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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard possibly taken when she graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

Goldberg, Jack

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard who was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard

A portrait of Frank and Xavia Hightower Howard. They were married in 1942 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Victoria Murdoch-Hightower

A portrait of Victoria Murdoch-Hightower who was born in 1888. She married Rufus Hightower, a police officer, in the 1920s. He died in the line of duty, and after his death, Victoria found work as a probation officer. Later she went to Madam C. J. Walker's School of Cosmetology in Kansas City, Kansas and after graduation, she worked at Newt Bower's funeral home in Coffeyville, Kansas. When he decided to sell the business, she purchased it and changed the name to the Hightower Funeral Home. She became the first female African-American funeral director in Kansas. Victoria expanded her business when she purchased the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. She later sold the funeral home in Coffeyville. Victoria died in 1942, and her daughter Xavia Earline Hightower obtained her funeral director's and embalmer's licenses and began operating the funeral home. Xavia sold the business in 1998.

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Frank Howard

This is a portrait of Frank Howard, who was married to Xavia Earline Hightower-Howard. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer, and she owned the Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard cutting a cake on her 90th birthday with her daughter Frankie Mason looking on. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard speaking to an unidentified group. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Xavia Hightower Howard

A photograph of Xavia Hightower Howard at an awards banquet. Xavia was born in 1916 and lived in Wichita, Kansas. Her mother Victoria Murdoch-Hightower owned and operated Citizens Funeral Home. In 1941, Xavia graduated from Williams Institute of Mortuary Science, Kansas City, Kansas. After her mother's death in 1942, Xavia became the proprietor of Citizens Funeral Home. She was the first female African-American licensed funeral director and embalmer in Kansas. Xavia was active in the community serving on many committees and boards. She retired from the funeral business in 1998.

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Victoria Murdoch-Hightower

Robinson Studio

A portrait of Victoria Murdoch-Hightower. Victoria was born in 1888 and later married Rufus Hightower, a police officer, in the 1920s. He died in the line of duty, and after his death, Victoria found work as a probation officer. Later, she went to Madam C. J. Walker's School of Cosmetology in Kansas City, Kansas and after graduation, she worked at Newt Bower's funeral home in Coffeyville, Kansas. When Newt decided to sell the business, she purchased it and changed the name to Hightower Funeral Home. She became the first female African-American funeral director in Kansas. Victoria expanded her business when she purchased Citizens Funeral Home in Wichita, Kansas. She later sold the funeral home in Coffeyville. Victoria died in 1942. Her daughter Xavia Earline Hightower, obtained her funeral director's and embalmer's licenses and began operating the funeral home. Xavia sold the business in 1998.

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