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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 60 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

F. W. Jordan and Leo Sterns in an automobile, Dorrance, Kansas

Halbe, L. W. (Leslie Winfield), 1893-1981

View of F. W. Jordan and Leo Sterns seated in a convertible automobile parked in front of Weber & Peirano's vehicles and implements store in Dorrance, Russell County, Kansas. Also visible are a large wood-framed barn with advertisements for John Deere and Sharples Cream Separators, two saw horses to the right of the Weber & Peirano store, and a grain elevator in the distance.

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John Brown to Mary Brown and family

Brown, John, 1800-1859

In Scott Co., Iowa ("about 4 miles West of the Mississippi"), on his way to Kansas Territory, John Brown wrote the family to say all was well despite some delays caused by their freight in Chicago and a sick horse. Brown commented mostly on the nature of there journey to date and some miscellaneous business matters.

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John Brown to Mary Brown and family

Brown, John, 1800-1859

One week after arriving at his sons' settlement ("Brownville") near Osawatomie, Brown wrote the family back east that although most were sick when he first arrived, they "appear now to be mending." The trip across Missouri was without incident, except for problems with a sick horse and their "heavy load." Brown then wrote briefly of the Adairs, the "most uncomfortable situation" in which he found his children upon his arrival, and other things including prairie fires and finally the political situation in the territory. In fact, at this early date, John Brown "believe[d] Missouri is fast becoming discouraged about making Kansas a Slave State & think the prospect of its becoming Free is brightening every day."

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F. J. Birdsall's grandson, Custer, Oklahoma, Territory

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of F. J. Birdsall's grandson fishing in Custer, Oklahoma Territory. A dog and horse are present with the boy in the foreground, and unidentified buildings are visible on top of the hill in the background.

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George Allen's children, Meade, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a view of George Allen's children seated on a horse that is drinking from a water trough. A dog and several other horses are also visible in the photograph.

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Spectators at a baseball game

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a view of people, cars, and carriages at a baseball game, presumed to have been taken in Haskell County, Kansas.

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Children in the yard of a residence, Clark County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

This is a photograph of two children riding a horse and three children in the yard of an unidentified residence in Clark County, Kansas. A man and woman are visible seated on the porch in the background.

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Children in the yard of a residence, Clark County, Kansas

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of two children riding a horse and one child in the yard of an unidentified residence, Clark County. In the background, is a frame house with two porches.

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Potawatomi children wading in a pond

This photograph shows a group of five Potawatomi school children (four boys and one girl) wading in a pond. Also visible is a man holding two horses in the background.

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James R. Mead to his sister

Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836

James R. Mead writes this letter from his home "somewhere in the West." He has a trading post about twenty miles north of the Saline River and west of Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. He describes in detail the abundance of wildlife, calling western Kansas the "Land of Plenty." Mead and his business partners trade with the Kaw Indians, mostly for furs. His first impression of this tribe was unfavorable, but in his later years he came to respect the Kaw and believed that they were an honest people. He also mentions the Copperhead Indians, who were more fierce and warlike than the Kaw. Mead and his companions are building a blockhouse in case there is trouble. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.

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