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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Medical history of the 19th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry Volunteers

Bailey, Mahlon

Mahlon Bailey, the regimental surgeon, recorded this medical history of the 19th Kansas Cavalry. This history includes information on the hasty physicals given to new recruits, wounds received in battle, and other medical problems encountered on the trail, as well as general information about the day-to-day activities of the soldiers. Located at the end of the report is a chart detailing the medical problems of the regiment, including the number of cases of dysentery, gonorrhea, pneumonia, ulcers, burns, and sprains (among many others). At the end of these charts, Bailey expresses his appreciation to the commanders of the regiment, thanking them for following his medical advice and showing concern for the health of their soldiers.

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William Allen White

This is a photograph of Emporia Gazette editor, William Allen White, dressed in a military uniform during World War I. White writes in his autobiography of he and his friend Henry Allen going to France on behalf of the Red Cross during WWI, and buying, dressing,and being photographed in these uniforms.

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William C. Menninger, M.D., in Army uniform

William Menninger, M.D, photographed during his Army career in World War II. William and his father, Dr. C.F. Menninger and his brother Karl, established the Menninger Clinic, in Topeka, Kansas. William was instrumental in establishing the Menninger School of Psychiatry in Topeka to care for the veterans of WWII. He is known as one of the key influences in the development of a psychiatric guide which later became known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

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Eula Gentzler papers

Gentzler, Eula (Eula A.), 1910-1992

This collection consists of letters written by Eula Gentzler to her parents in Topeka, Kansas, and official military correspondence as a U.S. Army nurse. Miss Gentzler referred to hospital ship activities, places she visited, and family references. Occasionally Eula expressed her thoughts on the war. Eula A. Gentzler was born November 10, 1910, in Belleville, Kansas. Her father Ernest T. Gentzler was a fireman for the Union Pacific Railroad. The family moved to Topeka when Eula was, approximately, thirteen years old. She graduated from Topeka High School and, later, the Asbury Hospital School of Nursing in Salina, Kansas, in 1937. She enlisted in the U. S. Army Nurse Corps in October, 1942. She was discharged in Octorber, 1945, but was recalled during the Korean conflict serving from 1951 to 1957. Miss Gentzler was sent to Europe in the fall of 1943. She was assigned to duty on the hospital ships Shamrock and Arcadia, working in surgery as well as the wards. Both carried approximately 800 patients. The ships carried injured servicemen from North Africa and Europe to the U. S., requiring six weeks to make a trip across, pick up a load of patients, and return. When in the war zone, they would get patients during battles and would then work extended shifts. Miss Gentzler recalled that during the battle at Enzio, they started surgery at 1 p.m. and operated until 5 a.m. the next morning. On another occasion, they picked up a load of British sailors whose mine sweeper had been bombed and the hospital crew worked all night until they ran out of supplies. Eula Gentzler died on April 13, 1992.

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History of the 19th Kansas Cavalry--Indian War of 1868-69

Jenness, George B.

This history of the 19th Kansas, written by the commander of Company F, George B. Jenness, is mainly composed of extracts from his diary. It includes details about where each company was raised, the names of the officers, organization and implementation of orders, the rigors of army life, and troop movements. Jenness' history also includes information about Samuel J. Crawford, the governor of Kansas, who resigned his position to assume command of the regiment on November 5, 1868. The document contains a copy of a letter from General Philip H. Sheridan to Governor Crawford about the need for calling up troops. Information on Native Americans, including interactions between troops and Native Americans, is also contained within this item. Jenness mentions captive chief including Satanta.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from the "Camp of Grant's Army near Grand Junction Tenn.," was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber described camp life and mentioned the possibility that the troops would return to Kansas. He also discussed the contrast between "the pomp and circumstance of war" and the "blind bull-dog fight" he witnessed at the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. The last portion of his letter deals with issues such as clothing, Thanksgiving, and other political issues.

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9th Svc. Co. Telephont Gang, Hawaii

Hughes, James Clark, 1888-1964

This photo was taken June 22, 1921. It shows men gathered around a truck probably on Schofield Barracks. These men were part of the 9th Service Company Telephone gang. After Captain Hughes' assignment at Motor Transport School, Camp Holabird, Maryland, he had applied for a position in the Regular Army. He was accepted in September 1920 and assigned to a post at Ft. Lewis, Washington as a Battery Commander of the 13th Field Artillery. In October he was transferred to the Battery Commander Headquarters for the 13th Field Artillery at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Hughes and wife, Mabel, along with the children moved to Hawaii and remained there until September of 1923. A full biography of James Clark Hughes is available at the link below to Kansapedia.

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Fort Scott soldiers

This photograph of two men on horses at Fort Scott was probably taken between 1863 and 1865. The man in the foreground is Corporal George Henry McCoon, company saddler in the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry. The photograph shows the Fort Scott stables in the background. Corporal McCoon married in Fort Scott shortly after the Civil War, then relocated to Oregon and later to California.

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