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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

New York Daily Tribune, "The Drouth and Famine in Kansas"

New York Daily Tribune

This newspaper article, published in the New York Daily Tribune from October 10, 1860, outlined the basic details of the suffering and destitution of settlers in Kansas. It also included reprints of two circulars originating from Kansas Territory. One was from the Presbytery of Highland, and the other was from the Central Relief Committee based in Leavenworth. The first reprinted circular provided information about the dire situation and gave the names of the members of this committee. The second circular requested that the elders and deacons of each church in Kansas ascertain how many families needed immediate assistance in order to present a full report to the Central Relief Committee.

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Thaddeus Hyatt to James Buchanan

Hyatt, Thaddeus

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to the President of the United States in an effort to obtain assistance for the suffering inhabitants of Kansas. He described in detail the needs of the settlers, including their lack of adequate winter clothing and the scarcity of food. According to his personal observations, Hyatt concluded that the only options left to Kansas settlers were exodus or starvation. He also asked that all government lands be removed from the market, especially those in the New York Indian reserve.

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Report of a Trip to Kansas

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

William F. M. Arny was the general agent of the National Kansas Committee. This report describes the "wants and sufferings" of settlers in Kansas Territory. It includes references to border ruffians, land sales, and the suffering in various districts of Kansas. He requests that aid be sent to the Kansas Central Committee.

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Thaddeus Hyatt to Amos Adams Lawrence

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This letter was written from New York by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. He was writing to Amos Lawrence about the committee's efforts to relieve the suffering of free state settlers in Kansas Territory. Apparently, a shipment of clothing to Kansas contained a number of articles that were well worn and of little use. Hyatt also spoke of the need for agricultural implements, cattle, and seeds to end the suffering of the settlers.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

This letter was written by S. C. Pomeroy of the Kansas Relief Committee, one of several aid committees that had been formed to ease the suffering of settlers in Kansas. This particular committee specifically sought to send relief funds and provisions into Kansas during the drought of 1860. The letter is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, keeping him informed about the efforts to distribute food and clothing. Pomeroy appreciated the help he had received from Hyatt, but he was disappointed in Dr. Webb. The last page of the letter has been crossed out and edited.

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S. Chamberlin to Thaddeus Hyatt

Chamberlin, S.

This letter, written by S. Chamberlin, President of the LeRoy Kansas Aid Society, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee. This aid society in LeRoy, New York, was formed after a lecture presented by H.D. Northrup, an agent of the National Kansas Committee. The author immensely praised the speaking abilities of Northrup, likening him to the great orator Henry Clay. Chamberlin was firmly convinced that, if Northrup canvassed the North, he would be able to stir the hearts of Northerners in support of free state cause. This society also collected clothing and money to send to the free state settlers in Kansas.

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Edmund Burke Whitman to National Kansas Committee, expense sheet

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

This expense sheet, which was in account with E. B. Whitman, an agent of the committee, lists expenses and supplies sent to aid the free state inhabitants of Kansas. The items sent include (among others) wheat, oats, corn, beans, potatoes, garden seeds, bedding, and clothing.

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List of clothing articles

Bourne, S.

This is a detailed list of the articles of clothing sent to Kansas by the First Congregational Church in Flushing, New York. It includes dresses, frocks, coats, skirts, pants, drawers, shirts, socks, vests, boots and gloves as well as other items. The pastor of the church, S. Bourne, emphasized the quality and durability of the clothing.

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Richard Josiah Hinton to National Kansas Committee

Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901

R. J. Hinton wrote this letter from Lawrence to the members of the National Kansas Committee, offering his suggestions about how to sustain the struggling settlers of Kansas. He proposed the idea of bringing the manufacturing industry into the territory as a source of employment. He also mentioned that a flour mill would be greatly appreciated by Kansans.

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William Frederick Milton Arny to Thaddeus Hyatt

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

W. F. M. Arny, an agent of the National Kansas Committee, wrote this letter to Thaddeus Hyatt while traveling on the Missouri River. The main focus of this letter revolved around committee business and the state of affairs in Kansas. During this visit to Kansas, Arny had reorganized the Kansas Central Committee in order to increase its efficiency, and he included in this letter a revised list of its officers and members. He also wrote about his conversation with Governor Geary concerning the various volunteer companies created by free state men. The letter ends with a brief description of the suffering of the settlers, their meager diet, and their desperate need for more provisions.

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