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Kansas Historical Quarterly - As Published - November 1936

November 1936 (vol. 5, no. 4, pages 419 to 430
Transcribed by lhn; additional HTML by Susan Stafford;
digitized with permission of the Kansas Historical Society.

An analysis of the composition of the population of Kansas was presented in an article published in The Southwestern Social Science Quarterly of Austin, Tex., for September, 1935. The paper, "Some Demographic Characteristics of the Population of Kansas," by Carroll D. Clark and Roy L. Roberts, was read before the sociology section of the Southwestern Social Science association meeting at Oklahoma City, Okla., April 20, 1935.

Cowley county history is featured in Walter D. Hutchinson's column, "Folks Hereabouts," appearing frequently in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler. More of the county's history is also published in occasional feature articles under the heading "Cowley County Reminiscences."

Pre-movie days in Hutchinson as recalled by L. A. Meece to Elliott Penner, reporter, were described in an article printed in the Hutchinson Herald, January 26, 1936. A story quoting from James H. Birch's account of the Indian battle fought on site of Kinsley, on Coon creek, was recounted in the Herald, January 29. The battle is said to have occurred in May, 1848.

First white settlement in Allen county was discussed in articles appearing in the Iola Daily Register, February 20 and 21, 1936. The Register also conducted a questions and answers column on Allen county history under the title "Know Your County." The series, which ran for several weeks, started with the issue of March 9.

The history of the Gove County Republican-Gazette, which was founded at Gove City, April 9, 1886, was briefly reviewed in its issue of March 26, 1936.

Foreign settlements in Republic county were mentioned by Ida L. Smith in an article entitled "National Group Settlements" printed in the spring, 1936, issue of The Aerend, quarterly publication of Fort Hays Kansas State College. Included among the stories featured in the summer number were the following of historical interest: "Mirage [in western Kansas]," by Thomas Freeman; "The Fall of Rome [Ellis county]," by Jane Flood, and "Victoria Hunt club Ball," by Paul King.

"Members of First Colored Family in Emporia Still Living," an article in the Emporia Gazette of April 89, 1936, reported. Joe Odair and his sister, Mrs. Ellen Burton, are the members who arrived in 1863.

Gove county's fiftieth birthday was observed with special ceremonies held at Gove City, September 2, 3, and 4, 1936. The Gove County Republican-Gazette, of Gove City, published several historical stories during the golden jubilee year. Included among these were: Excerpts from the first journal of the county commissioners, in the April 23 number, John F. Lindquist's reminiscences of the county, in the August 6 issue, and Lewis A. Lincoln's recollections, August 27. Mrs. A. M. Weir also contributed a series of articles on Earl Grinnell which appeared in the issues of August 13, September 3, 17, 24, and October 22. The valuation of Gove county's crops, livestock and taxable property for the past ten years was discussed by W. P. Harrington in the November 5 number.

Frankfort school history was briefly reviewed in the Frankfort Daily Index, May 15, 1936. The first school was organized in March, 1869.

Arkansas City's golfing history was recorded by Joe  Bly in an article entitled "Tomato Cans Were Basis for First Golf Course in the City" appearing in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, May 16, 1936.

Old-timers of Crawford county participated in the festivities held at Pittsburg, May 20, 1936, celebrating the sixtieth anniversary of the city's founding. A special historical supplement issued by the Pittsburg Headlight and Sun, May 19, included the following stories: "Franklin Playter a Major Figure Here During Early Days," "Pittsburg Has Been the Coal Capital of Kansas Many Years," "Churches Here Develop With City's Growth," "Tiny Settlement of 60 Years Ago Now Is Kansas Coal Capital," "G. W. Kidder Recalls Early Days In City," "Zinc Smelters Were Major Industry in Early Days Here," "First White Child Born in Crawford County [Elisha Black] Still Lives," "Schmidt 27th Man to Serve City as Mayor," "Water Supply Here Problem in Early Days," "City Was Live Camp in 1883," and "Recalls First City Platting."

Dighton's Christian Church, organized on May 26, 1886, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of its founding, May 31, 1936. A brief history of the church was published in the Dighton Herald, June 4.

