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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 31 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Charles Blood Smith

Uhl, S. Jerome

Oil portrait of Charles Blood Smith by artist Jerome S. Uhl. The subject was a prominent Topeka lawyer who started a firm with William H. Rossington in 1876. The artist was a painter from Cincinnati, Ohio, who studied in Paris, exhibited in Europe, and painted portraits of a number of prominent Americans.

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Wright's Dry Goods store, Columbus, Kansas

An exterior view of Wright's Dry Goods store owned by Isaac Wright, Columbus, Kansas. Employees and possibly customers are posed in the doorways of the business. On the second floor of the building is the law office of C. D. Ashley

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William Cather Hook

This is a portrait of William Cather Hook, who was born in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, on September 24, 1857, the son of Enos and Elizabeth (Inghram) Hook. The family came west and in 1867. They settled in Leavenworth, which became the family's permanent home. William Hook graduated from Leavenworth High School and then studied in the law office of Clough and Wheat. He later studied at St. Louis Law School, Law Department of Washington University, and graduated in 1878. After graduation, Hook became a member of the Lucian Baker law firm in Leavenworth. When Mr. Baker was elected to the United States Senate, the law firm of Baker, Hook and Atwood was formed. In 1899 William Hook was appointed United States District Judge for the District of Kansas. He was advanced to the bench of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1903, appointed by President Theodore Roosevelt. Judge Hook remained on the federal bench until his death on August 11, 1921.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by Rev. Robert Norris, secretary of the Kansas State Temperance Union, and Julian K. Codding, attorney for the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson and Minnie Wood, presidents of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J. M. Dunlavy, president of the Crawford County Civil League and Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J. W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU in Fort Scott, John Wiswell, chairman of the Cherokee County Law Enforcement Aid Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by the Kansas State Temperance Union (KSTU). Rev. Robert Norris acted as secretary, John Marshall, attorney, and Julian K. Codding, attorney and later president of the Kansas State Temperance Union. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. J.M. Dunlavy, superintendent of the Third Congressional District of the KSTU, Rev. J.W. Primrose, superintendent of the Second Congressional District of the KSTU, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, president of the Third District of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union, the Kansas State Prohibition Committee, and representatives from the Anti-Saloon League of America. Much of the correspondence concerns efforts to advance anti-liquor agendas in local, state, and national politics. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Washburn Law School, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the Washburn Law School in Topeka, Kansas. The school opened its doors on September 17, 1903 at 118 West Eight Street. In 1911, the school moved to 725-27 Kansas Avenue to accommodate increasing enrollment. Within two years the institution was moving once again after Washburn trustees agreed to purchase the Bell Telephone building at 211 West Sixth Avenue. This location was intended to be the permanent home for the law school but due to renovation problems, the school moved to the Washburn Campus, in 1918, and into the basement of Crane Observatory until future accommodations could be made. A bicycle is visible outside of the building.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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Fremont Leidy

Rolfe & Colville

A portrait of Fremont Leidy, the son of Abram and Martha Leidy. He grew up on the family farm in Butler County, Kansas, attended high schools in Augusta and El Dorado, and graduated from Fort Scott Normal School in 1887. After graduation he accepted a position as principal at Severy Schools and two years later the superintendency of the Augusta schools. Three years later he entered law school at Kansas University and was admitted to practice in 1893. He opened an office at El Dorado where he practiced a short time. Health issues forced him to leave his law practice and he started a farm. In 1900 he was elected to the Kansas Senate, representing District 25 in Butler County and served for two years. Governor Stanley selected him as a member of the text-book commission. In 1908 he was reelected to the senate. On June 27, 1910, Leidy was appointed United State revenue collector for Kansas. He married Myrtle Jenkins on July, 1893 and they had three children: Pauline, Richard J., and Roger. Myrtle died on July 22, 1906 and he married A. Zota Martin on September 9, 1914.

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Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan

Long, Nelson

This is a photograph of Edward Ray and Julia Wright Sloan taken on their wedding day. Edward Ray Sloan later served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term.

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Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College

This is Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College, Holton, Kansas, where he received a degree of Bachelor of Laws. Edward Ray Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904; however, Campbell's program lasted only two years and the Kansas Board of Law Examiners required a three-year course before taking the bar exam, so he entered Washburn College law school and graduated in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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