Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

People -- Women (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 9, showing 10 records out of 84 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Fern Gayden

This is a photograph of Fern Gayden possibly taken in Dunlap, Kansas. Fern Gayden was born September 29, 1904, in Dunlap, Kansas, where she attended elementary and secondary schools. She went on to attend Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia and taught school for one year. Fern Gayden moved to Chicago at the age of 23. She had a 50-year career as a social worker but became best known as a literary, fine arts, and political activist. A founding member of the South Side Writers Group in the 1930s, Fern Gayden's long and diverse career included leadership roles in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the South Side Community Art Center. During World War II, she co-published Negro Story magazine with Alice Browning.

previewthumb

Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

previewthumb

Martha Keys

This black and white photograph shows Martha Elizabeth Ludwig Keys. Keys was elected as a Democrat in 1974 to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas' second congressional district. She served two terms in Congress before being defeated for a third term in 1978. After her years as a congresswoman, Keys later served as a special adviser to the Secretary of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1979-1980, and assistant to the Secretary of Education, 1980. In 1985, she served as executive director for the Center of a New Democracy until 1987.

previewthumb

Barclay's Business Directory of Leavenworth for 1859

Pierse, Allen

In addition to a listing of businesses and advertisements, the directory included the elected officials for the city of Leavenworth for 1858-59 and the newspapers published in Leavenworth. A few women are listed as owners of businesses. The information for the directory was compiled by Allen Pierse.

previewthumb

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union general correspondence

This is correspondence sent and received by Mary Evelyn Dobbs, corresponding secretary of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union from 1907 to 1939. The letters arrived from people across the state, including the presidents of county chapters of the KWCTU. Most correspondence relates to planned public speeches and visits intended to establish and support new branches of the KWCTU. There are also communications from the state organization to local units. Specific items include a letter dated July 1, 1918, from Dobbs to F.L. Pinet with a manuscript entitled "Early Factors in Kansas Prohibition" intended for publication in the Kansas Teacher, advertising contracts for the KWCTU periodical Our Messenger, and a letter written to Dobbs from Clara E. Keys, a WCTU missionary in Africa. One letter recognizes Mary Sibbitt as the organizer of comfort kits provided for soldiers at Fort Leavenworth. Sibbitt, known as the "Kansas Cyclone," was an founding officer of the International Association of Women Ministers. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

previewthumb

Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union Frances Willard memorials

This material relates to memorials for Frances Willard, an American reformer for temperance and women's suffrage. She became president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in 1879 and held the position until her death in 1898. The collection includes printed materials relating to the Frances Willard Memorial Fund, Frances Willard Day (September 28th) Citizenship Programs, correspondence of Mary Evelyn Dobbs and Alice K. McFarland, and surveys detailing visits made by Frances Willard to local unions across Kansas. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

previewthumb

E. S. Whitney to Hiram Hill

Whitney, E.S.

E. S. Whitney wrote from Sumner, Kansas Territory, to her uncle, Hiram Hill. Whitney apologized for the long delay in communicating with him, and explained that her husband, Thaddeus Whitney, had been very busy lately and was doing his best to complete Hill's home. She also described her experience watching the border ruffians invade Lawrence, and her friends' and neighbors' reactions to the situation. Despite the violence and uncertainty, she was "not sorry yet" that she had come to Kansas, and told Hill that her husband would write him shortly to discuss business matters.

previewthumb

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

previewthumb

Kansas Territory citizens to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America

This unsigned statement was written to protest "the practice of taxing the people of the Territories for the support of a Government in which they are not represented." The residents of Kansas Territory complained that they had had no voice in how these tax dollars were appropriated, and they asked this "honorable body" to remit to them these taxes. Since this was during the drought of 1860, they declared that they would use these funds for famine relief.

previewthumb

Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Government and Politics

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material