The history of Newton's Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, which observed its golden jubilee, June 7,1936, was reviewed in the Newton Harvey County News, June 4, Evening Kansan-Republican, June 6, and Journal, June 11.

Concord, Helena, and Mashenah, three ghost towns of Atchison county, were mentioned in the Atchison Daily Globe, June 10, 1936.

Biographical sketches of several of Smith county's pioneers were printed in the Smith County Review, of Smith Center, June 11 and 25, 1936.

The history of the Kansas Southwestern Railroad Co., organized August 27, 1885, as the Geuda Springs, Caldwell and Western Railroad Co., was reviewed in an article entitled "Kansas-Southwestern Bids Adieu to A. C.," in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, June 25, 1936.

Fifty years of electric lighting in Great Bend was discussed in the Great Bend Tribune, June 30, 1936.

The life of Father Paul Mary Ponziglione, early Kansas missionary, was reviewed by Sister Mary Paul Fitzgerald in an article entitled "A Jesuit Circuit Rider," in the July, 1936, number of Mid-America, a Catholic historical magazine published at Chicago.

Dr. James C. Malin, associate editor of The Kansas Historical Quarterly and contributor of articles on Kinsley's boom and the farm population turnover in Kansas to the Quarterly during 1935, has written another paper in the series which was published in the July, 1936, issue of Agricultural History, sponsored by the Agricultural History Society of Washington, D. C. The article was entitled "The Adaptation of the Agricultural System to Sub-Humid Environment," and illustrated the activities of the Wayne Township Farmers' Club of Edwards county in 1886 to 1893.

The experience of Mrs. Frank Todd in a "Trip in Concord Coach From Newton to Wichita in the Spring of 1870," was related in Victor Murdock's column in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, July 3, 1936.

A history of Corona lodge No. 137, 1. 0. 0. F., instituted in Dodge City, July 6, 1876, was briefly sketched in the Dodge City Daily Globe, July 4, 1936.

The Wichita Sunday Beacon issued a 116-page anniversary edition, July 5, 1936. The occasion was the eighth anniversary of the taking over of the newspaper by Max, Louis and John Levand.

420 THE KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

"Members of First Colored Family in Emporia Still Living," an article in the Emporia Gazette of April 9, 1936, reported. Joe Odair and his sister, Mrs. Ellen Burton, are the members who arrived in 1863.

Gove county's fiftieth birthday was observed with special ceremonies held at Gove City, September 2, 3, and 4, 1936. The Gove County Republican-Gazette, of Gove City, published several historical stories during the golden jubilee year. Included among these were: Excerpts from the first journal of the county commissioners, in the April 23 number, John F. Lindquist's reminiscences of the county, in the August 6 issue, and Lewis A. Lincoln's recollections, August 27. Mrs. A. M. Weir also contributed a series of articles on early Grinnell which appeared in the issues of August 13, September 3, 17, 24, and October 22. The valuation of Gove county's crops, livestock and taxable property for the past ten years was discussed by W. P. Harrington in the November 5 number.

Frankfort school history was briefly reviewed in the Frankfort Daily Index, May 15, 1936. The first school was organized in March, 1869.

Arkansas City's golfing history was recorded by Joe Bly in an article entitled "Tomato Cans Were Basis for First Golf Course in the City," appearing in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, May 16, 1936.

Old-timers of Crawford county participated in the festivities held at Pittsburg, May 20, 1936, celebrating the sixtieth anniversary of the city's founding. A special historical supplement issued by the Pittsburg Headlight and Sun, May 19, included the following stories: "Franklin Playter a Major Figure Here During Early Days," "Pittsburg Has Been the Coal Capital of Kansas Many Years," "Churches Here Develop With City's Growth," "Tiny Settlement of 60 Years Ago Now Is Kansas Coal Capital," "G. W. Kidder Recalls Early Days in City," "Zinc Smelters Were Major Industry in Early Days Here," "First White Child Born in Crawford County [Elisha Black] Still Lives," "Schmidt 27th Man to Serve City as Mayor," "Water Supply Here Problem in Early Days," "City Was Live Camp in 1883," and "Recalls First City Platting."

