Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Military (Remove)
Objects and Artifacts (Remove)
Date -- 1890s (Remove)
Places -- Cities and towns (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
Collections -- Photograph (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Government and Politics -- State Government (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

previewthumb

John Lewis Waller

Martin, H. T.

This sepia colored cabinet card shows John Lewis Waller, 1850-1907. Born into slavery, Waller overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished lawyer, journalist, politician and diplomat. He migrated to Kansas in the spring of 1878, after hearing of Pap Singleton's efforts to colonize Blacks in the state.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Dowing, George

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but McAfee's duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and he even gave up his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's Forty-Second District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Bliss & Wentworth

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871 McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected ,to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

This black and white photograph shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee's County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Gardner, R.G.

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865 to 1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee county's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb

John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

previewthumb

William Eugene Stanley

This sepia colored photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, (front row wearing a dark suit), during military maneuvers for the Kansas National Guard in Ft. Riley, Kansas. Stanley entered public office in 1871. In 1898, he is elected as the fifteenth governor of Kansas, a position he holds until 1903. Afterwards, he returns to Wichita, Kansas to practice law.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|