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Page 1 of 30, showing 10 records out of 297 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Governor Andrew Shoeppel doctor shortage correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1943-1947 : Schoeppel)

This correspondence between Governor Schoeppel and various individuals, including Senator Arthur Capper, addresses the serious shortage of medical doctors in Kansas in the later summer of 1945. Because of the urgent need for trained medical personnel during World War II, thousands of doctors either joined the military or worked in military-run facilities. As a result, many states found themselves lacking the medical personnel that they needed to take care of the civilians not directly involved in fighting the war.

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Dorothea Dix correspondence

Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1802-1887

Dorothea Dix's papers consist of correspondence from Miss Dix to various people, as well as some correspondence in which Miss Dix was concerned, but not directly involved. Dix was an advocate for social welfare, particularly supporting the establishment and maintenance of mental hospitals for the mentally ill, disabled, or poor. She was instrumental in the proposed legislation of the "Bill for the Benefit of the Indigent Insane." During the Civil War, Dix was appointed Superintendent of Army Nurses. Much of the correspondence concerns Dix's efforts to bring lifeboats and other help to Sable Island in Nova Scotia, an area known for shipwrecks and where many with mental illnesses were sent, sometimes against their will. These papers are part of the historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives.

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Martin Anderson

This black and white photograph shows a painting of Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), from Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks on ,August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major on November 22, 1863 after the regiment was reassigned, in the summer of 1863, as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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John Gideon Haskell

Waite, Steven H.

This cabinet card shows John Gideon Haskell, (1832-1907), Civil War veteran and architect for the state of Kansas. He migrated to Lawrence, Kansas, in the summer of 1857, to begin his architectural career but a severe drought and the start of the Civil War put his future plans on hold. In July of 1861, Haskell was mustered into service as assistant quartermaster general of Kansas and he was appointed as quartermaster for the Third Kansas and the Tenth Kansas Volunteers. He, also, served as assistant quartermaster on the staff of General James Blunt and later became chief quartermaster of the Army of the Frontier. After the war, Haskell resumed his profession with the appointment, in 1866, as the architect for the state of Kansas. During his tenure, he designed the east wing of the Kansas Capitol and was responsible for overseeing the entire construction of the capitol. In addition to his responsibilities at the statehouse, Haskell was the chief architect for the Chase County Courthouse, the Douglas County Courthouse and many of the buildings at the University of Kansas. In 1907, after a long and successful career, John Gideon Haskell passed away at the age of seventy-five after a sudden illness at his home in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Military commission for Oliver S. Coffin

United States. President (1861-1865 : Lincoln)

This document is a military commission for Oliver S. Coffin, appointing him Assistant Quartermaster of the Volunteers with the rank of captain. The commission is signed by Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and Edwin McMasters Stanton, Secretary of War.

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A. H. Reeder to Franklin Crane

Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864

Andrew Reeder, former governor of Kansas Territory, wrote from Easton, Pennsylvania to Dr. Franklin Crane of Topeka. The letter discussed business interests in Kansas Territory and prospects for its admission to the union. Reeder also suggested it might be beneficial to replace place names, which had been established by the bogus legislature, that had pro-slavery connections.

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Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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Martin Anderson

Brown's Photographic Gallery

This carte de visite shows Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), of Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks, on August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major, on November 22, 1863, after the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the summer of 1863. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Dwight David Eisenhower to Joseph Little Bristow, United States Senator

Eisenhower, Dwight David, 1890-1969

This letter was written by Dwight David Eisenhower, 1890-1969, to Joseph Little Bristow, 1861-1944, United States Senator, inquiring about an appointment to either the Naval Academy or West Point. Eisenhower explains that he has not received a response from Bristow and asks about taking a competitive examination for an appointment. The complete set of correspondence related to Eisenhower's appointment to a military academy is available in Kansas Memory item 208267.

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