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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 24 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Richard E. Hickock

Kansas State Penitentiary

An inmate photograph of Richard Hickock copied from his Kansas State Prison inmate file. Hickock and his accomplice, Perry Smith, were convicted of first degree murder for the brutal 1959 killings of Herb and Bonnie Clutter, their daughter, Nancy, and son, Kenyon, in Holcomb, Kansas. The murders inspired the true-crime novel "In Cold Blood" by Truman Capote.

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John Anderson, Jr.,

This colored portrait shows John Anderson, Jr., a lawyer and politician from Olathe, Kansas. He begins his political career in 1946 when he is elected as a Republican for county attorney of Johnson County. In 1952 Anderson is elected to the Kansas Senate representing District Sixth of Johnson County. A position he serves from 1953 to 1956 before his appointment as Attorney General of Kansas. He serves from 1956 to 1961 and wins the elections of 1956 and 1958. In the November general election of 1960, Anderson defeats Democratic incumbent George Docking to become the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas serving from 1961 to 1965. He is also the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official home of the Kansas Governor.

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Roy Freeland

Barton

A portrait of Roy Freeland, Secretary, Kansas State Board of Agriculture, 1950-1976.

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John Anderson, Jr.

This formal portrait shows John Anderson, Jr., a lawyer and politician from Olathe, Kansas. He begins his political career in 1946 when he is elected as a Republican for county attorney of Johnson County. In 1952 Anderson is elected to the Kansas Senate representing District Sixth of Johnson County. A position he serves from 1953 to 1956 before his appointment as Attorney General of Kansas. He serves from 1956 to 1961 and wins the elections of 1956 and 1958. In the November general election of 1960, Anderson defeats Democratic incumbent George Docking to become the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas serving from 1961 to 1965. He is also the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official home of the Kansas Governor.

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John Anderson Jr.

This is a portrait of Governor John Anderson Jr. inscribed to "Monte Canfield with personal regards", dated May 22, 1961. Anderson served in the Kansas Senate from 1953 to 1956, was Attorney General of Kansas from 1956 to 1961, and was the thirty-sixth Governor of Kansas from 1961 to 1965. Anderson was the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official residents of Kansas Governors.

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John Anderson, Jr.

This formal portrait shows John Anderson, Jr., a lawyer and politician from Olathe, Kansas. He begins his political career in 1946 when he is elected as a Republican for county attorney of Johnson County. In 1952 Anderson is elected to the Kansas Senate representing District Sixth of Johnson County. A position he serves from 1953 to 1956 before his appointment as Attorney General of Kansas. He serves from 1956 to 1961 and wins the elections of 1956 and 1958. In the November general election of 1960, Anderson defeats Democratic incumbent George Docking to become the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas serving from 1961 to 1965. He is also the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official home of the Kansas Governor.

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Governor John Anderson Jr. in Governors' Office

This is a photograph of Governor John Anderson Jr., the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas, surrounded by a group of people holding a U. S. centennial flag in the Governors' Office at the State Capital.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

A photograph showing Mr. and Mrs. Glee S. Smith, Jr. at the Kansas Agricultural Convention annual dinner, possibly held in Topeka, Kansas.

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Open house at the Pawnee Indian Village Museum, Republic County

Three views of the open house at Pawnee Indian Village Museum in Republic County, Kansas. The Pawnee Indian Museum is the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700?s. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The portion of this site that was saved included 22 earth lodge depressions, numerous storage pit depressions, and remains of the fortification wall. Two house depressions were excavated in 1949 but intensive investigation of the site did not occur until 1965 under the direction of Kansas State Archeologist Tom Witty. In 1967 the museum was constructed around one of the largest of the lodge depressions before it was excavated. What the residents of the lodge left behind was uncovered by the archeologists and left in the exact same spots. Only eight of the 22 lodge depressions have been excavated. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.

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