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Kansas Historical Quarterly - Notes - February 1944

(Vol. 13, No. 1), pages 110 to 112.

Transcribed by lhn;
digitized with permission of the Kansas Historical Society.


At special ceremonies on October 28, 1943, a stone was dedicated commemorating the immigration of the Kotosufka Mennonite congregation from Russia to Kansas. The stone, approximately three feet wide and nine feet high, stands four miles west of Moundridge near where the Santa Fe railroad erected the immigrant house in 1874. The marker reads:

IN MEMORY OF THE SWISS MENNONITE CONGREGATION OF KOTOSUFKA, VOLHYNIA, RUSSIA, WHOSE MEMBERS LEFT RUSSIA IN SEARCH OF RELIGIOUS LIBERTY, SIXTY-TWO FAMILIES SAILING ON THE "CITY OF RICHMOND." LANDING IN NEW YORK SEPTEMBER 3, 1874, AND IN OCTOBER ARRIVING ON THIS QUARTER SECTION (S. W. QUARTER SEC. 19-21-2W) WHICH WAS DONATED BY THE SANTA FE. RAILROAD COMPANY FOR CHURCH PURPOSES, AND WITH A FEW MORE FAMILIES ARRIVING LATER, SETTLED THIS NEIGHBORHOOD; AND IN GRATITUDE TO THEM AND TO OUR BELOVED COUNTRY, THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. WHICH GRACIOUSLY GRANTED THE RELIGIOUS LIBERTY SOUGHT; AND TO OUR HEAVENLY FATHER TO WHOM WE GIVE ALL THE HONOR; THEIR DESCENDANTS ERECTED THIS MONUMENT, OCTOBER, 1943

[and on the opposite side]

NAMES OF THE IMMIGRANT FAMILIES
ALBRECHT, DIRKS, FLICKNER, GOERING, GRABER, KAUFMAN, KREHBIEL, NACHTIGAL, SCHRAG, SCHROEDER, SCHWARTZ, STRAUSZ, STUCKY, SUTTER, VORAN, WALTNER, WEDEL, ZERGER.

The story of the colony was briefly reviewed in dedication notes printed in the Mennonite Weekly Review, of Newton, October 21, November 4 and 11.

All officers of the Lyon county chapter of the Kansas Historical Society were reelected at its annual membership meeting in the chapter's museum at Emporia December 11, 1943. The offIcers are George R. R. Pflaum, president; Mrs. Robert L. Jones, first vice-president; John A. Roberts, second vice-president; E. C. Ryan, secretary; John S. Langley, treasurer; Mrs. Fanny Randolph Vickrey, Mrs. F. L. Gilson and Miss Lucina Jones, historians. Elected for three-year terms as directors were: C. A. Paine, Ivy township; Robert D. Lumley, Fremont township; Mrs. J. C. McKinney, Jackson township; Miss Kate Langley, Center township, and Mrs. Alice Evans Snyder, Third ward, Emporia. The chapter now has 117 life members, 120 annual members, and three honorary members.

(110)

Miss Stella B. Haines was reelected president of the Augusta Historical Society at the annual meeting held January 17, 1944. Other officers are Mrs. S. C. Webb, vice-president; Mrs. A. V. Small, secretary, and Miss May Clark, treasurer. Dean Earl K. Hillbrand of the University of Wichita was the featured speaker at the annual meeting of the Native Sons and Daughters of Kansas in Topeka January 28, 1944. His subject was: "To Kansas, to Make It Free!" Newly-elected officers of the Native Daughters are Mrs. F. W. Hawes, Russell, president; Mrs. W. H. von der Heiden, Newton, vice-president; Mrs. John C. Nelson, Topeka, secretary, and Mrs, C. I. Moyer, Severance, treasurer. Mrs. George L. McClenny, Topeka, was the retiring president. Officers of the Native Sons are Nyle H. Miller, Topeka, president; Frank Haucke, Council Grove, vice-president; Judge Homer Hoch, Topeka, secretary, and Col. Will Zurbucken, Topeka, treasurer. W. M. Richards, Emporia., was the retiring president. The organization's annual essay and oratorical contests were won by Dean Gregory of Osborne, and Norbert Dreiling of Hays, respectively.

At a meeting of the Riley County Historical Society in Manhattan February 5, 1944, Mrs. O. O. (Cora Kimble) Parker was elected president to succeed Charles W.Emmons who died January 26, and Mrs. Florence Fox Harrop was elected vice-president. Featured on the program were papers by Mrs. Harrop and Mrs. Clarence Johnson.

Newly-elected officers of the Kansas Commonwealth Club, of Wichita, are Herman Quinius, president; Bert A. Hedges, first vicepresident; Mrs. E. G. Cone, second vice-president; H. J. Quigley, third vice-president; Ralph Hinman, fourth vice-president; Mrs. Wallace E. Haines, recording secretary; Elsberry Martin, treasurer, and Ralph M. Cauthorn, executive secretary.

Wellington's museum, located under the National Bank of Commerce, is open for public inspection during regular banking hours. Pioneer relics of Wellington and vicinity, and displays from both World Wars are features of the collection. Because of the gasoline shortage and the pressure of war-related duties the plan to mark every mile of the Oregon trail through Kansas is proceeding slowly, according to John G. Ellenbecker of Marysville, president of the Kansas council of the American Pioneer Trails Association. The work is part of a general marking program spon-

112 KANSAS HISTORICAL QUARTERLY

sored by the Oregon council for the whole of the Oregon trail. Included among the Kansas county chairmen are H. C. Lathrop, Blue Rapids, Marshall county; Leo E. Dieker, Hanover, Washington county; George A. Root, Topeka, Shawnee county, and William E. Smith, Wamego, Pottawatomie county.

A twelve-page pamphlet entitled History of the First Presbyterian Church, Atchison, Kansas, by Dr. Charles Arthur Hawley, the minister, was published by the women's union of the church early in 1944. The church was started in 1858.

Methodism in Hays was reviewed in a twelve-page sixty-sixth anniversary booklet recently issued by the First Methodist Church of Hays. The first service was conducted by the Rev. Leonard Bell in a saloon in the latter part of 1873, but the church remained unorganized until 1878.

A study, "An Investigation of the Governmental Agencies of the State of Kansas," by Don E. Davis, has been published by the Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia as the twenty-seventh of the Studies in Education series. Mr. Davis lists eighty-five governmental agencies in Kansas. He tells how they were created, describes their organization, and briefly reviews their histories and duties.