Dighton's Christian Church, organized on May 26, 1886, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of its founding, May 31, 1936. A brief history of the church was published in the Dighton Herald, June 4.

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The history of Newton's Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church, which observed its golden jubilee, June 7,1936, was reviewed in the Newton Harvey County News, June 4, Evening Kansan-Republican, June 6, and Journal, June 11.

Concord, Helena, and Mashenah, three ghost towns of Atchison county, were mentioned in the Atchison Daily Globe, June 10, 1936.

Biographical sketches of several of Smith county's pioneers were printed in the Smith County Review, of Smith Center, June 11 and 25, 1936.

The history of the Kansas Southwestern Railroad Co., organized August 27, 1885, as the Geuda Springs, Caldwell and Western Railroad Co., was reviewed in an article entitled "Kansas-Southwestern Bids Adieu to A. C.," in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler, June 25, 1936.

Fifty years of electric lighting in Great Bend was discussed in the Great Bend Tribune, June 30, 1936.

The life of Father Paul Mary Ponziglione, early Kansas missionary, was reviewed by Sister Mary Paul Fitzgerald in an article entitled "A Jesuit Circuit Rider," in the July, 1936, number of Mid-America, a Catholic historical magazine published at Chicago.

Dr. James C. Malin, associate editor of The Kansas Historical Quarterly and contributor of articles on Kinsley's boom and the farm population turnover in Kansas to the Quarterly during 1935, has written another paper in the series which was published in the July, 1936, issue of Agricultural History, sponsored by the Agricultural History Society of Washington, D. C. The article was entitled "The Adaptation of the Agricultural System to Sub-Humid Environment," and illustrated the activities of the Wayne Township Farmers' Club of Edwards county in 1886 to 1893.

The experience of Mrs. Frank Todd in a "Trip in Concord Coach From Newton to Wichita in the Spring of 1870," was related in Victor Murdock's column in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, July 3, 1936.

A history of Corona lodge No. 137, I. O. O. F., instituted in Dodge City, July 6, 1876, was briefly sketched in the Dodge City Daily Globe, July 4, 1936.

The Wichita Sunday Beacon issued a 116-page anniversary edition, July 5, 1936. The occasion was the eighth anniversary of the taking over of the newspaper by Max, Louis and John Levand.

422 THE KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

A history of the cattle industry in early-day Kansas was briefly outlined in the Dodge City Daily Globe, July 9, 1936.

Pioneering in the Walnut river valley of Butler county was recalled by George Tong, of Leon, in the Wichita Sunday Eagle, July 12, 1936.

Chanute Tribune reporters interviewed early-day railroaders of the vicinity to gather material for their "Railroad Week" feature stories published during the week starting July 13, 1936.

Liberal post-office history was reviewed in The Southwest Tribune, of Liberal, July 16, 1936. A new post-office building was dedicated July 18.

Names of business houses operating in Wichita in 1881 were printed in Victor Murdock's front-page column in the (Evening) Eagle, July 18, 1936.

Atchison's railroad history was sketched by John Burke in the Atchison Daily Globe, July 23, 1936.

Historic Dodge City places were discussed by a visitor writing in the Clyde Republican, July 23, 1936.

Alfred M. Landon, governor of Kansas, was formally notified of his nomination as the Republican candidate for president of the United States at special ceremonies held on the south steps of the state house in Topeka, July 23, 1936. The Topeka Daily Capital, State Journal, and the Wichita Beacon issued special notificationday editions honoring the governor and the state's distinguished guests.

Wichita history was reviewed in the sixty-fourth anniversary edition of the Wichita Eagle, issued July 26, 1936.

Utica's history was briefly outlined in the Utica Star-Courier, July 30, 1936. The city was incorporated on July 26, 1911.

A brief biography of Dr. Barnum Brown, curator of the American Museum of Natural History, New York, appeared in an article entitled "An Eminent Bone Hunter Got His Start Gathering Sea Shells in Kansas" in the Kansas City (Mo.) Times, July 30, 1936. Doctor Brown was born near Carbondale.

