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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

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A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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State Industrial School for Boys, Topeka, Kansas

This silent film documents the State Industrial School for Boys of Topeka, Kansas, in 1935 and depicts all aspects of the institution's educational, health, recreational, vocational and boarding programs. A segment of the film shows Governor Alfred M. Landon visiting the school and making a speech. The school opened in 1881 and sought to reform boys under the age of sixteen who had committed criminal acts. The school taught boys to be farmers, dairymen, tailors, carpenters, linemen, cobblers, barbers, cooks, waiters, machinists, and engineers.

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Harry Walter Colmery as a young boy.

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery, 1890-1979, Topeka attorney, American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights. The photograph was taken when he was a young boy.

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Rural Free Delivery wagon, Maple Hill, Kansas

These two black and white photographs show the first Rural Free Delivery wagon for the U.S. mail in Maple Hill, Kansas. In the first image Mr. Joe Boyd, is seated behind the horse-drawn wagon as a unidentified girl stands in the cab of the vehicle The second image show two women and three children informally posing with Mr. Boyd and his wagon at a unidentified location. The wagon is label R.F.D. No. 1, U.S. Mail, Maple Hill Kan.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, where hundreds of free state supporters were gathering for a Mass Convention on the 3rd and meeting of the free state legislature on the 4th, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. Cyrus reported that U. S. dragoons from Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley were camped around Topeka, since difficulty was expected. [In fact, U. S. and proslavery troops dispersed the free state legislature on the 4th.) Two companies of northern immigrants had been turned back at the Missouri River. Cyrus seemed skeptical that effective action would be taken against this outrage.

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William "Bill" Preston Graves, Kansas Governor

Three photographs showing Governor William "Bill" Preston Graves signing SB 424 at the Topeka YWCA day-care center. The bill created a new health insurance program for low income children. Standing behind and beside Graves are: Cimone and Jory, children from the day-care center; Representative Nancy Kirk; Kathleen Sebelius, Insurance Commissioner; Janet Schalansky, Social Rehabilitation Services Deputy Secretary; and Senator Marge Petty.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday in Topeka, Kansas Territory. Expecting their first child March 7 or 8, Mary delicately discussed her pregnancy. She assured C. K. Holliday of her willingness to live in rough housing with him. She hesitated to send money for his trip to Meadville, as mail delivery was slow and unreliable, and encouraged him to stay until she was able to travel if best for business and their future good. She also mentioned local mad-dog attacks.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he had stopped on his way to visit Governor Andrew H. Reeder at the Shawnee Indian Mission. Holliday hoped to make the growing Topeka the capital of Kansas Territory. In Lawrence, a hotel keeper had died and George W. Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom, was ill. Despite mail-delaying winter storms further east, the weather continued mildly. Holliday described his financial investments and requested money for his trip to Meadville, more urgent as the birth of their first child approached.

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