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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 20 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station logo

Bosin, Blackbear

Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station corporate insignia designed by artist Blackbear Bosin. Completed in 1985 after years of debate over nuclear power, the Wolf Creek Generating Station is located near Burlington, Kansas. Plant owner?s commissioned American-Indian artist Blackbear Bosin to design this corporate insignia. In the mythological design, he included the wolf, a great provider, and the Sirius Star, a symbol of heat, to promote the positive aspects of the plant. Bosin was born of Kiowa and Comanche heritage in Oklahoma. He served in the Marines during WWII and worked as an illustrator in Wichita. This poster, signed by Bosin, was given to Governor John Carlin for his support of the Wolf Creek Station.

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Princess Waconda

Herschel C. Logan

Salina artist Herschel Logan created this pen and ink drawing for a intended book about Waconda Springs. The drawing references a mythological character associated with the Waconda Springs in Mitchell County. According to legend, Waconda was the daughter of an Indian chief and fell in love with a warrior from an opposing tribe. Upon discovery of their relationship, the two jumped into the Springs and drowned. Their death imbued the springs with medicinal capabilities. Sometime after 1870 a sanitarium and water bottling company were constructed on the site and operated until 1964. That year, the Bureau of Reclamation began construction of the Waconda Lake reservoir, leading to the destruction of the springs and sanitarium. The artist, Herschel Logan worked as a graphic designer in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was associated with the Prairie Print Makers, a group of Midwestern artists that produced art in the 1930s.

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Johnston Lykins

Johnston Lykins was a well-known missionary, physician, and translator who worked with the Pottawatomi and Shawnee Indians who had moved to Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830. In 1831, after serving as a missionary to the Indian tribes in Indiana and Michigan, Lykins and his first wife Delilah (McCoy) Lykins moved to Indian Territory. Lykins and his father-in-law, Isaac McCoy, established the Shawnee Indian Baptist Mission in present-day Johnson County, Kansas. In addition to his responsibilities as a physician, Lykins worked as a translator and developed a system of Indian orthography that allowed the Shawnee people to read and write in their native language. He edited and published the first paper printed in Shawnee, called the Sinwiowe Kesibwi (Shawnee Sun). In the spring of 1843, Lykins founded a mission among the Pottawatomi near what is today Topeka. Due, perhaps, to inter-denominational conflicts and other problems with the mission, Lykins left the Pottawatomi mission and moved to Kansas City, Missouri. He served as the second mayor of Kansas City in 1854, and he remained in residence there until his death in 1876.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton predicted a good property market for the coming spring, despite the "hard money matters" which had been the situation during the winter. He reported that the Shawnee lands would open soon, to have them paid for by the end of the summer, and that Hill's land investments in Manhattan were "in good standing". Morton added that Samuel Simpson has been busy lately, traveling back and forth from Quindaro to Lawrence.

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Richard Mendenhall to Augustus Wattles

Mendenhall, Richard

Richard Mendenhall was a missionary at the Shawnee Friends Mission in the 1840s. He returned to Indiana for a time but moved back to Kansas Territory in the fall of 1855. He was in Kansas during the territorial era and wrote Wattles describing an attact on the Friends Mission on August 20, 1856 by proslavery forces. He indicated that they were told to leave or the mission would be burned. However, Mendenhall wrote that David Atchison and other proslavery supporters asked that the Friends be left out of the violence. Mendenhall also described an attempt to form a settlement by men from Georgia about 3 miles from Osawatomie. He wrote that they were friendly at first but they later committed depredations. In response, about 100 free state men ran them off, took $500 in clothing and provisions, and burned a fort they had built. Mendenhall believed that the Battle of Osawatomie was a response to this.

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Robert Simerwell, Quarterly Statement to the American Baptist Publication Society

Simerwell, Robert, 1786-1868

This quarterly statement was written by Robert Simerwell, a missionary colporteur with the American Baptist Publication Society. It contains the dollar amounts for the number of books on hand, his salary for one month, and the amount from book sales, among other items.

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Johnston Lykins' Shawnee verb conjugations

Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876

In his journal Johnston Lykins, a missionary to the Shawnee Indians in Kansas Territory, jotted down verb conjugations for the Shawnee alphabet he had developed while working at the Shawnee Mission. The notes include both singular and plural forms of the verb ?to strike? in English and in Shawnee.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he had stopped on his way to visit Governor Andrew H. Reeder at the Shawnee Indian Mission. Holliday hoped to make the growing Topeka the capital of Kansas Territory. In Lawrence, a hotel keeper had died and George W. Brown, editor of the Herald of Freedom, was ill. Despite mail-delaying winter storms further east, the weather continued mildly. Holliday described his financial investments and requested money for his trip to Meadville, more urgent as the birth of their first child approached.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chawick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, to tell him that it appeared favorable that Hill would win possession of the land disputed by Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. However, Chadwick feared that the decision may not be made as easily as he had earlier anticipated, since Robert Lawrence had been seen in Leavenworth and had not traveled to Washington to work with Nathaniel Causin. Nonetheless, Abelard Guthrie had given up trying to obtain the land as well, leaving Hiram as the only other claimant.

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