Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

People -- African Americans (Remove)
Date -- 1880s (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 17 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

previewthumb

Charles M. Sheldon and Central Congregational Church correspondence

Charles M. Sheldon (1857-1946) served as minister of the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas from 1889 to 1920. He was also an author of the international best seller, In His Steps, which was published in 1897. A series of correspondence, presented here, is arranged in chronological order. A complete description of the entire collection is available through a link below. The correspondence consists of letters, postcards, cards, one notebook containing letters and newspaper clippings, and assorted personal items such as his self-portrait drawings. The majority of the correspondence consists of handwritten and typed letters to and from individuals, members or groups related to the Central Congregational Church, and organizations associated with his lifelong activities as a pastor and author, including Theo Peers, Ethel Peers, Anna Heartburg, Dorothy Heartburg, Helen T. Capps, Lida R. Hardy, May Flickinger, Charles Warren Helsley, Luther D. Whittemore, Hamilton Holt, Robert Thomson Jr., Norman J. Rimes, Lloyd George, James Wise, Arthur Capper, Michael I. Pupin, Alf M. Landon, Roy B. Guild, Arthur E. Hertzler, Samuel J. Crumbine, Wilbert E. Dull, M. de Arrude Camargo, Frank J. Warren, Beatrice Hoover, Samuel C. Spalding, H. T. Chase, Bishop Wise, The Emporia Gazette, Green Gables (the Dr. Benjamin F. Bailey Sanatorium), The Atlantic Monthly, The World?s Christian Endeavor Union, Plymouth Congregational Church, University of Illinois at Urbana Department of Physics, Abraham S. Hoyo, Harry Emerson Fosdick, International College in Turkey, Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Rollins College in Florida, The Topeka City Commission, Students? Christian Association of South Africa, Crosset & Dunlap Inc. Publishers in New York, Christian Herald Association, The Texas Herald, The Henry F. Henrichs Publications, Frankfort Rotary Club, and Notre-Dame de France/Jerusalem. There are letters involving other individuals, including Charles W. Helsley, Emma Crabb, H. J. Colburn, Robert Stone, Arthur G. Sellen, Henry F. Henrichs, Logan Shoop, Frank Jacobs, Hugh F. Mckean, Lee Braxton, Cady Hodge, Charles S. Lawrence, Elizabeth Turner Rawlings, Elisabeth Ebright, R. L. McNatt, Gale L. Beck, John H. Lehman, Helen Bradford, and Everett R. Daves. Charles W. Helsley was a minister at the Central Congregational Church after the passing of Charles M. Sheldon, and Emma Crabb was in charge of the Sheldon Collection at the Central Congregational Church.

previewthumb

Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

previewthumb

Barbershop, Dodge City, Kansas

This is a photo of the interior of an unidentified barber shop with barbers in view, Dodge City, Kansas.

previewthumb

David Ware

Leonard & Martin

A portrait of David Ware who was born in Missouri as a slave, but later fled to Kansas. During the Civil War, he served in the First Kansas Colored Infantry. In 1873, he secured a job as janitor at the Kansas capitol. Ware was highly respected in the community where he was a member of the Second Baptist Church, Great Western Lodge, and the Shawnee County Colored Horse Fair Association. He died in 1888 and the flag at the capitol was flown at half-mast and legislators observed a moment of silence.

previewthumb

John Brown portrait

Ruggles, Quartus E.

Oil portrait of John Brown, painted in 1882 by Quartus Ruggles. The famed abolitionist joined his sons in Kansas in 1855 and engaged in often violent activity directed at proslavery supporters. This portrait depicts Brown as he would have appeared after the Battle of Osawatomie, where free-state and proslavery bands clashed in 1856. The artist, Quartus Ruggles, never met Brown himself but painted this portrait over 20 years after the man?s death. It was displayed in the Society?s portrait gallery for many years.

previewthumb

Nick Chiles

Portrait of Nick Chiles, publisher of the Plain-Dealer newspaper, Topeka, Kansas.

previewthumb

Part 12: Exodusters, in first annual report of the Bureau of Labor and Industrial Statistics

Kansas Bureau of Labor

This excerpt of the Kansas Bureau of Labor report includes only Part 12, the portion of the report focusing on the Exodusters in Wyandotte, Kansas. The report includes transcribed testimonies of Exodusters as well as a detailed table showing statistics compiled from seventeen families, including their location, ages, health, and occupations. The report also includes a few references to Exodusters in Topeka.

previewthumb

Tennessee Town Kindergarten, Topeka, Kansas

This photograph shows June Chapman, standing, and Mary Jordan, seated, at tables with their students at Tennessee Town Kindergarten in Topeka, Kansas.

previewthumb

1880 census of Farmer Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Farmer Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|

People -- African Americans

Date -- 1880s

Date

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation