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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 21 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

First Thanksgiving Sermon

McVicar, Peter, 1829-1903

This sermon by Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.

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Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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Charles M. Sheldon and Central Congregational Church correspondence

Charles M. Sheldon (1857-1946) served as minister of the Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas from 1889 to 1920. He was also an author of the international best seller, In His Steps, which was published in 1897. A series of correspondence, presented here, is arranged in chronological order. A complete description of the entire collection is available through a link below. The correspondence consists of letters, postcards, cards, one notebook containing letters and newspaper clippings, and assorted personal items such as his self-portrait drawings. The majority of the correspondence consists of handwritten and typed letters to and from individuals, members or groups related to the Central Congregational Church, and organizations associated with his lifelong activities as a pastor and author, including Theo Peers, Ethel Peers, Anna Heartburg, Dorothy Heartburg, Helen T. Capps, Lida R. Hardy, May Flickinger, Charles Warren Helsley, Luther D. Whittemore, Hamilton Holt, Robert Thomson Jr., Norman J. Rimes, Lloyd George, James Wise, Arthur Capper, Michael I. Pupin, Alf M. Landon, Roy B. Guild, Arthur E. Hertzler, Samuel J. Crumbine, Wilbert E. Dull, M. de Arrude Camargo, Frank J. Warren, Beatrice Hoover, Samuel C. Spalding, H. T. Chase, Bishop Wise, The Emporia Gazette, Green Gables (the Dr. Benjamin F. Bailey Sanatorium), The Atlantic Monthly, The World?s Christian Endeavor Union, Plymouth Congregational Church, University of Illinois at Urbana Department of Physics, Abraham S. Hoyo, Harry Emerson Fosdick, International College in Turkey, Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, Rollins College in Florida, The Topeka City Commission, Students? Christian Association of South Africa, Crosset & Dunlap Inc. Publishers in New York, Christian Herald Association, The Texas Herald, The Henry F. Henrichs Publications, Frankfort Rotary Club, and Notre-Dame de France/Jerusalem. There are letters involving other individuals, including Charles W. Helsley, Emma Crabb, H. J. Colburn, Robert Stone, Arthur G. Sellen, Henry F. Henrichs, Logan Shoop, Frank Jacobs, Hugh F. Mckean, Lee Braxton, Cady Hodge, Charles S. Lawrence, Elizabeth Turner Rawlings, Elisabeth Ebright, R. L. McNatt, Gale L. Beck, John H. Lehman, Helen Bradford, and Everett R. Daves. Charles W. Helsley was a minister at the Central Congregational Church after the passing of Charles M. Sheldon, and Emma Crabb was in charge of the Sheldon Collection at the Central Congregational Church.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown, daughter of John Stillman Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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June Chapman with students

This is a view of teacher June Chapman with two of her Tennessee Town Kindergarten students in Topeka, Kansas. This was the kindergarten for African American children sponsored by the Central Congregational Church, Topeka, Kansas. Dr. Charles Monroe Sheldon started the kindergarten in 1893 and served as pastor of the church from 1889-1920.

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John Stillman Brown to William Brown

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Brown admonished his son for not writing. He discusses the cold weather and the political conditions in territorial Kansas, including his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. Brown predicted high immigration to Kansas in the coming spring, and also predicted that "Kansas is sure to be Free" and without any slaves within two years.

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Kansas and Nebraska Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Minutes of the Third Session

Methodist Episcopal Church. Kansas and Nebraska Conference

The annual conference was held in Topeka, Kansas Territory from April 15 through 19, 1858. The minutes included the names of those attending as well as the business conducted. It listed the various ministerial appointments in Kansas and Nebraska as well as the membership of the committees. The minutes reported on educational efforts at Baker University and Blue Mount Central College. It contained information on the church's stand on slavery and temperance. The constitution of the Kansas and Nebraska Conference Missionary Society was included in the report as were statistics for the various churches.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair and his family had just arrived in Kansas City, Missouri. This appears to be a draft of a letter he sent to Reverend S. S. Jocelyn of the American Missionary Society to describe the poor conditions for settlers in Kansas Territory, his and his wife's illnesses, and that the doctor who treated them owned slaves.

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