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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 33 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Charles D. Stough

This black and white photograph shows Charles D. Stough, (1914-1995). Born in Mound Valley, Kansas and a graduate from the University of Kansas Law School. He began his career practicing law in Chicago, Illinois and latter in Lawrence, Kansas before enlisting at the age of twenty-eight, in the U.S. Navy. After his honorable discharge, Stough made a successful bid in 1946 for a political office to the Kansas House of Representatives where he served four regular sessions as a Republican from the Eleventh District. He was also majority leader from 1951 to 1953 and speaker of the house from 1953 to 1954. Stough did not seek re-election in 1954, but continued to serve in a number of key political posts at the local, state and national levels. On December 8, 1995 just two days after observing his eighty-first birthday, Charles Stough passed away.

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George Henry Hoyt

A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Kansas Civil War Centennial correspondence

This collection consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence, news releases, addresses and remarks, logistical and planning materials, invitations and confirmations or declinations, copies of historic materials and other reference materials, and other such records related to the Kansas Civil War Centennial Commission, of which Alan W. Farley was member and chairman of this particular activity. The records specifically relate to the centennial celebrations held at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, re-enacting Kansas' entry into the United States and flag-raising as the 34th state in 1861. The documents are mostly arranged roughly in reverse chronological order and include correspondence with various militia units and patriotic organizations. Kansas was celebrating the centennial of statehood in 1961, also, so there is some communication with the Centennial Commission in this correspondence.

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John Brown to Thomas Russell

Brown, John, 1800-1859

From his jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, just days before he was to go on trial for treason, John Brown wrote seeking legal counsel for himself and fellow prisoners. Brown mentioned his wounds, but said they were "doing well," expresses special concern for "the young men prisoners," and closed "Do not send an ultra Abolitionist."

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Abraham Lincoln

A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding the land dispute between Hill and Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. Chadwick had been advised by Robert Lawrence (perhaps a local attorney) to correspond with a Nathaniel Pope Causin, Prosecutor of Indian Claims, in Washington. Chadwick, for Lawrence's support and assistance, had advised that Hill would pay him. Chadwick was to pass along Causin's card once he received it from Mr. Lawrence.

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