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Page 1 of 1, showing 3 records out of 3 total, starting on record 1, ending on 3

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas

A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote from Leavenworth to his father in Ohio seeking his assistance with a legal matter involving claims to the land "reserved to certain half breeds of the Kansas tribe." Most of this land was occupied by squatters and questions of legal title and transfer were being litigated in the territorial and federal courts.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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