Chisholm trail history was briefly sketched in the Coats Courant, July 30, 1936.

KANSAS HISTORY IN THE PRESS 423

"Eighty Years Ago Franklin, Kansas, Now Vanished, Was in the Limelight," was the title of a feature article in the Kansas City (Mo.) Star, August 1, 1936.

A review of the life of the late John Montgomery, publisher of the Junction City Union from 1888 to 1936, was printed in the Union, August 5, 1936.

The history of the First Methodist Church of Morganville, as written by Mrs. H. J. Merten and Mrs. W. H. Lennard, was published in The Tribune, of Morganville, August 6, 1936. The fiftieth anniversary of the building of the church was observed with ceremonies held August 2.

Barton county rural teachers for the 1936-1937 term were named in the Hoisington Dispatch, August 6, 1936.

The story of the Rev. Pardee Butler's enforced cruise on the Missouri river after expounding the cause of freedom in pro-slavery Atchison was retold in the Kansas City (Mo.) Times, August 7, 1936.

Several Kansas newspapers published articles in their summer issues recalling the grasshopper visitation of 1874. Included among these were: Wichita (Evening) Eagle, August 8 and 27, 1936; Clay Center Dispatch, August 11, and the Downs News, September 3.

Biographical sketches of Walter A. Huxman, governor-elect of Kansas, were printed in the Wichita Sunday Eagle, August 9, 1936, Kansas City (Mo.) Star and Wichita Beacon, November 8. A biographical sketch of Mrs. Huxman was also printed in the November 8 Beacon.

Great Bend's history was reviewed in detail in the Great Bend Tribune's forty-eight page sixtieth anniversary edition issued August 12, 1936. Extensive histories of the city's newspapers, schools, business houses, churches, telephone system, post office, clubs, electric lighting system, library, fire department, hotels, and railroads were printed. Pioneer biographies were sketched and names of the city's mayors and first county officials were featured. Included among the illustrations were a map of Barton county's oil pools, which accompanied a six-page history of the industry, and a plate showing points of interest in the Great Bend vicinity from 1806 to 1886. Sixty years' rainfall in Great Bend was recorded in table form. Other articles were headlined: "Egyptian Corn Introduced

424 THE KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

in County in Early '80's," "Mennonite Colony Moved Into Barton County in '70's, Securing Land in Pawnee Rock Vicinity," "Only Sign of Life Here When Don Dodge Came in '71 Was Dugout Where Post Office Stands," "Cyclone First Big Storm to Strike Here," "Pioneers Soon Learned Wheat the Best Crop," "County Lines Big Question in Early Days," "First Real Building Boom in Great Bend Took Place in 1878," and "Mennonites Credited with Introducing Turkey Wheat."

St. Paul's Lutheran Church, also known as the Clark's Creek Church, which celebrated the seventy-fifth anniversary of its founding, August 16, 1936, is the oldest Lutheran church of the Missouri Synod in Kansas. A history of the church was sketched in the Junction City Union, August 12, and the Republic, August 13.

The Hoisington Dispatch issued an illustrated "Anniversary Edition" August 13, 1936, celebrating the "Fiftieth Anniversary of the Founding of Hoisington and Building of the Missouri Pacific Railroad to This Point." Included among the special articles were: "Barton County Officers From 1872 to 1936," "Charter That Started the City of Hoisington," "Early Real Estate Deals," "Townships Organized," "Old Army Trail," "First Hoisington Child," "The First Physician," "Early Newspaper History of HoisingtonOther Interesting Early Day Stories," "Hoisington High-school Graduates," "The Last Buffalo," "Down Through the Years," "The First Livery Barn in Hoisington," "First Commercial Club," "Official Happenings of Hoisington From the First Official Meeting," and "Hoisington, 1886-1936." Other stories reviewed Barton county post office and club histories. Names of city officials and biographies of prominent citizens were printed. Fifty-year residents of the community were named in a special column appearing from August 13 to September 10, inclusive.

Napoleon Boone was the "first white child born in Kansas 108 years ago in Jefferson county," George Remsburg recalled in an article published in the Atchison Daily Globe, August 15, 1936.

