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People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
Date -- 1900s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 56 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel Jay Crumbine

Dr. Samuel Crumbine in the State Board of Health office with his assistants Warren Crumbine and Bernice Vreeland.

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Frederick Funston

Portrait of the officers who commanded the expedition that captured Filipino leader Emilio Aguinaldo on March 23, 1901 during the Spanish-American War. They are identified as: (left to right) Lieut. Mitshell, Capt. Hazzard, General Funston, Capt. Newton, and Lieut. Hazzard.

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Samuel Johnson Crawford

Leonard, J. H.

Portrait of Samuel Johnson Crawford, third Governor of Kansas from 1865to 1868. He is the youngest man to have served as Governor, being only 29 years old when elected. He resigned from office November 4, 1868 to take command of the 19th Kansas Regiment. He died in Topeka on October 21, 1913.

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Buster Keaton

This is a photograph of silent film comedian and director Joseph Frank "Buster" Keaton, 1895-1966, as a child. Keaton was born in Piqua, Kansas, and performed as a member of his parents' vaudevillian act from the age of three.

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Joseph Little Bristow

Harris & Ewing

This is a portrait of Joseph Little Bristow,1861-1944. He served as United States Senator from Kansas, 1909-1915.

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David Josiah Brewer, Kansas Supreme Court Justice

Copy of an original oil painting of David Josiah Brewer, Kansas Supreme Court Justice,1871-1884, United States Circuit Court Justice, 1884 -1889, and United States Supreme Court Justice, 1889 -1910.

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Frederick Funston

Harris & Ewing

A portrait of Brigadier General Frederick Funston, who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and became one of America's most famous military figures. Because of his height and weight, Funston failed an admissions test to the United States Military Academy in 1884. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. While there he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and became friends with future Pulitzer Prize winner William Allen White. After leaving the university, he worked as a trainman for the Santa Fe Railway and in 1890, took a reporter's job in Kansas City. After one year reporting the news, Funston moved into more scientific exploration, focusing primarily on botany. In the early 1890s, he participated in scientific expeditions in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. In 1896 he joined forces of Cubans who were fighting for independence from Spain. He was immediately promoted to captain of an artillery unit. Funston served eighteen months under Generals Maximo Gomez, Calixto Garcia, and others. During this time he was wounded three times, lost seventeen horses, and was captured once. Shortly after returning home, Kansas Governor Leedy appointed Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas Infantry, which was soon sent to the Philippine Islands. On February 4, 1899, the insurrection broke out. Because of his leadership Funston was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and in 1901 was given that rank in the regular army where he spent the rest of his life. In 1906 he did much to keep law and order in San Francisco and to provide relief to sufferers of the great earthquake. In 1914 he was in command of American troops on the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. Future general, John J. Pershing, was one of his subordinates. On November 17, 1914 Funston was made a major general. A heart attack took the life of the 51-year-old general on February 19, 1917. His college friend, William Allen White, called him "one of the most colorful figures in the American army from the day of Washington on down."

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Frederick Funston

A portrait of Brigadier General Frederick Funston, who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and became one of America's most famous military figures. Because of his height and weight, Funston failed an admissions test to the United States Military Academy in 1884. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. While there he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and became friends with future Pulitzer Prize winner William Allen White. After leaving the university, he worked as a trainman for the Santa Fe Railway and in 1890, took a reporter's job in Kansas City. After one year reporting the news, Funston moved into more scientific exploration, focusing primarily on botany. In the early 1890s, he participated in scientific expeditions in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. In 1896 he joined forces of Cubans who were fighting for independence from Spain. He was immediately promoted to captain of an artillery unit. Funston served eighteen months under Generals Maximo Gomez, Calixto Garcia, and others. During this time he was wounded three times, lost seventeen horses, and was captured once. Shortly after returning home, Kansas Governor Leedy appointed Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas Infantry, which was soon sent to the Philippine Islands. On February 4, 1899, the insurrection broke out. Because of his leadership Funston was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and in 1901 was given that rank in the regular army where he spent the rest of his life. In 1906 he did much to keep law and order in San Francisco and to provide relief to sufferers of the great earthquake. In 1914 he was in command of American troops on the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. Future general, John J. Pershing, was one of his subordinates. On November 17, 1914 Funston was made a major general. A heart attack took the life of the 51-year-old general on February 19, 1917. His college friend, William Allen White, called him "one of the most colorful figures in the American army from the day of Washington on down."

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Frederick Funston

A portrait of General Frederick Funston, who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and became one of America's most famous military figures. Because of his height and weight, Funston failed an admissions test to the United States Military Academy in 1884. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. While there he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and became friends with future Pulitzer Prize winner William Allen White. After leaving the university, he worked as a trainman for the Santa Fe Railway and in 1890, took a reporter's job in Kansas City. After one year reporting the news, Funston moved into more scientific exploration, focusing primarily on botany. In the early 1890s, he participated in scientific expeditions in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. In 1896 he joined forces of Cubans who were fighting for independence from Spain. He was immediately promoted to captain of an artillery unit. Funston served eighteen months under Generals Maximo Gomez, Calixto Garcia, and others. During this time he was wounded three times, lost seventeen horses, and was captured once. Shortly after returning home, Kansas Governor Leedy appointed Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas Infantry, which was soon sent to the Philippine Islands. On February 4, 1899, the insurrection broke out. Because of his leadership Funston was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and in 1901 was given that rank in the regular army where he spent the rest of his life. In 1906 he did much to keep law and order in San Francisco and to provide relief to sufferers of the great earthquake. In 1914 he was in command of American troops on the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. Future general, John J. Pershing, was one of his subordinates. On November 17, 1914 Funston was made a major general. A heart attack took the life of the 51-year-old general on February 19, 1917. His college friend, William Allen White, called him "one of the most colorful figures in the American army from the day of Washington on down."

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Frederick Funston

A portrait of General Frederick Funston, who grew up in Iola, Kansas, and became one of America's most famous military figures. Because of his height and weight, Funston failed an admissions test to the United States Military Academy in 1884. He enrolled and attended the University of Kansas from 1885 to 1888 but did not graduate. While there he joined the Phi Delta Theta fraternity and became friends with future Pulitzer Prize winner William Allen White. After leaving the university, he worked as a trainman for the Santa Fe Railway and in 1890, took a reporter's job in Kansas City. After one year reporting the news, Funston moved into more scientific exploration, focusing primarily on botany. In the early 1890s, he participated in scientific expeditions in the Dakota Badlands, Death Valley, and in Alaska along the Klondike and Yukon Rivers. In 1896 he joined forces of Cubans who were fighting for independence from Spain. He was immediately promoted to captain of an artillery unit. Funston served eighteen months under Generals Maximo Gomez, Calixto Garcia, and others. During this time he was wounded three times, lost seventeen horses, and was captured once. Shortly after returning home, Kansas Governor Leedy appointed Funston colonel of the 20th Kansas Infantry, which was soon sent to the Philippine Islands. On February 4, 1899, the insurrection broke out. Because of his leadership Funston was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers and in 1901 was given that rank in the regular army where he spent the rest of his life. In 1906 he did much to keep law and order in San Francisco and to provide relief to sufferers of the great earthquake. In 1914 he was in command of American troops on the Texas border during the difficulties with Pancho Villa. Future general, John J. Pershing, was one of his subordinates. On November 17, 1914 Funston was made a major general. A heart attack took the life of the 51-year-old general on February 19, 1917. His college friend, William Allen White, called him "one of the most colorful figures in the American army from the day of Washington on down."

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