Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Military -- Facilities (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 33 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Fort Scott soldiers

This photograph of two men on horses at Fort Scott was probably taken between 1863 and 1865. The man in the foreground is Corporal George Henry McCoon, company saddler in the 3rd Wisconsin Cavalry. The photograph shows the Fort Scott stables in the background. Corporal McCoon married in Fort Scott shortly after the Civil War, then relocated to Oregon and later to California. Patron supplied information suggests Ina Riley Wilson, a McCoon descendent, donated the original tintype to the Fort Scott Historical Society prior to 1979 from which KSHS obtained a copy.

previewthumb

Bennett C. Riley

This photograph shows a portrait of Bennett Riley that was probably commissioned by his family in the 1880s. Riley died June 9, 1853. The portrait has resided at the U.S. Cavalry Museum at Fort Riley, Kansas, since about 1903. Bennett Riley, after whom Fort Riley was named, had a long and prestigious career in the U. S. military. Born in Virginia in 1787, he entered the army in 1813. In 1829 he commanded the first military escort on the Santa Fe Trail. In that same year, he succeeded Colonel Henry Leavenworth as commander of Fort Leavenworth. In 1847 he became a brigadier general. He also served during the Mexican War and, in 1848, he served as the last territorial governor of California, where he helped create their state constitution.

previewthumb

George Cutter, Kansas experience

This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie and, like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians from Missouri. While Cutter was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account of it.

previewthumb

Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

In this letter, S. C. Pomeroy wrote from Atchison, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter revolved around the suffering of the settlers and their desperate search for provisions and employment. Pomeroy also mentioned the prospect of obtaining a large amount of buffalo meat, as well as the failed corn crop and the generally destitute condition of the settlers. He truly feared for the lives of the settlers during the upcoming winter.

previewthumb

Thomas Bickerton testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, taken down by Thaddeus Hyatt as part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, is divided into two parts. It begins with descriptions of his life before he came to Kansas Territory and his efforts to set up a claim outside of Lawrence, including his technique for building his sod house. Thomas Bickerton was a well traveled individual and an influential commander of a free state artillery company. He was involved in skirmishes with border ruffians and in the attack on Franklin. Also, General James Lane sent him to Kansas City to obtain a brass howitzer (later known as the Abbott howitzer) for use against the proslavery forces.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

previewthumb

Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Minutes of the Third Session

Methodist Episcopal Church. Kansas and Nebraska Conference

The annual conference was held in Topeka, Kansas Territory from April 15 through 19, 1858. The minutes included the names of those attending as well as the business conducted. It listed the various ministerial appointments in Kansas and Nebraska as well as the membership of the committees. The minutes reported on educational efforts at Baker University and Blue Mount Central College. It contained information on the church's stand on slavery and temperance. The constitution of the Kansas and Nebraska Conference Missionary Society was included in the report as were statistics for the various churches.

previewthumb

Eula Gentzler papers

Gentzler, Eula (Eula A.), 1910-1992

This collection consists of letters written by Eula Gentzler to her parents in Topeka, Kansas, and official military correspondence as a U.S. Army nurse. Miss Gentzler referred to hospital ship activities, places she visited, and family references. Occasionally Eula expressed her thoughts on the war. Eula A. Gentzler was born November 10, 1910, in Belleville, Kansas. Her father Ernest T. Gentzler was a fireman for the Union Pacific Railroad. The family moved to Topeka when Eula was, approximately, thirteen years old. She graduated from Topeka High School and, later, the Asbury Hospital School of Nursing in Salina, Kansas, in 1937. She enlisted in the U. S. Army Nurse Corps in October, 1942. She was discharged in Octorber, 1945, but was recalled during the Korean conflict serving from 1951 to 1957. Miss Gentzler was sent to Europe in the fall of 1943. She was assigned to duty on the hospital ships Shamrock and Arcadia, working in surgery as well as the wards. Both carried approximately 800 patients. The ships carried injured servicemen from North Africa and Europe to the U. S., requiring six weeks to make a trip across, pick up a load of patients, and return. When in the war zone, they would get patients during battles and would then work extended shifts. Miss Gentzler recalled that during the battle at Enzio, they started surgery at 1 p.m. and operated until 5 a.m. the next morning. On another occasion, they picked up a load of British sailors whose mine sweeper had been bombed and the hospital crew worked all night until they ran out of supplies. Eula Gentzler died on April 13, 1992.

previewthumb

Fort Leavenworth band, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas

View of an unidentified Fort Leavenworth band posed on the steps of a building in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

previewthumb

Fort Riley Band, Fort Riley, Kansas

One side of a stereograph showing members of the Fort Riley Band on the parade grounds at Fort Riley, Kansas. A credible source suggests this is the 16th Infantry Regimental Band stationed at Fort Riley from 1887-1880. Copies of originals donated by the George Smith Public Library in Junction City, Kansas,1975.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Military -- Facilities

Places

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Thematic Time Period

Transportation