the [job? financial?] market and believes Callie was not telling her true feelings; Carry is sending her a picture in the hope that Callie never speaks thusly again; Carry asks about boyfriends; she is sending money for Mrs. Jepson for inmates for Christmas; Carry has had high expenses lately; she received the handkerchief Mrs. Jepson sent; she tells Callie to assist Mrs. Jepson in choosing presents for inmates; Carry’s secretary has picked [Mrs. Jepson?] out, so it will do no good to tell him about Carry’s husband - hunting niece; she wishes them a good New Year.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 Feb. 12
2 3 37   Note : holograph, Jacksonville, Fla., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        postcard : photocopy (2 leaves)  
        She admonishes Callie to write, asks how people at home are doing. On the recto is a photo of Carry.  
        Photocopy of original in the photograph collection.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 Feb. 28
2 3 38   Note : holograph, Key West, Fla., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        postcard  
        She asked if Callie received the jacket she sent; received George’s note; bought this postcard, “All Nations are Welcome Except Carrie,” in Key West, Fla., today; is in good health; is sorry to hear Callie’s mother has not been well.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 May 29
2 3 39   Letter : ALS, Blairsville, Pa., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [3] leaves  
        She has sent Callie $5, which George can retrieve; has not heard from Carrie Belle [McNabb]; does not get mail often in her travels; wants Callie and Carrie Belle to have good manners, be thankful, express thanks, be polite, wear modest clothing (“no outlandish hats that remind one of empty heads”); will speak at Wathena, Kan., and asks Callie to see her there with Carrie Belle at the big Chautauqua; wants Carrie Belle to stay a month with her and Callie to meet her in Lincoln, Neb., on July 4; cannot write because of pain in her arm; tells her to be sure and go to Independence [Mo.] and see all the relatives in Kansas City.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 June 23
2 3 40   Note : holograph, Hicksville, Ohio, to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        postal card  
        She will wire or write Carrie Belle [McNabb] upon her return with information about where to meet her, she will ensure that Carrie Belle will have a good trip this summer, she asks Callie to give Carrie Belle her medal to wear on the trip, Carry has a lame shoulder.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1908 July 10
2 3 41   Letter : ALS, Omaha, Neb., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        1 p. + envelope  
        She sends $10 for a trip to Niagara Falls, Carrie Belle and she are having a fine time together, Carry’s arm is not doing well and she cannot write, she can help Callie’s mother with debts as soon as she hears from her.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Omer, F. [not after
2 3 42   Invitation : Kansas City, Ka[n]s., to Callie and George Moore [Kansas City, Kan.] 1907 Dec. 31]
        l p. + envelope : inside  
        Invitation to the Dec. 31, 1907, wedding of Grace Omer & Leo Mowry.  
Box Ser. Fol.   William Woods College (Fulton, Mo.) [not after
2 3 43   Invitation : Fulton, Mo., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan. Apr. 30, 1907]
        1 p. + envelope  
        Invitation to the May 30 [1907] commencement exercises.  
        With this is filed: Commencement exercises, May twenty - first to May thirtieth.  
Box Ser. Fol.   [?], Cora. 1906 June 18
2 3 44   Letter : ALS, Smithville, Mo., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        9:00 PM  
        A letter from a former classmate at William Woods College (Fulton, Mo.) She has often wondered what Callie was doing but didn’t have Callie’s address. She asks about Myrtle [Moore]. Cora talks about her job as a bookkeeper in the telephone office. She tells about the activities of other former classmates and acquaintances, describes tricks played on a newly-married couple, describes her boyfriend. She tells Callie she continued the chain letter Callie sent. She is nostalgic for the College, asks about some of Callie’s family. She says she will visit sometime when in Kansas City. She discusses the weather. She describes some social events. She suggests Callie might come sometime with “the base ball boys” and visit. She would like to see some of their friends again.  
Box Ser. Fol.   [?], Pearl. 1908 June 11
2 3 45   Letter : ALS, Medicine Lodge, Kan., to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        [3] p. on 1 leaf : folded + envelope  
        She thanks Callie for her invitation and asks if a September or October visit would be acceptable. Pearl asks if Callie would want to visit her in the summer. She talks about flooding. Dora has finished at Barber County [Kan.] High School and is visiting Garden City [Kan.] before she finds a job. Pearl’s father has bought Carry Nation’s former house, Pearl will send photos of it. She has learned to skate. The envelope is postmarked Smithville, Mo., June 19, 1908.  
Box Ser. Fol.   [?], Polly. [n.d.]
2 3 46   Letter : ALS [Kansas City, Kan.?] to Callie Moore [Kansas City, Kan.]  
        1:00 PM  
        A letter from “Fay”; she is fine after the “pic[nic?],” as is Mr. Jack; she wants Callie to attend more of them; she may go to the camp tonight; Callie’s hat is “sweet”; Fay asks Callie to tell Jake hello; Fay may go to Texas.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Moore, Callie (Callie Bell), 1886 – 1977. Nov. 1, 1906
2 3 47   Deposit slips : Riverview State Bank.  
        3 items  
        Each slip shows the amount of currency, silver, and checks deposited.  
           
