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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 17 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union Frances Willard memorials

This material relates to memorials for Frances Willard, an American reformer for temperance and women's suffrage. She became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1879 and held the position until her death in 1898. The collection includes printed materials relating to the Frances Willard Memorial Fund, Frances Willard Day (September 28th) Citizenship Programs, correspondence of Mary Evelyn Dobbs and Alice K. McFarland, and surveys detailing visits made by Frances Willard to local unions across Kansas. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

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Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Samuel L. Adair to Mary P. Green

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this letter, Samuel Adair thanks Mary P. Green for $35 sent by the ladies of La Salle County, Illinois. He indicates that he would try to distribute the money to "no unworthy person," and that it would help relieve the suffering in the territory. He indicates that things were comparatively quiet. He refers to a lack of cash if settlers are required to pay for their land soon, as he fells most would need to take out mortgages. He reports that those suffering the most are families who were sick or where the men were in prison. He expresses gratitude for the support received from the East.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown, daughter of John Stillman Brown

Webber, L. R.

This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown. Webber wrote about sickness in the Brown family and about other personal matters, such as her father's work as a minister. He also kept her apprised of politics, both in Kansas and on the national scene, and spoke briefly of John Brown's "insane undertaking."

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J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing to James Griffing

Griffing, Jemima August (Goodrich)

J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing wrote from Hartford, Connecticut, to her husband, James Griffing, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Mrs. Griffing was visiting family and friends in the East for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. She reported on her trip from Owego, New York, to Hartford, and her decision to leave their young son, Johnny, in the care of Mr. Griffing's family in Owego. She described Johnny's behavior in some detail, and informed Mr. Griffing that she planned to start her trip back to Kansas Territory in October, 1859.

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The Last Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstrous Regiment of Women

Gordon, Robert (Reverend)

Rev. Robert Gordon apparently was the pastor at the First Baptist Church of Topeka, Kansas. This leaflet was written in response to efforts to defeat the constitutional amendment that would give Kansas women full suffrage in 1912. Gordon is a supporter of woman's suffrage and attempts to respond to arguments of those opposed to the amendment. Gordon states that "this organized, highly-financed, eleventh-hour assault is not inspired by honest conviction. It is a desperate effort born of a craven fear of good women on the part of men who know what women will do . . . ."

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday at Topeka, Kansas Territory. A thoughtful review of the previous year, her letter gave thanks for protection from harm despite sorrows and calamities. Using Biblical allusions and paraphrases, she joyfully expressed hope that eternal bliss begins with a well lived life, and encouraged her husband to consider misspent time and to carry out good New Year's resolutions.

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James Griffing to J. Augusta Goodrich Griffing

Griffing, James S. (James Sayre), 1822-1882

James Griffing wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife J. Augusta (Goodrich) Griffing. Mrs. Griffing was visiting her family in New York for the first time since her arrival in Kansas Territory in 1855. Griffing gave his wife instructions about which fruit seeds (plum, cherry, and peach) and cuttings (gooseberry and blackberry) to collect and transport back to Kansas Territory, and described his plan to purchase pine flooring in Leavenworth.

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Samuel L. Adair to Zu Adams

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair, Osawatomie, Kansas, described the two slaves that he had encountered. One was an eight to ten year old boy that had been hired by a merchant from Kansas City. The other slave of which he was aware was a woman owned by an Indian interpreter named Baptiste. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.

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