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Page 1 of 1, showing 3 records out of 3 total, starting on record 1, ending on 3

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Oscar Dayton to Orville Chester Brown

Dayton, Oscar V

This letter, written by Oscar Dayton from the Banking Office of Dayton and Co., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, was addressed to Orville C. Brown, a founder of Osawatomie. The main subject of the letter was a printing press and other pertinent materials that were available to the residents of Osawatomie, if they in turn paid Dayton's debts and granted him deeds for town lots in Osawatomie. That was Dayton's preferred method of payment. Furthermore, Dayton informed Brown that there were other men who were interested in purchasing the printing press, so he needed a speedy reply to this letter. It concluded with personal regards to Mr. Brown's family.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.

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Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.

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