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Page 1 of 1, showing 5 records out of 5 total, starting on record 1, ending on 5

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

During a lull, Cyrus K. Holliday reported from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania that Colonel Edwin V. Sumner had forced proslavery troops back to Missouri and camped on the border. Two free state men from Wisconsin had killed proslavery supporters near Osawatomie. Governor Wilson Shannon had resigned. A "large mass convention" was planned for July 2nd and 3rd, with a meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th. Cyrus advised Mary and Mr. Nichols to wait until after the 4th to travel to the territory.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, who was presently touring Pennsylvania to speak in support of Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. Mary mentioned Mr. Howe, L. Lord, and Alfred Huidekoper, all friends of Cyrus. William D. Paul, who lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory had written. Quoting from his letter, Mary reported a skirmish between free state and proslavery men at Franklin, in Douglas County. Henry C. Titus, colonel of proslavery troops, and Israel B. Donalson, U. S. marshal, had been taken prisoner. Governor Wilson Shannon had negotiated a treaty. Mary also mentioned her ill health, and she hoped that Cyrus was well.

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Thomas John Wood

Portrait of Captain Thomas John Wood, U.S. Army, First Cavalry station at Fort Scott in 1858. Wood and a deputy U.S. Marshall arrested members of Colonel Harvey's free-state party after the Battle of Hickory Point. The captives were taken to Lecompton where they were imprisoned and charged with murder. About twenty of Harvey's soldiers were tried, convicted, and sentenced.

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