The story of the writing of "What's the Matter With Kansas," William Allen White's famous editorial of forty years ago, was told in the Kansas City (Mo.) Times, August 15, 1936.

Businesses operating in the vicinity of William and Market streets in Wichita before the erection of the post-office building on the northwest corner fifty years ago were described by Victor Murdock in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, August 18, 1936.

KANSAS HISTORY IN THE PRESS 425

Gen. James G. Harbord, Pershing's chief of staff during the World War, spent the early years of his life in the hills northwest of Bushong, Kan., the Kansas City (Mo.) Times recalled in an article published August 19, 1936.

Hoxie observed the fiftieth anniversary of its founding with a three-day celebration held August 20 to 22, 1936. Included among the writers contributing articles to the special edition of the Hoxie Sentinel, issued August 20, were: R. M. Martin, L. J. Wright, Fred C. J. Witt, F. A. McIvor, Mrs. Katherine Bieker, Mrs. F. M. Burr, Laura Lynam Rawson, Alice J. Turtle, and James Foster. A history of Sheridan county, as depicted in a pageant given at Hoxie, August 22, was published in the Sentinel, starting August 28.

Sod houses in Kansas were discussed in an article entitled "Kansas Woman [Mrs. George Crofton] Proud of Her Sod House, Where She Has Resided 50 Years," printed in the Wichita Sunday Eagle, August 23, 1936.

Introduction of electric lights in Dodge City in 1886 was recalled in the Dodge City Daily Globe, August 25, 1936.

Residents of Liebenthal, oldest of the Kansas settlements founded by emigrants from the lower Volga district of Russia, celebrated the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of their town, September 1, 1936. The history of the settlement was briefly reviewed in the Hays Daily News, August 31, and the La Crosse Chieftain, September 3.

Judge R. M. Pickler, Herbert L. Fryback, Walt W. Mills, W. C. Wolfe, Henry A. Clark, Frank W. Simmonds, W. H. Ransom, A. W. Relihan, L. C. Uhl, and A. C. Coolidge were among the contributors writing in the sixty-fifth anniversary edition of the Smith County Pioneer, of Smith Center, issued September 3, 1936.

Names of northeast Kansas old settlers registering at the Hiawatha fair, September 3, 1936, were printed in the Hiawatha Daily World, September 4.

"A Few of the Historic Early Churches of Kansas Stand Today as Landmarks," the Kansas City (Mo.) Star reported in a feature article published September 4, 1936.

The sixty-fifth anniversary of the Swedesburg Lutheran Church of Clay Center, which was organized September 4, 1871, was celebrated September 4, 5, and 6, 1936. Histories of the church appeared in Clay Center newspapers contemporaneous with the event.

426 THE KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

An attractive pamphlet featuring the history of the Farmers State Bank of Lindsborg, which was chartered on September 4, 1886, was recently printed by the Bethany Printing Co., of Lindsborg. The historical sketch, prepared by J. O. Stromquist, was supplemented with biographies of men who were prominently identified with the organization and development of the bank.

The history of the Kansas department of the American Legion was briefly reviewed in the Wichita Sunday Eagle, September 6, 1936.

Gaylord celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of its incorporation on September 7, 1936. Historical sketches of the community were published in several issues of Smith Center newspapers.

The history of Olmütz, Barton county, was outlined by Rudy Mauler in the Hoisington Dispatch, September 10, 1936.

Argonia Argosy history was briefly reviewed in its issue of September 10, 1936. The newspaper was founded in October, 1913.

Recollections of J. L. Hodges, pioneer Kansas railroad man, were printed in the Pratt Daily Tribune, September 10, 1936. Mr. Hodges operated a short-line railroad from Liberal to Woods a few years ago.

The history of Rose school, District No. 27 of Butler county, was sketched in the Augusta Daily Gazette, September 11, 1936. The district was organized March 14, 1871.

A brief history of the Topeka chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, was reviewed in the Topeka Daily Capital, September 13, 1936. The chapter, which is reputed to be the oldest in Kansas. was organized January 31, 1896.

