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Page 1 of 190, showing 10 records out of 1893 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Wesley Carter to George L. Stearns

Carter, John Wesley, 1840-1929

Letter from John Wesley Carter in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts to George L. Stearns. The letter concerns the delivery of revolvers that were requested by Capt. Brown in previous correspondence. The revolvers were sold at a discount to Brown, who most likely used the arms to defend the Free State cause. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

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John Wesley Carter to George L. Stearns

Carter, John Wesley, 1840-1929

John Wesley Carter of Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, wrote to George Stearns regarding a receipt of purchase for revolvers that were requested by Captain John Brown. Carter asked for contact information for John Brown since his previous attempts at contact had failed. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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George L. Stearns and James Montgomery correspondence

Montgomery, James, 1814-1871

A letter from George L. Stearns to James Montgomery and Montgomery's responding letter. Stearns writes about the threat of battle coming to Kansas and Montgomery responds that the Confederacy is trying to win over Indians to fight for them.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 7, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

Correspondence sent from the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri. The Superintendents of Indian Affairs during this period were Joshua Pilcher, David D. Mitchell, and Thomas H. Harvey. Their correspondence with Indian agents and sub-agencies concerned the disbursement of allotments and annuities, the settling of expenses and treaty stipulations, and the nominations of blacksmiths, interpreters, and farmers for several tribes. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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John Wesley Carter to George L. Stearns

Carter, John Wesley, 1840-1929

John Wesley Carter of Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, wrote George L. Stearns regarding the shipment of arms to Captain John Brown, who had requested the firearms in previous correspondence. Carter asked for confirmation of the delivery address and stated that he would ship them as soon as he received word from Stearns. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 8, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

Correspondence received by the Central Superintendency at St. Louis, Missouri. The majority of this correspondence is sent from Indian agents, including John Dougherty, Anthony L. Davis, Congreve Jackson, Richard W. Cummins, Stephen Cooper and Joseph V. Hamilton, to the Superintendents of Indian Affairs, including George Maguire, Joshua Pilcher, and David D. Mitchell. Topics discussed include nominations for tribal blacksmiths, reports of alcohol abuse, annuities from the federal government, and funds needed to uphold provisions of various treaties, including the Treaty with the Delawares (1818) and the Treaty of Castor Hill (1832). A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains correspondence sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri from 1847-1855. The correspondence was sent by the Superintendents of Indian Affairs to the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. During this period the superintendents included Thomas H. Harvey, David D. Mitchell, and Alfred Cumming; the commissioners included William Medill, Orlando Brown, Luke Lea, and George Washington Manypenny. Topics of discussion focused on the appropriation of federal funds for treaties, the hiring and firing of Indian agents, and the transportation and storage of goods and supplies. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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Eisenhower political button

this large red, white, and blue button promoted the presidential campaign of Dwight D. Eisenhower. Originally from Abilene, Kansas, Eisenhower was the Supreme Allied Commander during World War II and later the 34th President of the United States. The phrase "I like Ike" was a clever play on Eisenhower's name and proved popular during his 1952 campaign. Eisenhower grew up in Abilene, Kansas.

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