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 4
 
MC (744)       Moore, M. D. (Maria Dillon Robinson), 1862 – 1930. 1906 – 1918
        Letters received.  
        3 items  
        One letter from Carry Nation urging her to to escape and containing family news and 2 letters from Dillon’s son J. R., a World War I sailor in the Atlantic, describing his experiences.  
        Arranged chronologically.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry Amelia, 1846 – 1911. 1906 Nov. 4
2 3 48   Letter : Roswell, N.M., to Dellie [Moore, Kansas City, Kan.?]  
        1 leaf  
        A letter in which she enclosed a letter, not included, containing some falsehoods from a male detractor, possibly her brother; urged Dellie to escape as quietly as possible; asked that Dellie write her at Hot Springs, Ark., where she was going the next day; stated her health was good; asked how Callie Moore was & if she received the $25 Carry sent; and requested information about the divorce including newspaper notices. A postscript noted that Annie sent the enclosed letter, and that Carry was trying to open her eyes to the lies contained in it. Other documents written by Carry Nation are in series 1 and 2, above.  
Box Ser. Fol.   Moore J. R. (Jacob Robinson) 1918 June 29 – July 7
2 3 49   Letters : ALS, Washington, D.C., to M. D. Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        2 items  
        Letters to M. D. Moore from her son, a sailor in World War I. The letters tell of life in the Navy; discuss family & friends at home; talk about family matters; mention engagements with German submarines; express regret that military security forbids him from telling more about his exploits; and talk about visiting Washington, D.C. Other letters from J. R. Moore are in series 3, subseries 3, above.  
        Contents: Item 1. [19]18 June 29. — Item 2. 1918 July 7.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 5
 
MC (744)          
Box Ser. Fol.   Little, A. W. 1906 Nov. 1
2 3 50   Note : typescript, Kansas City, Kan., to George Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        postal card  
        Campaign note requesting George Moore’s support in Dr. A. W. Little’s quest for the Republican nomination for coroner in Wyandotte County, Kan.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 6
 
MC (744)          
Box Ser. Fol.   Dickey, B. E. [not after 1907 Feb. 25]
2 3 51   Letter : ALS, Pittsburg, Pa., to Myrtle Moore, Kansas City, Kan.  
        7 leaves  
        A letter to a friend in which he talks about his job and activities and expresses his unhappiness with Pittsburg (now Pittsburgh).  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 7
 
MC (744)          
Box Ser. Fol.   Nation, Carry A. 1908 May 27
2 3 52   Pennsylvania Railroad Company ticket coupon book, stamped 1908 May 27 and signed by Carry A. Nation in three places.  
       
SERIES 3 – SUBSERIES 8
 
MC (744)          
Box Ser. Fol.   Postcard : unsigned, to Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan. 1906 Nov. 16
2 3 53   1 item : leather  
        Addressed to Miss Callie Moore, Kansas City, Kan. Postage stamp missing. Reverse side has a drawing of a young woman in an old-fashioned bathing costume walking on a beach and carrying a rope connected to a small bear wearing a blue coat and walking upright several feet behind her. The text “Maude with her little Bear behind” is printed on the upper left of the drawing.  

Related Records and Collections

The following Kansas Historical Society manuscript collections (MC) contain a significant quantity of material on prohibition and temperance. Many other collections also include information. Researchers may wish to consult the appropriate catalogs for additional sources. All of the microfilm listed below is available through interlibrary loan.

Lewis Allen Alderson collection, MC 255; folder list available

Nelson Case, “Speeches,” 1867 – 1920, microfilm MS 293

Jess C. Denious collection, MC 25; finding aid available

Edith Dillon miscellaneous collection

Spencer Agassiz Gard miscellaneous collection

Edwin C. Hadley miscellaneous collection

George H. Hodges collection, MC 58; finding aid available

Richard Joseph Hopkins collection, MC 60

Kansas State Temperance Union history collection, MC 603

Kansas Women’s Christian Temperance Union/Mary Evelyn Dobbs collection, MC 170; finding aid available

Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph collection, microfilm MS 1665; finding aid available

Jacob C. Ruppenthal collection, MC 79; partial contents lists available

John Pierce St. John collection, MC 494

Richard Taylor collection, MC 770; partial folder list available

Temperance history collection, MC 645

Drusilla Wilson miscellaneous collection

The Kansas Historical Society Library has a large number of references to published materials written by and about Carry Nation. Consult the catalogs and other finding aids for additional information.

