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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

George W. Smith, Jr. to Kansas Central Committee

Smith, G.W. (George W.) 1806-1878

George W. Smith, Jr. of Lawrence, Kansas Territory, requests a supply of "arms . . . for distribution among the Free State men who have formed themselves into Companies." Smith's signature identifies him as Captain, "Munger Battalion, Free State Forces." Smith writes that he led "a force of 32 mounted" men, most of whom were veterans of the "wars of Kansas," and requests the loan of "32 sabres [sic] and any revolvers that you may have to give them."

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E. R. Falley to Kansas Central Committee

Falley, Edwin R.

In this undated letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, E. R. Falley informs the Kansas Central Committee that he had lost a gun loaned to him by "Mr. Wilder" (D. W. Wilder?) while serving with a free-state militia company at Blanton's bridge (Napoleon B. Blanton, on the Wakarusa River in Douglas County) in June 1856. Wilder was demanding payment, and Falley asks the committee to reimburse "Mr. Wilder for said gun."

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Francis Tomes and Sons to Thaddeus Hyatt, receipts

These two receipts, from Francis Tomes and Sons, New York, detail supplies acquired to benefit the free state cause. They include the prices of Bowie knives, Colt pistols, and other pieces pertaining to the use of firearms.

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Invoice of property received of Col. Shalor W. Eldridge

Kansas State Central Committee

This is a copy of an invoice most likely created during the late fall or winter 1856-1857. Starting with five Colt Revolvers, the invoice identifies over thirty separate listings for various firearms, foodstuffs, harness, etc., plus a good number of horses and mules, received from Colonel Shalor W. Eldridge. Among the different items listed are cartridges, blankets, canvas tents, shovels, bayonets, tin cups, and "25 old Sabors."

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Thaddeus Hyatt letters

Hyatt, Thaddeus

These two, incomplete, excerpts of letters written by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, describe the early workings of this committee and its efforts for the free state cause. Copy No. 3 discusses the "Tabernacle Committee" and the appropriation of side arms and Sharps rifles. Copy No. 4 refers to J. M. Winchell, authorizing him to make a withdrawal from the New York Kansas Fund. [The first page of the letters, which is included in the text version, was not scanned for display on this web site.]

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Harvey Bostwick Hurd to John Brown

Hurd, H. B.

From Chicago, National Kansas Committee secretary H. B. Hurd sent John Brown a copy of a resolution passed by the committee on April 1, 1857: first, in light of the fact that the public was no longer contributing to the cause, the committee could not continue its normal operations; and second, the secretary was to inform major donors that the committee would necessarily close "operations unless immediately sustained by liberal Contributions." Thus, Hurd could not send Brown the $500 dollars requested (apparently to cover the first payment to Charles Blair for the "spears").

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George W. Hunt and C. Stearns to Blood, Hutchinson, et. al.

Hunt, George W.

On behalf of a committee of Lawrence citizens, Hunt and Stearns write the State Central Committee of Kansas "to urge upon your attention several important points in reference to the present condition of Kansas." They were convinced that a "storm" from Missouri was about "to burst upon the devoted heads of the freemen of Kansas" and "perhaps to deluge Kansas with rivers of blood." The committee urges the state and national organizations to help them prepare for the storm, while things were relatively calm, with an adequate supply of arms and ammunition and men. They call only for "moral heroes" who would not follow the "principles of Border Ruffianism."

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Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt

Searl, Albert D

The author wrote from Tabor, Iowa to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. He began the letter by mentioning a skirmish between pro-slavery and free state forces somewhere between Lawrence and Topeka. This correspondence also deals with emigrant settlements within the territory, the shipment of weapons and provisions, and the morale among the emigrants as they struggled to make ends meet. Furthermore, Searl mentioned a great deal about James Lane and his activities within Kansas Territory.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson

Notman Photo Co.

Thomas Wentworth Higginson was an ardent Northern abolitionist. He also served as an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, procuring rifles, powder, cartridges and other materials for free state settlers in Kansas. He was from Worcester, Massachusetts, but he made a trip to Kansas in 1856.

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James M. Winchell to Thaddeus Hyatt

Winchell, James M

James M. Winchell wrote from Burlington to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, regarding an emigrant train of 500 settlers heading south from Iowa City. The author intended to travel to speak with Governor Geary before he met up with the emigrants. Winchell also included in this letter a private insert pertaining to the unscrupulous dealings of a Kansas politician named Dr. Root.

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