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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka?s leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman?s Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).

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Dwight David Eisenhower camping with a group of boys.

Dwight David Eisenhower is camping with a group of boys near Abilene, Kansas, in this photograph.

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Samuel Crumbine poster

Public poster with Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine banning the public drinking cup, common roller towel, and encouraging the swatting of flies. Dr. Samuel J. Crumbine of Dodge City was one of the nation's leaders in the field of public health. He became secretary of the Kansas State Board of Health in 1904 and served for approximately 20 years. His public health campaigns were directed at practices and conditions that led to the spread of communicable diseases.

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Samuel Reader self-portrait

Reader, Samuel J.

Self-portrait by Samuel Reader, an early settler and chronicler of territorial life in Kansas. This watercolor was executed in 1908, but based on an early daguerreotype photograph. Reader was an avid diarist who drew in his diaries and, later, his autobiography. During his lifetime, Samuel Reader was best known for his drawings and paintings of the Battle of the Big Blue and other Civil War experiences in Kansas.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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Samuel Jay Crumbine

A portrait of Samuel Jay Crumbine, who in 1904 became secretary of the State Board of Health. During his tenure, he became internationally famous for his campaign against unscreened windows, the house fly, common drinking cup, spitting in public, and misleading labels on food and drugs. Crumbine's slogans included "Swat the Fly" and "Don't Spit on the Sidewalk."

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Hockaday Motor Cycle Company

Business advertisement contained in the Automobile Club of Wichita's "Year Book" for 1909 to 1910. "Woody" Hockaday, a automobile dealer from Wichita, launched a campaign to mark Kansas auto routes. Later in 1918, he published a road map showing 33 marked highways in the United States.

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Carry Nation poster

Gillin Print Company

Large, rectangular color poster advertising an appearance by Carry Nation, a temperance advocate who gained notoriety by attacking saloons. Her activities began in Medicine Lodge, Kansas, in 1899. A hatchet was her symbol because she often used the tool to smash saloon fixtures. In Nation?s autobiography, The Use and Need of the Life of Carry A. Nation, she explained the genesis of this poster. While jailed in Topeka for smashing saloon fixtures in July 1901, Nation received a letter from James Furlong, manager of the Lyceum Theater in Rochester, New York. According to Nation, Furlong offered to bail her out of jail if she granted him some lecture dates. She agreed, was pardoned, and left almost immediately for a Chautauqua in Clarksburg, Ohio. Her lecture series continued across upstate New York.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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The Topeka daily capital. Sheldon edition

Sheldon, Charles Monroe, 1857-1946

Congregational minister, Charles M. Sheldon is best known for his book, In His Steps (published in 1897), and for his efforts to obtain better educational opportunities for African Americans living in Tennessee Town (a former district of Topeka, Kansas). In March 1900, Frederick O. Popenoe, editor and owner of The Topeka Daily Capital, gave Sheldon complete control over the paper for a week. Sheldon tried to publish the paper as he thought Jesus would, refusing to print "hard" news or ads for tobacco, alcohol or patent medicines. Circulation rose from 15,000 daily copies to well over 350,000. He listed every person, including the janitor, in the editorial column except for Popenoe who had angered Sheldon by hiring an agent to advertise the special editions. All six issues of Sheldon's edition are included here. A searchable transcription is not yet available.

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