In the Cecil Howes manuscript collection, no. 393, are three other letters from Carry Nation: two undated and one dated 18 February 1903. In the F. M. Steves & Sons collection, no. 74, there is a 1902 letter from her to someone with the surname Falcrum and correspondence, 1912 – 1913, between the executor of her estate and F. M. Steves, proprietor of the Topeka, Kansas, printing company that published her autobiography.

Letters and petitions, 1901, to Governor William Stanley urging him to pardon Carrie Nation are in the records of the Office of the Governor, record group 252, Pardon and Parole Files, ca. 1863 – ca. 1969, subseries I, box 97, Carrie Nation file, in the State archives holdings of the Kansas Historical Society.

Separated Material

Wichita State University (Kansas), Ablah Library, Special Collections, has a separate Carry A. Nation Collection [1901?] – 1905, no. 80 - 3, 0.25 linear feet, consisting of two letters written to Brother James by Carry Nation, a telegram to M. B. Jones, a bail bond, and a photograph. A finding aid is available and on their website: http://specialcollections.wichita.edu/collections/ms/80-03/80-3-A.HTML

In 1999, Jerald and Dianne Kelly also donated printed materials and books; photographs; and clothing, personal items, and other artifacts associated with Carry Nation and her activities. These have been accessioned separately into the Kansas Historical Society’s library and photograph collections, and into the Kansas Museum of History collections, respectively, and are not described in this finding aid.

Other Finding Aid

Copies of this finding aid are available in the Kansas Historical Society’s reference Library and on its web site, http://www.kshs.org

Bibliography

Asbury, Herbert. Carry Nation. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1929. Kansas Historical Society library call number K B N19as.

Bader, Robert Smith. “Mrs. Nation,” Kansas History: A Journal of the Central Plains 7, no. 4 (1984), 246 – 62. Available on reference shelves in the Research Room.

Beals, Carleton. Cyclone Carry: The Story of Carry Nation. Philadelphia, Chilton Co., Book Division, ©1962. KHS call number K B N19b.

Braniff, Edward Andrew. “How I Ran Out on Carry Nation,” Commonweal 47, no. 23 (19 Mar. 1948), 558 – 60. KHS call number GL 051 C72c v.47 no.23 p.558.

City directories, Kansas City, Kansas, and Kansas City, Missouri, 1900 – 1954. KHS.

Grace, Fran. Carry A. Nation: Retelling the Life. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, © 2001. KHS call number K B N19g.

Grace, Fran. Electronic correspondence with Bob Knecht, Kansas Historical Society, 20 Sept. – 5 Oct. 1999. Copies in accession file.

Index to the 1905 State Census of Kansas for the Cities of Kansas City, Argentine, and Rosedale[,] Kansas: Moore. Topeka: Kansas Historical Society, 1992. Kansas census microfilm 1905 - KS - 21.

Ireland, Lynda. Electronic correspondence with Bob Knecht, Kansas Historical Society, 30 Sept. – 5 Oct. 1999. Copies in accession file.

Kansas. [State Board of Agriculture.] Decennial Census, Kansas, 1905: Wyandotte County. Topeka: Kansas Historical Society, 1960. KHS Kansas census microfilm 1905 - K - 177, - 179.

The Kansas City Kansan, 21 January 1977. KHS newspaper microfilm K - 508.

Kansas City, Kan. City Clerk’s Office. “Mortality Record,” vol. B. Genealogical Society of Utah microfilm 1605149, KHS microfilm AR - 4505.

The Kansas City Kansas Globe, 22 Feb. 1907. KHS newspaper microfilm K - 107.

The Kansas City Star, 21 Jan. 1977.

Nation, C. A. (1909). The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, Revised ed., Topeka, Kansas: F. M. Steves & Sons. KHS call number K B N19 1909(last).

Taylor, Robert Lewis. Vessel of Wrath: The Life and Times of Carry Nation. New York, N.Y: New American Library, ©1966. KHS call number K B N19t.

Thorndale, William, and William Dollarhide, Map Guide to the U.S. Federal Censuses, 1790 – 1920. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1987. Available on reference shelves in the Research Room.

U.S. Census Bureau. Census indexes: Kansas, 1880 – 1920. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, 1962. Microfilm.

U.S. Census Bureau. Population Schedules of the Eighth Census of the United States, 1860: Missouri: vol. 4, p. 835. Washington: National Archives, National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, 1967. National Archives microfilm M - 653, roll 612; KHS out-of-State census microfilm 1860 - M - 612.

U.S. Census Bureau. 13th Census, 1910: Kansas: Wyandotte County: enumeration district 179. Washington, D.C.: [National Archives and Records Service, n.d.]. National Archives microfilm T - 624, roll 461; KHS Kansas census microfilm 1910 - K - 31.

