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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 17 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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George Cutter, Kansas experience

This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie and, like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians from Missouri. While Cutter was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account of it.

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S.H. Moore, reminiscences

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

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Nancy Landon Kassebaum

A portrait of Nancy Landon Kassebaum, United States Senator from Kansas, 1978-1997, and the daughter of Kansas Governor Alfred Mossiman Landon.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew was born in Pennsylvania, and his family moved first to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873, he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery. Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874, and returned to Illinois to marry Montgomery in June, 1876. The Bartholomews returned to Kansas in September, 1876, and lived on their farm on Bow Creek in Rooks County until 1929. They then moved south to Hays, Kansas, in Ellis County, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College until his death in 1934.

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John Brown to Mary Brown and family

Brown, John, 1800-1859

One week after arriving at his sons' settlement ("Brownville") near Osawatomie, Brown wrote the family back east that although most were sick when he first arrived, they "appear now to be mending." The trip across Missouri was without incident, except for problems with a sick horse and their "heavy load." Brown then wrote briefly of the Adairs, the "most uncomfortable situation" in which he found his children upon his arrival, and other things including prairie fires and finally the political situation in the territory. In fact, at this early date, John Brown "believe[d] Missouri is fast becoming discouraged about making Kansas a Slave State & think the prospect of its becoming Free is brightening every day."

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Charles A. Wright to Hiram Hill

Wright, Charles A.

Charles Wright writes from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill. Wright describes his recent experiences buying and selling cattle obtained from Missouri counties. He also mentions his purchase of town shares in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, and comments on the recent emigration rush, which was increasing demand for land, filling hotels, and causing rent to increase. Wright feels optimistic about the future of peace in Kansas, having heard a story about Governor Reeder's feeling for the same.

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Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917

This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

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James H. Holmes, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony of James Holmes is a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal stories recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Mr. Holmes had studied agricultural chemistry before entering Kansas Territory, and his initial reason for emigrating was his desire to undertake agricultural experiments. He had also intended to join with Clubbs Vegetarian Settlement, which was located on the Neosho River near the north line of the Osage Reserve. He goes into detail about the Neosho valley and its vegetation, mineral deposits, etc. The rest of his account deals with his involvement in the free state militia and his role in defending Osawatomie.

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