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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 19 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Martin Anderson

This black and white photograph shows a painting of Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), from Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks on ,August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major on November 22, 1863 after the regiment was reassigned, in the summer of 1863, as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Martin Anderson

Brown's Photographic Gallery

This carte de visite shows Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), of Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks, on August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major, on November 22, 1863, after the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the summer of 1863. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Harry Hines Woodring

Photograph of Governor Harry Hines Woodring cooking on a wood stove on his farm near Lecompton, Douglas County.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Oscar Leopold Moore

Leonard, J. H.

This sepia colored photograph shows Oscar Leopold Moore, (1849-1929). Moore a native of West Virginia served with the Third West Virginia Cavalry Regiment of Company M. under the command of General George Custer. He was also one of the soldiers chosen to accompany General Ulysses S. Grant to Appomattox Court House for General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the war Moore attended classes at Mt. Union College in Ohio before migrating ,in 1874, to Enterprise, Kansas. For a few years he taught school in the Enterprise community until he passed the bar, in 1878, and began a long and successful career as a lawyer in Dickinson County. Moore practiced law in Solomon City for a short period of time before moving, in 1882, to Abilene, Kansas. In the former cow town, he devoted his time and energy to upholding the law and defending citizen's rights. Moore's trust and integrity as a lawyer preceded him. In 1896, he was appointed Judge of the Eighth Judicial District of the State of Kansas. He served on the bench for nearly thirteen years before stepping down in January of 1909. After leaving the bench, Moore was appointed court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court until failing health forced him to step down in 1929. On June 6, 1929 after a prolonged illness, Moore passed away at the age of eighty at his home in Abilene, Kansas.

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Kansas National Guardsman in the southeast Kansas coal fields

This photograph shows a Kansas National Guardsman in southeast Kansas during the coal strikes of 1919.

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Kansas National Guardsman at the southeast Kansas coal fields

This photograph shows a Kansas National Guardsman holding a rifle during the 1919 coal strikes in southeast Kansas.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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John Lewis Waller

Martin, H. T.

This sepia colored cabinet card shows John Lewis Waller, 1850-1907. Born into slavery, Waller overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished lawyer, journalist, politician and diplomat. He migrated to Kansas in the spring of 1878, after hearing of Pap Singleton's efforts to colonize Blacks in the state.

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