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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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United States Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency, St. Louis, Missouri. Volume 9, Correspondence

United States. Office of Indian Affairs. Central Superintendency

This volume contains correspondence sent by the Office of Indian Affairs, Central Superintendency in St. Louis, Missouri from 1847-1855. The correspondence was sent by the Superintendents of Indian Affairs to the Commissioners of Indian Affairs. During this period the superintendents included Thomas H. Harvey, David D. Mitchell, and Alfred Cumming; the commissioners included William Medill, Orlando Brown, Luke Lea, and George Washington Manypenny. Topics of discussion focused on the appropriation of federal funds for treaties, the hiring and firing of Indian agents, and the transportation and storage of goods and supplies. Partial funding for the digitization of these records was provided by the National Park Service. A searchable, full-text (PDF) transcription is available under "External Links" below.

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Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This correspondence was sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Hiram T. Benam served as Adjutant General from 1876-1878 and Peter S. Noble served from 1878-1883. It includes inquiries made from men "anxious for organization" hoping to enlist militias in the towns of Parsons, Independence, Iuka, Lawrence, and Hutchinson. The collection also includes bill of ladings from the Kansas Pacific Railway and Rock Island (Illinois) Arsenal. Frequent correspondence was exchanged with Willis Brown, cashier for the State Bank of Kansas in Seneca, Kansas, Scott Hopkins of the Kansas University Cadets, John T. Bradley, a lawyer from Council Grove and member of the Kansas Senate from 1876 to 1880, F.C. Merrill, a lumber dealer from Paola, and E.D. Rose, a hardware dealer from Holton.

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After the great war is over

This promotional brochure argues that the construction of good roads in the United States will enhance agricultural productivity and economic development in the aftermath of World War I.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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Harry Walter Colmery with his wife Minerva and children

Harry W. Colmery, his wife Minerva (Mina), and their children Harry Jr., Mary, and Sarah are standing by a car.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a ?disgrace to Kansas.? William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the ?rebel? troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding economic conditions in town. Chadwick asked that Hill promptly pay his debt to Abelard Guthrie, a fellow Quindaro investor, who was on the brink of bankruptcy. He added that Clinton County, Missouri, had voted not to invest in the Parkville and Grand River Railroad that fall, which had damaged the possibility for a boom in economic activity for the coming fall. Chadwick reported that heavy rains had hindered transportation on local rivers, but was optimistic that October might bring some money to the town through land sales. No news had been heard from Causin, the Washington attorney who was assisting Hill to retain some disputed lands.

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James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

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