The experiences of F. S. Kirk, of Wichita, during the opening of the Cherokee outlet in 1893 were recorded by Victor Murdock in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, September 16, 1936. The article was headlined "At Opening of the Strip Forty-three Years Ago Today Horse Better Than Engine." Other articles recalling the historic event were published in the Arkansas City Daily Traveler and the Winfield Daily Courier of the same date.

"Battle of the Arickaree, Sept. 17, 1868, Ended an Indian Menace in Kansas," Paul I. Wellman reported in a Kansas City (Mo.) Star historical feature article appearing September 17, 1936.

KANSAS HISTORY IN THE PRESS 427

A letter written by Donald Campbell, August 28, 1860, describing the journey of his party through Iowa and Nebraska on its way to make homes near Emporia was published in the Emporia Gazette, September 18, 1936. The letter is the property of Mrs. S. H. Bennett of Peabody, greatgranddaughter of the writer.

The Syracuse Methodist Episcopal Church observed its fiftieth anniversary with special services held September 20, 1936. The church's history was reviewed in the Syracuse Journal, September 18.

Garden City's Daily Telegrams celebrated the installation of Associated Press leased wire service in its plant with the issuance of a special section, September 22, 1936, featuring the city's newspaper history.

Thayer Methodist Church history was briefly sketched in the Thayer News, September 24, 1936. A new church building was dedicated by the congregation with services held September 27.

Pratt county's old settlers registering at their annual picnic held in Pratt, September 24, 1936, were named in the Pratt Tribune, September 25, and the Union, October 1.

The history of Ebenezer Methodist Church, Highland township, Clay county, was outlined in articles published in the Clay Center Economist, September 30, 1936, and The Times, October 1. The church observed its sixtieth anniversary February 12 and the event was celebrated on September 27.

Excerpts from the correspondence of the Rt. Rev. John Baptist Miège, S. J., first Vicar-Apostolic of the Indian Territory east of the Rocky Mountains, to his brother in France, were printed in Mid-America, Chicago, in its .issue of October, 1936. The article, bearing the title "An Early Episcopal Visitation of Colorado: 1860," was edited by Thomas F. O'Connor and was translated from J. C. Garin's Notices Biographiques sur Mgr. J. B. Miège Premier, Apostolique du Kansas (Moutiers, 1886).

Articles relating to Kansas history appearing in current issues of the Pony Express Courier, of Placerville, Cal., include: "When Dodge City Was Wild and Woolly," by E. A. Brininstool, and "The Wind Wagon," by George J. Remsburg, in the October, 1936, issue; "Graves Along the Oregon Trail," by John G. Ellenbecker, in the November number.

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"Early Days in Western Kansas" was the title of an article by J. G. Felts which was published in the Logan County News, of Winona, in its issues of October 1, 8, and 15, 1936. The history of the News was also reviewed by Mr. Felts in the October 1 issue.

"Getting the Railroads Into City of Wichita Stirred Up Emotions," Victor Murdock reported in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, October 2, 1936. They were "carefully shuffled to the edge of the town and all ended up in the center of things."

Kansas history and industry were on parade at the Kansas Diamond Jubilee celebration, held in Wichita, October 7 to 17, 1936. Special "Diamond Jubilee" editions heralding the approaching exposition were issued by the Wichita Sunday Eagle and Sunday Beacon, October 4.

"Independence, Kan., Boasts Long List of Famous Persons," the Kansas City (Mo.) Star reported in a two-column article published October 8, 1936.

The history of the Strassburg community and its German Baptist Church was reviewed by Mrs. Jane Rupp in the Marion Record, October 8; 1936.

