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Museum After Hours

Join us for our special Museum After Hours program series, 6:30 p.m. Fridays.  The program is free. Admission to the museum is half-price from 5 to 6:30 p.m.; the Museum Store is also open until 6:30 p.m.

June 8, 2018 - "The Vietnam War with John Musgrave"

John Musgrave's stories and insights about the Vietnam War are illuminating and thought provoking. He joined the Marine Corps right after high school and served in Vietnam as part of a unit known as "the Walking Dead." He left Vietnam critically wounded eleven months after arriving. Following two years in the hospital he arrived home to a nation in turmoil over the war. Musgrave struggled through PTSD, became active in Vietnam Veterans Against the War, and found healing in the “combat” poetry he wrote. John Musgrave’s experience as a Marine in Vietnam, and his changing feelings about the war, were captured in the Ken Burns and Lynn Novick documentary The Vietnam War. John Musgrave with speak in a program moderated by Lindsey Foat from Kansas City Public Television.

July 13, 2018 - To Be Announced

August 10, 2018 - To Be Announced

September 14, 2018 - To Be Announced

October 12, 2018 - "Women at War"

Women have  a larger presence in America's military today than ever before, accounting for some 15 percent of all enlisted personnel. In 2016, they were cleared for every combat role from regular infantry to the Navy Seals and Army Delta units. Explore the historical context of women engaged in war, assessing the challenges and benefits of their integration and how it has influenced developments in military affairs. Presented by Dr. Janet Valentine from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.

November 9, 2018 - "The Doughboy's Life in Battle"

World War I caught a generation of American soldiers at a turning point in the nation’s history. At the moment of the Republic’s emergence as a key player on the world stage, these were the first Americans to endure mass machine warfare, and the first to come into close contact with foreign peoples and cultures in large numbers. What was it like to be one of these foot soldiers at the dawn of the American century? How did the doughboy experience the rigors of training and military life, interact with different cultures, and endure the shock and chaos of combat? Presented by Dr. Richard Faulkner from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.

December 14, 2018 - "Mr. Polk's War: War Experiences in the Mexico & the U.S., 1846-1848"

When he assumed office in 1845, James K. Polk was a man on a mission. His goal was territorial expansion or, as he put it in his inaugural address, the extension “of peace over additional territories and increasing millions.” President Polk vigorously pursued his territorial ambitions in the present-day American Southwest and Northwest, peacefully when he could, but through military means when necessary. As a result, Polk added more territory to the national domain than any other President. He also led the nation to victory in a war with Mexico from 1846-1848.Presented by Dr. Greg Hospdor from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.

January 11, 2019 - To Be Announced

February 8, 2019 - To Be Announced

March 8, 2019 - To Be Announced

April 12, 2019 - To Be Announced

May 10, 2019 - "The Naval War in Vietnam"

Explore the U.S. Navy’s operations in support of the conflict in Vietnam from the Gulf of Tonkin “incident” to the Navy’s role in the final frantic evacuation in 1975. Examination of the little known maritime operations such as “Market Time” and “Sealord” will highlight the advantages, not fully appreciated, that fighting in Vietnam gained by the U.S. having de facto command of the air and sea in the extensive coastal waters of the theater. Presented by Dr. John Kuehn from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.

June 14, 2019 - "The Forgotten Homefront"

Often called the “Forgotten War,” the Korean War was, in fact, the ignored war. It was ignored not because Americans did not care, but because they cared too much about the threat posed by Communism and the Soviet Union.  Examine the Korean War homefront in context of America’s fear of Soviet Communism and the possibility of nuclear annihilation. Presented by Dr. Janet Valentine from the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.