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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 13 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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William L. Sayers in Hill City, Kansas

These two photographs show William L. Sayers, an attorney, in his office in Hill City, Kansas. Sayers was born around 1872 in Nebraska and moved to Hill City, Kansas, with his family in 1888. There at the age of 15 he earned a teaching certificate, however, he had to wait until he turned 16 to teach. After teaching school for several years, he became clerk of the court for Graham County. Sayers used his spare time to read law books. In 1893, he was admitted to the bar and took classes at the University of Kansas. Although he never graduated from law school, he was elected county attorney for Graham county in 1900, 1912, and 1914. His younger brother John followed him in this position in 1918. He was the second African American to be elected Graham County Attorney; the first was G. W. Jones who was elected in 1896. The Sayers brothers practiced law in Graham County for their entire careers.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

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Earl Thomas Reynolds to Governor Fred Hall

Reynolds, Earl Thomas

This letter was written by Earl Thomas Reynolds, a lawyer in Coffeyville, Kansas, to Governor Fred Hall. Reynolds was concerned that black people in Kansas were not receiving adequate patronage and political party representation in or by the Republican Party, particularly in the third district. Mr Reynolds inquired why should blacks continue to support the Republican Party, at all levels of government, if their support is not rewarded by the party.

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John Brown to Thomas Russell

Brown, John, 1800-1859

From his jail cell in Charles Town, Virginia, just days before he was to go on trial for treason, John Brown wrote seeking legal counsel for himself and fellow prisoners. Brown mentioned his wounds, but said they were "doing well," expresses special concern for "the young men prisoners," and closed "Do not send an ultra Abolitionist."

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William Bolden Townsend

This illustration shows William Bolden Townsend, (1854-?), taken from I. Garland Penn's book "The Afro-American Press". Townsend born into slavery ,in 1854, near Huntsville, Alabama overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished journalist, and lawyer. At the age of six he migrated to Kansas, in 1860, with his mother to receive a "common school education". On the completion of his education, Townsend became a teacher and taught for a brief period in Mississippi before returning to his adopted state. By 1876, he was a correspondent for the "The Colored Citizen" at Fort Scott, Kansas and associate editor, in 1878, to "The Radical" at Leavenworth, Kansas. In addition to his career as a journalist, Townsend held a number of county and state appointed offices and was active in the Republican party before he entered law school, in 1889, at the University of Kansas. When he received his degree, in 1891, Townsend established a law practice in Leavenworth County but the radical tension in the community became so dangerous that he feared for his safety and eventually left Kansas.

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Lutie A. Lytle

Portrait of Lutie Lytle, one of the nation's earliest African American female lawyers. Her family came to Topeka and lived at 1435 Monroe Street and Lutie and her brothers attended Topeka schools, including Topeka High School. Lytle graduated from Central Tennessee College and was admitted to the Criminal Court in Memphis, Tennessee, after passing an oral exam. She is reported to be the first African American woman to be licensed to practice in Tennessee, and third in the United States. After returning to Topeka, she became the first African American woman admitted to the Kansas bar. This portrait was copied from A New Negro for a New Century.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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Members of the Topeka, Kansas Bar Association

This black and white photograph panel shows members from the Topeka Bar Association, the Kansas Supreme Court and the District Judges of Kansas. In the center of the panel images have been inserted of U.S. Vice-President Charles Curtis, U.S. Circuit Judge Geo. T. McDermott, and U.S. District Judge Richard J. Hopkins. In the lower portion of the panel, on the left-hand side, are seven African American lawyers. One of them is Elisha Scott who prosecuted the civil rights case of Brown vs. Topeka Board of Education.

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