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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Holt, O.W.

This panoramic view shows civilian workers awaiting their pay at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as approximately 15,000 carpenters built buildings in city block squares. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.

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Souvenir folder of Camp Funston, Kansas, and the workman who built it

Bloom, Moses

This souvenir folder on Camp Funston includes a color photo of home of Major General Woods; a panoramic view of the camp on the Ft. Riley military reservation near Junction City, Kansas; a view of some of the troops, the first territorial capitol of Kansas; troops on a pontoon bridge; mounted troops; a panoramic photograph of the the civilian workers who built the camp; and the Union Pacific railroad station at Camp Funston. There is also a listing of the accomplishments of the first six months of the war. The facility, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as approximately 15,000 carpenters built buildings in city block squares. The number of buildings estimated to have been erected at the camp were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89 Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site and dismantled the buildings.

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Charles Wolcott Smith

This photograph shows a formal portrait of Charles Wolcott Smith, (1831-1907). Smith a native of Portage County, Ohio, migrated to Lawrence, Kansas in 1854 from Lowell, Massachusetts as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. A carpenter by trade, Smith was fortunate to escape from danger during Quantrill's Raid, on August 21, 1863, as he worked on a building west of town. When he received word of the raid, Smith immediately came to the rescue to build wooden boxes for the dead. On July 30, 1907, Smith died at the age of seventy-five at the home of his daughter Allie Homestead in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Charles Wolcott Smith

This photograph shows a formal portrait of Charles Wolcott Smith, (1831-1907). Smith a native of Portage County, Ohio, migrated to Lawrence, Kansas in 1854 from Lowell, Massachusetts as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. A carpenter by trade, Smith was fortunate to escape from danger during Quantrill's Raid on August 21, 1863, as he was working on a building west of town. When he received word of the raid, Smith immediately came to the rescue to build wooden boxes for the deceased. On July 30, 1907, Smith died at the age of seventy-five at the home of his daughter Allie Omstead in Lawrence, Kansas.

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