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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Barclay's Business Directory of Leavenworth for 1859

Pierse, Allen

In addition to a listing of businesses and advertisements, the directory included the elected officials for the city of Leavenworth for 1858-59 and the newspapers published in Leavenworth. A few women are listed as owners of businesses. The information for the directory was compiled by Allen Pierse.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C.E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood told Hill that, by mistake, a house had been built on one of Hill's town lots. He offered to trade lots with Hill, maintaining that both were of equal quality and value, and told him that the house would serve as the printing office of a new newspaper, the Manhattan Statesman.

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Charles Robinson to Amos Adams Lawrence

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts. Robinson thanked Lawrence for his unfailing support of the enterprise of the Territory and claimed his devotion to work done in his interest. He discussed Lawrence's development, having secured the offices of three free state newspapers, but expressed anxiety about the upcoming territorial election. However, Robinson vowed that his men would not resort to fraudulent voting to win the majority over proslavery supporters.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, advised his wife in Meadville, Pennsylvania concerning travel. He restated advice from his much longer letter of September 26th. He wrote of his nomination, yet to be confirmed by vote, as a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention. Holliday decided to decline the editorship of The Kansas Freeman. He expressed sympathy for Lizzie Holliday, his wife's sister, and suggested boarding when Mary Holliday and their daughter Lillie arrived, as he had not yet built a house.

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Edmund Jones to Hiram Hill

Jones, Edmund

Edmund Jones wrote briefly from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. He referred to the security of town lots and a previously sent newspaper. Mr. Fuller, a delinquent renter, was "selling liquor" in Hill's house. Jones suggested that Hill come soon.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he had stopped on his way to visit Governor Andrew H. Reeder at the Shawnee Indian Mission. Holliday hoped to make the growing Topeka the capital of Kansas Territory. In Lawrence, a hotel keeper had died and George W. Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom, was ill. Despite mail-delaying winter storms further east, the weather continued mildly. Holliday described his financial investments and requested money for his trip to Meadville, more urgent as the birth of their first child approached.

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Oscar Dayton to Orville Chester Brown

Dayton, Oscar V

This letter, written by Oscar Dayton from the Banking Office of Dayton and Co., Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, was addressed to Orville C. Brown, a founder of Osawatomie. The main subject of the letter was a printing press and other pertinent materials that were available to the residents of Osawatomie, if they in turn paid Dayton's debts and granted him deeds for town lots in Osawatomie. That was Dayton's preferred method of payment. Furthermore, Dayton informed Brown that there were other men who were interested in purchasing the printing press, so he needed a speedy reply to this letter. It concluded with personal regards to Mr. Brown's family.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.

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Milton M. Powers to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

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