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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 54 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Alfred Larzelere

Alfred Larzelere of Doniphan County was active in free state politics. He served as speaker of the Kansas House in 1859 and as a delegate to the Leavenworth constitutional convention. He was also a member of the Free State Central committee.

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William C. Menninger, M.D.

These two photographs show Dr. Will with his secretarial staff and at his 60th birthday party. Dr. Will is known as one of the key influences in the development of a psychiatric guide which later became known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, still in use today in revised form.

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Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Harry Walter Colmery, as a young man.

This is a photographic portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The portrait of Colmery was taken as a young man.

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Harry Walter Colmery with his wife Minerva and children

Harry W. Colmery, his wife Minerva (Mina), and their children Harry Jr., Mary, and Sarah are standing by a car.

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William C. Menninger, M.D., in Army uniform

William Menninger, M.D, photographed during his Army career in World War II. William and his father, Dr. C.F. Menninger and his brother Karl, established the Menninger Clinic, in Topeka, Kansas. William was instrumental in establishing the Menninger School of Psychiatry in Topeka to care for the veterans of WWII. He is known as one of the key influences in the development of a psychiatric guide which later became known as the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

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William Inge's childhood home, Independence, Kansas

William Inge's childhood home, located at 514 N. 4th Street in Independence, Kansas.

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Karl Menninger, M.D. and Phillip Holzman, M.D. at the Menninger Clinic, Topeka, Kansas

Dr. Phillip Holzman worked alongside Dr. Karl Menninger on various books and journal articles. They published the "Theory of Psychoanalytic Technique". This photograph shows both men in Dr. Karl's office. In the foreground is Menninger's poodle Babar.

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Nancy Landon Kassebaum with her children

A photograph of Nancy Landon Kassebaum with her children (l to r) John, Richard, Linda and Bill, taken on primary election night. Kassebaum was running as a Republican candidate for the United States Senate.

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Samuel J. Reader

Samuel J. Reader lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory, and participated in some free state activities. He wrote about his daily life (including descriptions of the Battles of Indianola and Hickory Point) in his diary, which he used as the basis for an autobiography he illustrated with drawings and watercolor paintings. This photograph is a copy that Reader made from a daguerreotype taken of him in 1855 at age eighteen. The copy was produced on March 1, 1894, in La Harpe, Hancock County, Illinois.

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