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Kansas Archeology Training Program Past Field School Sites

Click here for a Kansas county map showing locations of KATP sites. Click on thumbnail of photo for a larger view.

2005-2010
1995 - 2004
1985 - 1994
1975 - 1984

 1984 - Comanche County, Bell Site (14CM407)

  • The Bell Site is a Wilmore complex site occupied during the Middle Ceramic period (ca. A.D. 1000-1500). During this KATP event 2,021 hours of labor were donated by 47 KAA members.

  • Reported in: Don Rowlison (1984) "Excavations at the Bell Site Provide New Information from South-Central Kansas" Kansas Preservation 6(6):1-2; Don photo Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1984Rowlison (1985) "A Preliminary Report of the Bell Site and the 1984 Kansas Archeology Training Program" Journal of the KAA 5(3):117-129; Joseph E. Beaver (1999) "Faunal Analysis of the Bell Site (14CM407): Implications for Wilmore Complex Subsistence" The Kansas Anthropologist 20:107-122; C. Tod Bevitt (1999) "An Archeologist's Notebook: The Wilmore Complex of the Middle Ceramic Period on the Southern High Plains of South-Central and Southwest Kansas" Kansas Preservation 21(1):5-7, 12; C. Tod Bevitt (1999) "Life on the High Plains Border: Archeological Investigation of Three Late Prehistoric Habitation Sites in Southwest Kansas" The Kansas Anthropologist 20:1-106

 1983 - Rice County, Crandall Site (14RC420)

  • This is a Little River focus Great Bend aspect habitation site. Eighty-two KAA volunteers donated 2,799 hours toward the study of this Protohistoric period (ca. A.D. 1541-1800) site.

  • Reported in: Don Rowlison (1983) "Central Kansas Site is Location of KAA Dig" Kansas Preservation 6(1):1-3; Randall M. Thies (1987) "From the Pueblos to the Plains: Origins of Certain Southwestern Sherds Found at Saxman and Crandall" Journal of the KAA 6(9):226-232

1982 - Norton County, Le Beau Site (14NT301)

  • photo Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1982The Le Beau Site was an Upper Republican phase (Central Plains tradition) earthlodge site occupied during the Middle Ceramic period (ca. A.D. 1000 - 1500). During the 1982 KATP, 89 KAA members volunteered approximately 3,827 hours of labor.

  • Reported in: Don Rowlison (1982) "KAA Dig in Northwest Kansas a Success," Kansas Preservation 4(6):1-2; Don Rowlison (1983) "The Le Beau Site, 14NT301: A Preliminary Report of the Eighth Annual Kansas Archeology Training Program" Journal of the KAA 4(1-3):2-12

1981 - Rice County, Kermit Hayes Site (14RC306)

  • 14RC301The Kermit Hayes Site was a small protohistoric (ca. A.D. 1541-1800) habitation site occupied by members of the Little River focus of the Great Bend aspect. Sixty KAA members volunteered 2,600 hours of labor in the study of this site.

  • Reported in: Don Rowlison (1981) "K.A.A. Dig and Kansas Archeology Training Program Uncovers Pithouses Near Lyons" Journal of the KAA 1(5 & 6):118-120; Don Rowlison (1981) "KAA Dig Uncovers Pithouses Near Lyons" Kansas Preservation 3(6):1-2

photo Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1980 1980 - Mitchell County, 14ML417

  • Forty-seven KAA volunteers donated 2,900 hours of labor during the KATP event which exposed the remains of an earthlodge occupied by an Upper Republican group (Central Plains tradition) during the Middle Ceramic period (ca. A.D. 1000-1500).

  • Reported in: Mark Latham (2004) "A Solomon River Phase Habitation Site (14ML417): Results of the 1980 KATP Field School" The Kansas Anthropologist 25:1-73

 1979 - Coffey County, 14CF357 & 14CF369

  • Sixty KAA volunteers provided approximately 3,000 hours of labor on these two prehistoric sites during this KATP event. Both sites were habitation areas occupied by members of the Pomona focus during the Middle Ceramic period (ca. A.D. 1000-1500).

  • Reported in: Randall M. Thies (1981) Archeological Investigations at John Redmond Reservoir, East Central Kansas, 1979 Report on file, Archeology Office, Kansas State Historical Society.

 1978 - photo Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1978Rice County, Tobias Site (14RC8)

  • During the second KATP at the Tobias Site, 73 KAA members volunteered a total of 3,710 hours of labor.

1977 - Rice County, Tobias Site (14RC8)

  • The Tobias Site is a protohistoric village site identified as belonging to the Little River focus of the Great Bend aspect. It was inhabited by the people who the Spanish explorer Coronado referred to as "Quivirans" during his 1541 visit to the region. They are believed to be ancestors of the modern-day Wichita Indians. This site is owned by the Kansas State Historical Society. It is one of nine archeological sites in the Little River Archeological District on the National Register of Historic Places. The Tobias Site and the nearby C.F. Thompson site are listed as National Historic Landmarks under the name Tobias-Thompson Archeological Complex. Fifty KAA members volunteered 3,500 hours during the 1977 KATP.

  • Reported in: Thomas A. Witty, Jr. (1977) "The 1977 Kansas Anthropological Association Dig and Kansas Archeology Training Program: The Tobias Dig" KAA Newsletter 23(1):1-7

1976 - Scott County, El Quartelejo (14SC1)

photo Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1976

  • Eighty KAA members volunteered approximately 3,440 hours of labor during this year's KATP event at El Quartelejo.
  • Reported in: Bruce A. Jones (1976) "Recent Archeological Investigations in Lake Scott State Park" KAA Newsletter 22(1 & 2):1-5

1975 - Scott County, Timber Canyon Site (14SC302) & El Quartelejo (14SC1)

  • During the 1975 KATP 90 KAA volunteers contributed 1,948 hours to enhance our understanding of these two important archeological sites.

  • Kansas Archeology Training Program, 1975The cultural affiliation of the Timber Canyon Site remains unknown, but the site is listed as a component of a National Historic Landmark District.

  • El Quartelejo is the northernmost pueblo in the United States and the only Puebloan site in Kansas. It was occupied by Puebloans who fled Spanish oppression in the Southwest during the early Historic period, ca. A.D. 1680. The site is listed as a National Historic Landmark. Located in Lake Scott State Park, interpretation at this open-air site consists of etched-metal markers placed around the restored foundation. There are no associated museum facilities.

  • Reported in: Thomas A. Witty, Jr. (1975) "Report of the 1975 Lake Scott Kansas Anthropological Association Dig and Kansas Archeology Training School Activities" Journal of the KAA 21(1 & 2):1-9; Thomas A. Witty, Jr. (1975) "Kansas Anthropological Association Dig and First Kansas Training School" KAA Newsletter 20(5 & 6):3-14

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