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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Martin Anderson

This black and white photograph shows a painting of Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), from Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks on ,August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major on November 22, 1863 after the regiment was reassigned, in the summer of 1863, as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Martin Anderson

Brown's Photographic Gallery

This carte de visite shows Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), of Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks, on August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major, on November 22, 1863, after the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the summer of 1863. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Charles D. Stough

This black and white photograph shows Charles D. Stough, (1914-1995). Born in Mound Valley, Kansas and a graduate from the University of Kansas Law School. He began his career practicing law in Chicago, Illinois and latter in Lawrence, Kansas before enlisting at the age of twenty-eight, in the U.S. Navy. After his honorable discharge, Stough made a successful bid in 1946 for a political office to the Kansas House of Representatives where he served four regular sessions as a Republican from the Eleventh District. He was also majority leader from 1951 to 1953 and speaker of the house from 1953 to 1954. Stough did not seek re-election in 1954, but continued to serve in a number of key political posts at the local, state and national levels. On December 8, 1995 just two days after observing his eighty-first birthday, Charles Stough passed away.

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Harry Hines Woodring

Photograph of Governor Harry Hines Woodring cooking on a wood stove on his farm near Lecompton, Douglas County.

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George Henry Hoyt

A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Oscar Leopold Moore

Leonard, J. H.

This sepia colored photograph shows Oscar Leopold Moore, (1849-1929). Moore a native of West Virginia served with the Third West Virginia Cavalry Regiment of Company M. under the command of General George Custer. He was also one of the soldiers chosen to accompany General Ulysses S. Grant to Appomattox Court House for General Robert E. Lee's surrender. After the war Moore attended classes at Mt. Union College in Ohio before migrating ,in 1874, to Enterprise, Kansas. For a few years he taught school in the Enterprise community until he passed the bar, in 1878, and began a long and successful career as a lawyer in Dickinson County. Moore practiced law in Solomon City for a short period of time before moving, in 1882, to Abilene, Kansas. In the former cow town, he devoted his time and energy to upholding the law and defending citizen's rights. Moore's trust and integrity as a lawyer preceded him. In 1896, he was appointed Judge of the Eighth Judicial District of the State of Kansas. He served on the bench for nearly thirteen years before stepping down in January of 1909. After leaving the bench, Moore was appointed court reporter to the Kansas Supreme Court until failing health forced him to step down in 1929. On June 6, 1929 after a prolonged illness, Moore passed away at the age of eighty at his home in Abilene, Kansas.

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