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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 24 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Wesley Horner

Stephenson

This cabinet card shows John Wesley Horner, (1834-1874). A veteran of the Civil War, he served as colonel of the 18th Michigan Infantry before becoming the fifth President of Baker University in Baldwin, Kansas, (1866-1867). Within a year of his presidency, he left Baker to pursue a career as a newspaper publisher. On January 6, 1869, Horner and A. S. Cory founded the Chetopa Advance, the second newspaper, in Labette County, Kansas. He held the positions of editor and publisher until he sold the business, in 1873, to L. J. Van Landingham. On August 16, 1874, Horner passed away at the age of forty during a stay at the Kansas Insane Asylum. He was later buried on the grounds of the asylum. The photograph was taken in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Quereau

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Kansas Territory to a friend Quereau of New England. It appeared that Goodnow was growing tired of the hard -scrabble life in the Territory, which was "decidedly injurious" to his constitution. He also showed signs of discouragement regarding the founding of a college in K.T., resigned to the idea that "for the time to come little can be done educationally." Goodnow told Quereau that he was actively seeking a teaching job back in the States.

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Resolution of the Boston Preacher's Meeting

This resolution, "unanimously adopted" by the members of the Boston Preacher's Meeting, approved the establishment of Blue Mont Central College near Manhattan, Kansas Territory, by Reverend Joseph Denison, an "old friend" of the Boston Preachers. Denison had emigrated to K.T. following Isaac Goodnow, and was working with him to obtain support for the college.

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Samuel W. Greer, report

Greer, Samuel W

This printed report was submitted to the Kansas Territorial Legislature by Gov. Medary on January 4, 1860. S. W. Greer, the Territorial Superintendent of Common Schools reported that fifteen counties had submitted reports and schools were taught in 136 districts comprising 7,029 children. He reported on how he visited school districts and included some information on various types of schools in the state. He wrote that the pay for the superintendent was inadequate, due to the value of territorial scrip being worth 30 cents on the dollor. He indicated that he had to use $500 of his own funds in the past year. He wrote about the need to establish normal schools (for training teachers) and to hold teachers' institutes. He wanted to increase the standards for teacher qualifications. He also discussed various aspects of educational methodologies of the period. He included short reports from the following counties: Douglas, Anderson, Jackson, Nemaha, and Osage as well as some statistics from all organized counties. This report was taken from the Journal of the House of Representatives, Kansas Territory, 1859, pages 34 through 82.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Thomas Hopkins Webb to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas Webb, Secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote to Isaac Goodnow, indicating his overwhelming approval for the creation of a college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, not knowing of a "more beautiful and eligible spot than the one selected." Webb communicated his pride in the fact that a Free State supporter would be the one to initiate such a project, and told Goodnow he had recently received a $12,000 donation from a Massachusetts man, which was to support the college.

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Thomas Hopkins Webb to Martin Franklin Conway

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas H. Webb, secretary of the New England Emigrant Aid Company, wrote from Boston, Massachusetts to Martin F. Conway, general agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company in Kansas Territory. Webb informed Conway that the Company's Executive Committee had approved Isaac Goodnow's request for a donation for Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Bluemont College later became Kansas State University.

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Resolution of the New England Emigrant Aid Company

Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866

Thomas Webb drafted this copy of a resolution adopted by the New England Emigrant Aid Company Executive Committee, which moved to allow Isaac Goodnow to sell twenty Manhattan town lots owned by the Company, with 50% of the proceeds going to support Goodnow's fund to support the founding of a college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Isaac Goodnow was an early resident of Manhattan, Kansas, and was a free-state supporter. He was a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention and was one of the founders of Bluemont College.

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Indenture, purchase of town lots by Bluemont College Trustees

This indenture outlines the terms of a sale of thirteen acres of land, sold by Thomas and Eleanor Wells to the Trustees of the Bluemont Central College Association, which included as its members Joseph Denison, Isaac Goodnow, Samuel D. Houston, Washington Marlott, C.E. Blood, and William A. McCullow.

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