Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

People -- Women (Remove)
Thematic Time Period -- The Twenties, 1920 - 1929 (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 11 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

previewthumb

Consolidated school in Minneola, Kansas

This is a panoramic photo showing students and teachers standing outside the Consolidated School in Minneola, Clark County, Kansas. The students appear to be both primary and secondary students.

previewthumb

Garver Flying Circus

This black and white photograph shows members of the Garver Flying Circus at the Lone Tree Ranch in Attica, Kansas. Standing from left to right: David Garver, LeVaughn Neville, Ruth Garver, Mrs. R. O. Williamson (or Mrs. Ruby Arrowsmith), Ray O. Williamson ( or Jay Sadowsky), Karl Garver, Paul Duncan, Wayne Neville. The Garver Flying Circus, established around 1920 or 1921 by Karl Garver from Attica, Kansas, and Cyle Horchem an ex-army flyer from Ransom, Kansas, performed spectacular aerial stunts across the Kansas sky. The group of daredevils successfully entertained the crowds of spectators with death defying acts until tragedy struck in 1924, when Ruth Garver "Champion Lady Parachute Jumper" fell to her death from one thousand feet with a tangled parachute. Later that year, Cyle Horchem slipped and fell to his death as he climbed onto a wing while in flight. Karl Garver continued to perform at air shows, but eventually sold his airplanes and died of alcohol poisoning in 1926.

previewthumb

Graves Drug Store, Garnett, Kansas

Interior view of Graves Drug Store. Shown is the soda fountain, employees, and a customer.

previewthumb

Sara Wallace

This black and white portrait shows Sara Wallace, (1881-1930), taken from the Sept-Oct 1931 poetry magazine "The Harp". A native of Wilmington, Delaware, Mrs. Wallace and her husband Leslie were the publishers of the Larned, Kansas newspaper the "Tiller and Toiler". As a writer, she wrote about the daily activities surrounding her community. In a series of stories that were published in the "Tiller and Toiler", Mrs. Wallace captured the quality of life in a small Kansas town when she wrote about the daily lives of the women in and around the town of Larned. Her writing talents were put to paper until her death in 1930 at the age of forty-nine.

previewthumb

Nellie Cline

Nellie Cline, a native of Larned, Pawnee County, served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1921 to 1924. She is also credited with being the first female lawyer to argue a case before the United States Supreme Court.

previewthumb

Kansas State Postal Conference Convention in Topeka, Kansas

Willard

This is a panoramic photograph of the people attending the Kansas State Postal Conference-Convention held November 10, 1922, in Topeka, Kansas. They are posed on the steps of the Kansas State Capitol. There are a few women scattered throughout the crowd. There is a banner on the front row that says "Kansas RLCA Over 300% Gain 1922." RLCA stands for Rural Letter Carriers Association.

previewthumb

Minnie Johnson Grinstead

This is a portrait of Mineola "Minnie" Tamar Johnson Grinstead, 1869-1925, who was the first woman elected to the Kansas House of Representatives. Grinstead served from 1919 to 1923 as the representative from Liberal in Seward County, Kansas.

previewthumb

Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company's Fred Harvey House, Hutchinson, Kansas

This photograph shows a group of Harvey Girls gathered in the dining room of the Harvey House at the Bisonte Hotel in Hutchinson, Kansas. The facility designed by architect J.G. Holland opened in November of 1897. For a number of years the hotel provided service until the late 1940s when it closed its doors due to the decline in rail services. The building was razed between 1964 and 1965.

previewthumb

Ida M. Walker

Here are two photographs of Ida M. Walker who represented Norton County, District 101 in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1921 through 1923. In 1920, just after the 19th Amendment was ratified, Ida M. Walker was one of only 33 women nationwide elected to a state legislature. That year Kansas boasted four woman legislators, the second highest in the country. The three other legislators were Minnie L. Grinstead, Nellie Cline, and Minnie J. Minnich. Born in a sod house in Jewell County, Walker attended public schools before becoming a teacher herself. Walker took advantage of the few leadership roles available to women, serving as State President of both the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) and the Federation of Women's Clubs, the State Chairman of the Belgian Relief Fund women's section, and as Sunday School Superintendent in the Methodist Church.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2|