Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Military (Remove)
Date -- 1900s (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 22 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

previewthumb

James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

previewthumb

Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

previewthumb

Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

previewthumb

Richard Josiah Hinton

A pencil drawing of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory in June of 1856 to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individuals' views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

previewthumb

Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

previewthumb

Dwight David Eisenhower camping with a group of boys.

Dwight David Eisenhower is camping with a group of boys near Abilene, Kansas, in this photograph.

previewthumb

Richard Josiah Hinton

A black and white photo of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freeman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

previewthumb

Richard Josiah Hinton

A sepia colored portrait of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1865, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

previewthumb

Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Martin, H. T.

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Military

Date -- 1900s

Government and Politics

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Home and Family

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material