Horton celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the city and the Rock Island Railroad Shops with a "Golden Jubilee Pageant," held October 12 to 15, 1936. Newspapers of the city issued anniversary numbers during the month, The Tri-County News on October 12 and the Headlight on October 29, the latter publication also observing its own golden anniversary. Stressed in both editions were histories of the city, railroad, churches, lodges, schools, and business houses. Photographs, biographies and reminiscences of pioneers, reprints from early Horton newspapers, congratulatory letters, and names of old settlers were also featured. The News, which contained 48 full-sized pages, published brief histories of the city's newspapers, political parties, clubs, patriotic organizations, hospital, early-day bands, electric light and water plants. Titles of several feature articles included: "Rock Island Building Through Northeast Kansas in 1886 Fathers the City of Horton," by F. J. Nevins; "Fire Fighting Equipment Has Improved Much in 30 Years . . . ," by Dr. Clyde Gray; "Famous Old Kickapoo Indian School Once Occupied Ground That Is Included in 'Horton Heights' District"; "H. C. Miller Horton's First Postmaster ," by Bertha Coffland; "Captain J. R. Thompson Tells About the Soldiers of Horton"; "Chief Kennekuk, One of the Most

KANSAS HISTORY IN THE PRESS 429

Famous of the Kickapoo Chieftains, a Unique Character in Northeast Kansas History," by George A. Root; "Horton High-school Graduates Down Through the Years." The historical supplement to the Headlight was issued in magazine form and contained 116 pages. Among other stories featured by the Headlight were a brief review of the Pony Express by W. R. Honnell; "A History of Muscotah," by Mrs. Ralph Ellson; "Fort Leavenworth Military Road," by George A. Root; "A Sketch of Our Kickapoo Neighbors," by George J. Remsburg, and "Some New Malden Memories," by G. W. Carpenter.

Solomon City's lodge, No. 105, A.F.& A.M., celebrated the sixty-fifth anniversary of its organization, October 19, 1936. A history of the lodge was briefly outlined in the Solomon Tribune, October 15.

Macksville observed the fiftieth anniversary of its founding with a celebration held on October 23, 1936. The Macksville Enterprise issued a special edition, October 15, featuring histories of the city and its schools, post office, newspapers, churches and business houses. Included among the historical stories were: "And Macksville Is Fifty Years Old," by J. C. Hinshaw, and "Early Experiences in Stafford County," by Mrs. C. A. Satterlee. Brief biographical sketches of pioneers were printed in this and the succeeding issue. On November 5, Mrs. John Lill's reminiscences of Cassoday were published.

Wichita's boom was recalled in a series of fifteen short articles featured on the front page of the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, starting October 16, 1936. The articles, contributed by Ralph Richards of Fort Scott, were labeled "Wichita As I Knew It."

Histories of the Washington Methodist Episcopal Church were printed in The Washington County Register, October 16, 1936, and the Washington County News, October 22. The church celebrated the seventy-fifth anniversary of its origin during the week beginning October 18. "Short Sketches of Kansas History" is the title of a new Register feature beginning with the October 16 issue.

Oakley's school history was sketched in the Oakley Graphic, October 23, 1936.

A two-column biography of Cyrus K. Holliday, one of Topeka's founders and promoter of the Santa Fe railroad, was published in the Kansas City (Mo.) Star, November 5, 1936.

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Parkerville's history, as recounted by Mrs. Frank F. Prescott, was printed in the White City Register, November 5, 1936. The paper was read at the annual Pioneer Kansan picnic held in Wilsey, October 22.

A history of Wichita's school system was briefly sketched in the Wichita Sunday Eagle, November 8, 1936.

Osage City's Methodist Episcopal Church held its sixty-sixth anniversary homecoming, November 8, 1936. A history of the church was outlined in The Journal-Free Press, November 11.

Histories of Quinter and the Quinter Church of the Brethren were reviewed in The Gove County Advocate, of Quinter, November 12, 1936. The church commemorated its founding on August 14, 1886, with special services held November 14 and 15, 1936.

The history of The Kiowa County Signal, of Greensburg, formerly The Progressive-Signal, was sketched by A. W. Gibson in the Signal of November 12, 1936.

A two-column "Community History of Arrington," by J. M. Miller, appeared in The Tri-County News, of Horton, November 12, 1936.

Oatville's history was briefly recounted in the Wichita (Evening) Eagle, November 13, 1936.

Short introductory sketches of members of Topeka's artist group were printed in the Topeka State Journal, November 13 and 14, 1936.