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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 29 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Rachel Garrison to Samuel Adair

Garrison, Rachel A.

Rachel Garrison wrote to her cousin, Samuel Adair, that she had a little daughter two months old, which meant she was pregnant when her husband, David Garrison, was killed in the Battle of Osawatomie in August, 1856, and when she returned to Yellow Springs, Ohio. She also mentioned her other daughter, Jania. She hoped Adair could hold on to the claim the Garrisons pre-empted until it could be entered at the land office. She also listed items she would like Adair to sell for her. The same letter also contained correspondence from James Garrison.

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Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing to James Griffing

Griffing, Jemima August (Goodrich)

J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing wrote from Hartford, Connecticut, to her husband, James Griffing, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Mrs. Griffing was visiting family and friends in the East for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. She reported on her trip from Owego, New York, to Hartford, and her decision to leave their young son, Johnny, in the care of Mr. Griffing's family in Owego. She described Johnny's behavior in some detail, and informed Mr. Griffing that she planned to start her trip back to Kansas Territory in October, 1859.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Resolution of the Boston Preacher's Meeting

This resolution, "unanimously adopted" by the members of the Boston Preacher's Meeting, approved the establishment of Blue Mont Central College near Manhattan, Kansas Territory, by Reverend Joseph Denison, an "old friend" of the Boston Preachers. Denison had emigrated to K.T. following Isaac Goodnow, and was working with him to obtain support for the college.

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George Cutter, Kansas experience

This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie and, like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians from Missouri. While Cutter was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account of it.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Boston, Massachusetts, requesting that Hill send the $500 he pledged to invest in a church in Kansas Territory. Simpson indicated that he needed to quickly raise $5-8,000, and could not return to the Territory without it.

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William Allen White

This is a photo of William Allen White's family at their cabin in Colorado. Son William Lindsay and daughter Mary Katherine are sitting on a horse with their mother, Sallie, standing next to them. As publisher and editor of the Emporia Gazette, White gained national fame with his editorial "What's the Matter with Kansas?" during the Populist era in the 1890s.

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