Index Terms

Access Points

Persons

Brand, Harriet W. (correspondent)

Braniff, Edward Andrew. (correspondent)

Dickinson, A. M. (correspondent)

Godard, Aretas Allen, 1855- (correspondent)

Kohler, Albert. (correspondent)

Miller, Nyle H. (correspondent)

Moore, Callie (Callie Bell), 1886–1977. (subject & correspondent)

Stanley, William Eugene, 1844-1910. (correspondent)

Corporate Names

Blue Ribbon Gospel Temperance Union. (correspondent)

Kansas. Governor (1899–1903 : Stanley) (correspondent)

Kansas. Office of the Attorney General. (correspondent)

Kansas State Historical Society. (correspondent)

Leicester & District Temperance Union. (correspondent)

Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. (correspondent)

Family Names

Moore family.

Geographic Names

Great Britain.

Southwestern States.

United States.

United States, Central. (local)

Subjects

American diaries — Southwestern states.

American diaries — United States, Central. (Local term)

Prohibition–Great Britain.

Prohibition–Kansas.

Prohibition–United States.

Document Types

Albums — Southwestern states.

Diaries. (AAT)

Scrapbooks — Southwestern states.

Souvenirs (Keepsakes)

Titles

La Vie heureuse.

Occupations

Prohibitionists–Kansas.

Prohibitionists–United States.

Women social reformers — United States.

Function

Protesting. (Art & Architecture Thesaurus)

Additional Information for Researchers

Restrictions on Access

None.

Restrictions on Use

The issue of copyright was not addressed when the items in series 2 and 3 were donated and loaned to the Kansas Historical Society; copyright to those papers is assumed to belong to the heirs of the creators or their assigns. Any copyright owned by the Carry National Memorial Home (Medicine Lodge, Kans.) or Jerald and Dianne Kelly was transferred to the Kansas State Historical Society at the time of their respective donations of papers. See “Acquisition Information,” below, for a description of documents included in each accession.

Notice: This material may be protected by copyright law (Title 17, U.S. Code). The user is cautioned that the publication of the contents of this collection may be construed as constituting a violation of literary property rights. These rights derive from the principle of common law, affirmed in the copyright law of 1976 as amended, that the writer of an unpublished letter or other manuscript has the sole right to publish the contents thereof unless he or she affirmatively parts with that right; the right descends to his or her legal heirs regardless of the ownership of the physical manuscript itself. It is the responsibility of a user or his or her publisher to secure the permission of the owner of literary property rights in unpublished writing.

Researchers using this collection are required to use digital images or photocopies to protect the originals; Kansas Historical Society restriction.

Custodial History

Papers given in 1990 by the Carry Nation Memorial Home, Medicine Lodge, Kansas (accession no. 1990MS102) form series 1 of the collection.

Items (obtained from several sources over time) in the Kansas Historical Society’s Carry Nation miscellaneous collection were combined with the later accessions in 1990 and 1999 to form a unified collection. These materials form series 2 of the Carry Amelia Nation Papers collection.

In 1999, documents that had been discovered in a trunk (originally belonging to Callie Moore Blum) in Kansas City, Kansas, were donated by Jerald and Dianne Kelly (accession no. 1999--283.01). These documents form series 3 of the collection. Dianne Kelly is the granddaughter of Callie Moore Blum, and the great grand-niece of Carry Amelia Nation.

Alternative Form Available

Also available on Kansas Memory on the Internet.

Preferred Citation

[identification of individual item, series and subseries], Carry Amelia Nation papers, 1870 – 1961 (bulk 1872 – 1909), ms. collection no. 744, State Archives & Library, Kansas Historical Society.

Acquisition Information

The Diary, 1872 – 1900, and Scrapbook, 1870 – 1900, series 1, were given by the Carry Nation Memorial Home (Medicine Lodge, Kans.) in 1990, accession no. 1990MS102. Papers in series 2 formed the original KSHS Carry Nation miscellaneous ms. collection. The papers in series 3 were given by Jerald and Dianne Kelly in 1999, accession no. 1999-283.01, with other photographs, books, articles of clothing, and personal items belonging to Carry Nation. Sources are listed in the description of each item in the “Detailed Description of the Collection” below.

Processing Information

The original Carry Nation miscellaneous collection was probably processed in the late 1950s or early 1960s. The collection was reprocessed in 1999 by Robert L. Knecht to include the additional materials received in 1990 and 1999. The original item level finding aid, written 1999-2002 by Robert L. Knecht, was reformatted and edited by Kathleen Rogge, Lela Barnes intern, in 2007 to reflect a folder level description and made both print and web accessible.

Accruals

No additions to this collection are expected.