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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

The state of Kansas and Irish immigration

Butler, Thomas Ambrose

In this pamphlet, Irish Catholic priest Thomas Ambrose Butler describes his experience in Kansas as a pastor at the Catholic cathedral in Leavenworth. Butler provides advice to people in Ireland who are thinking of immigrating to the United States.

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John W. Robinson to Hiram Hill

Robinson, John W

John Robinson, President and Agent of the Manhattan Town Association, wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Robinson responded to Hill's interest in investing in the town, describing the town's current situation, climate, and development rate. He provided specific and dramatic examples of increasing property values, and assured Hill that there would be no land speculation; he would only sell lots to those investors who were willing to build.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew was born in Pennsylvania, and his family moved first to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873, he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery. Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874, and returned to Illinois to marry Montgomery in June, 1876. The Bartholomews returned to Kansas in September, 1876, and lived on their farm on Bow Creek in Rooks County until 1929. They then moved south to Hays, Kansas, in Ellis County, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College until his death in 1934.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson?s role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown?s violent actions; while he deemed them ?reckless and hopeless,? he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown?s own religious beliefs and the violence of ?the slave power".

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874. He was born in Pennsylvania and his family moved to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873 he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery and returned to Illinois to marry her in June 1876. They returned to Kansas in September of 1876. The Bartholomews lived on their farm on Bow Creek until 1929 when they moved to Hays, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College. He died in 1934.

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing. Mrs. Griffing was visiting her family in New York for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. Griffing gave his wife instructions about which fruit seeds (plum, cherry, and peach) and cuttings (gooseberry and blackberry) to collect and transport back to Kansas Territory, and described his plan to purchase pine flooring in Leavenworth.

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German American farmers, Marion County, Kansas

This is a photograph of a group of German American farmers standing before a very large tractor and threshing machine in Marion County, Kansas. An American flag is suspended between the two machines.

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John E. Stewart reminiscence

Stewart, John E

This undated document, presumably written by John E. Stewart, relates the author's experiences in Kansas Territory. The reminiscence begins with a description of how he entered the territory and the manner in which he constructed a house. Then, intermixed with accounts of his agricultural efforts and other day-to-day activities, there are brief mentions of the political situation in the territory. The main focus of the document then turns to when Stewart was a member of the Wakarusa Liberty Guard, including a description of the murder of Charles Dow, the murder of Hoyt, the Branson rescue, and other encounters with border ruffians.

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